I love my motorcycle

Retro Royal Enfield ? Having had a Crusader as a first ride back in the early 60's, I wouldn't indulge in an Indian one.
You could always spot where an Enfield had parked by, the oil spot, they also used to be very 'maintenance heavy'!

I had a ride of a Kawasaki W650 about 15 years ago and, loved it. The problem is, they stopped making 'em in 2007 and, nobody wants to sell theirs back then, looks more like an old style Triumph, than a Triumph.

My description after riding one was "Slick as Whale shit on an ice flow", massive grin factor.
 
Retro Royal Enfield ? Having had a Crusader as a first ride back in the early 60's, I wouldn't indulge in an Indian one.
You could always spot where an Enfield had parked by, the oil spot, they also used to be very 'maintenance heavy'!

I had a ride of a Kawasaki W650 about 15 years ago and, loved it. The problem is, they stopped making 'em in 2007 and, nobody wants to sell theirs back then, looks more like an old style Triumph, than a Triumph.

My description after riding one was "Slick as Whale shit on an ice flow", massive grin factor.
The modern Enfield Bullets are definitely not like the old factory. When the Indians first started building the machines, they were using old worn out machinery from the old factory.
The latest bikes are oil tight, electric start, disc brakes and fuel injection.
 
I had a ride of a Kawasaki W650 about 15 years ago and, loved it. The problem is, they stopped making 'em in 2007 and, nobody wants to sell theirs back then, looks more like an old style Triumph, than a Triumph.

My description after riding one was "Slick as Whale shit on an ice flow", massive grin factor.
There's a few around.

 

Arte_et_Marte

ADC
Moderator
I need this lock-down crap to end. I've got things to do, places to go, people to meet in fields for a drink.

camping woodhall spa for arrse.jpg


ETA. This was taken at the beginning of last year. That wonderful Triumph Tiger has been replaced with a nice shiny CBF 1000. But the sentiment remains the same.
 
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Unfortunately, the DVLA saw fit to revoke my licences last September,as I have a 'visual impairment' that isn't going to get better !

All I can do is look these days.
The irony of it!
That's a bummer, sorry to hear that.
Anyway, fcuk the system, it's only there to control us.
Buy one anyway., riding is about freedom, not petty rules!
 

Blogg

LE
No rush mate. Old gits buy 'em, thinking they're all young again, sell 'em 5 years later with less than a thousand miles on 'em. Carefully run in, and regularly polished. That's how I got the current Bonnie. 107 miles on it.
That is pretty much how No.1 son acquired his current ride, although previous owner did at least manage 1,000 miles.

In 3 years.

But he did have the decency to add a number of expensive OEM bits and bobs plus fit some Crack o' Doom pipes.
 
The irony of it!
That's a bummer, sorry to hear that.
Anyway, fcuk the system, it's only there to control us.
Buy one anyway., riding is about freedom, not petty rules!
I told my friend in France about it last year, his reply was "it's not problem, we organise when you visit us"!

Was going to vist just after Easter ! Ooops :mrgreen:
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
I reckon that once the pangolinpox has finished we will be seeing far more of these Adventure bikes about, in all honesty far more useful in the real world than the BMW GS that rides into town occasionally
 
I reckon that once the pangolinpox has finished we will be seeing far more of these Adventure bikes about, in all honesty far more useful in the real world than the BMW GS that rides into town occasionally
Expected to be about £3500, rather fancy one for local journeys.
(posted before watching the video)
 
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I reckon that once the pangolinpox has finished we will be seeing far more of these Adventure bikes about, in all honesty far more useful in the real world than the BMW GS that rides into town occasionally
I learnt on a mates Trail Cub in Singapore on the land next to the officers MQ.
 
I reckon that once the pangolinpox has finished we will be seeing far more of these Adventure bikes about, in all honesty far more useful in the real world than the BMW GS that rides into town occasionally
Love it, but I would still prefer a Monkey Bike. It would be a good, fun, project to get a stock C90 from eBay and make your own adv version.
A mate's dad has a Honda X-Adv adventure scooter thing, it goes like sh!t off a shovel, I would also have one of those.
 
Love it, but I would still prefer a Monkey Bike. It would be a good, fun, project to get a stock C90 from eBay and make your own adv version.
A mate's dad has a Honda X-Adv adventure scooter thing, it goes like sh!t off a shovel, I would also have one of those.
The little Grom ain’t bad. My lad whizzes around on his quite happily. He has put a better exhaust on there along with a heavy duty clutch and a bobbed rear end.
 
The little Grom ain’t bad. My lad whizzes around on his quite happily. He has put a better exhaust on there along with a heavy duty clutch and a bobbed rear end.
Is he bustin' wheelies?
 
Is he bustin' wheelies?
He would never admit to it, but I think he has tried.............the bike is in my name and my insurance so if it is dinged his mother would castrate him. He also wants to trade it in for a CBR 600 in the future so needs to keep it tidy.
 
The Australian Postie bikes are selling for near that in good order, so I reckon its a bargain, but will probably be nearer 4 grand when it gets here
Aussie CT110 postie bikes, have got a heck of a reputation down under. There was always someone touring Oz on one.
Come to think of it, there was a lad who rode back to the U.K. from Oz on one a few years ago.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
Meep meep, escaping the island with the Larry L-plates.
View attachment 472719
I love riding smaller motorcycles, they have a perfect balance, find the sweet spot and motor on all day
Their is a chart some where in one of my many books, thats shows a small motorcycle, 50cc, its power output and weight and usable range ie speed/fuel use and carrying capacity
then a giant behemoth again showing the range, carrying capacity, power output fuel consumption
for all the power the real world gains are not that much
( OK a small engine of 50cc will have a life of around 10 thousand miles between cheap overhauls)
then a chart, which strangely is not linear
its logarithmic

you see as engine size increases usable power doubles at first 50-100cc then 100cc -250cc
then 250-cc-400cc, then it peaks a little to 500cc not much of a gain, then 600cc it jumps, but beyond that the real world gains are not that great, as you climb to 750, the weight of the engine becomes greater, the frame bigger to handle the power, the brakes wheels and suspension bigger, likewise electrical starting and charging systems

the chart also shows a time period 1899 to 1918
1918- 1930
1930-1950
1950-1970
1970-1990

the very early motorcycles had less than half of the power of that Honda, however slow revving engines and cycle type frames kept weight down, but roads were poorer so average speed was lower

A triumph Model H ( 30,000 produced for the war office) kicks out 4 horsepower weighs about the same as the Honda
yet Honda kicks out three times that but fuel economy is much the same, however reliability and less maintenance shoot right up

in the late 50s to early 70s, most rider used a 350cc single, =weight low, fuel economy excellent and reasonable power output for real world riding, even Triumph offered their twins in 350cc format 80mpg the norm

I used to cover vast distances on a 250cc MZ, although lusting after a bigger smoother motorcycle, the MZ gave me 80mpg on a run and was silky smooth
when I bought a bigger motorcycle fuel consumption went up as did tyre wear and vibration

Providing you avoid motorways, for normal motorcycle touring a motorcycle of between 250cc to 500cc is more than enough, also means you can manoeuvre it on tight roads, ride onto the ferry easily, and if you drop it you can pick it up
I tour on a 750 twin, its modernish but only develops the same power out as a Triumph Tiger 500 of the late 60s, but without the oil leaks and vibration
70mpg is the norm, 170Kg fuelled up

but I would be happier with something smaller, last year met a young couple touring Europe on a Suzuki 500cc twin, that he used to go to work on
A long dead friend toured Europe on his 3 speed 125cc Bantam after his national Service, but then roads were a little narrower then, but i reckon with care you could still do it
perhaps after next years big trip, I might look at a smaller light Guzzi , a 175cc four stroke single and enjoy the ride
 

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