I just need someone to tell me it's going to be ok...maybe?

Someone calm me down please?

After a few years now I've finally decided to start my application and now things are rolling... I'm bricking it... 3 times now my RGMD has been sent back for further questions but I've finally been accepted for that and have my medical assesment booked in for 2 weeks time (really not bothered by that because all I've told to prepare for is an eye test, hearing test and walking on the soles of my feet) after that I can book in for my briefing. I've spent hours and hours and hours researching what to expect at briefing and main board and now feel fairly clued up on what to expect but after the constant issues with the RGMD and also covid changing the process, I think I've managed to convince myself that i'm just going to mess everything up.
I just think after preparing myself over the past few years for this and then being set back 3 times at the RGMD that it's knocked my confidence a little which is not my personality at all.
I guess what I'm trying to get at is if someone could tell me how truly difficult briefing and main board actually is? I'm fairly good at the writing and public speaking elements, along with the fitness (I've been training at the gym to a high level for the past 5 years) and the maths computer tests I should be ok (I've just passed my chartered accountants and chartered tax advisor exams so I'd consider myself good at maths) and interview technique, that is what it is but I'm so bloody determined to get there that I think I'll fail on something so simple.
Does anybody know what the average pass rate is? What's the percentage of people that make it from briefing to main board and then what's the percentage that make it from main board to Sandhurst?
I must admit, both parents went through Sandhurst and one has retired now and the other is now still doing well in the army but I simply get told by them to "sort yourself out and stop f***ing about and just get on with it" but that isn't helping right now...
Of course, something that is common on here, please do link me to a similar thread if you think this has already been discussed. I've tried to search and couldn't find anything that was telling someone to just man up and get on with it.
Cheers in advance!
 
Stop. Take a deep breath.

Learn how to do speed/distance /time calculations - you will need them for the plan ex, but briefing they will explain it all.

Don't over think it, go in and do your best, thats all you can do.

Don't flap or fluster, it doesn't help. Keep yourself fit, make sure to get a decent night's sleep before you start and go in clear headed.
 
Stop. Take a deep breath.

Learn how to do speed/distance /time calculations - you will need them for the plan ex, but briefing they will explain it all.

Don't over think it, go in and do your best, thats all you can do.

Don't flap or fluster, it doesn't help. Keep yourself fit, make sure to get a decent night's sleep before you start and go in clear headed.
Thank you, I'm just so desperate to get there now you know? I've spent most of my adult life working in management roles to bulk up my experience along with all my research and fitness that I think I'd just be crushed if I didn't make it.
I just want to go into my interview and say "Look, I'm really ******* dedicated to do this and I'll give it everything I've got so just please give me a chance yes?" but I doubt that would get me very far at all! I'm hoping for a Sept'22 intake to Sandhurst so I'm trying to focus that whatever the outcome, within a years time I'll know if I'm going there or if I need to plan another path in life.
Thanks again!
 
We had a female Captain with us for a while, fit in both senses of the word, clever, but over thought everything. When she did briefings she used to speak at 20 to the dozen and regardless of questions asked of her would give the answer she wanted to give.

One day a junior Lance Corporal stood up whilst she was speeding through a briefing and giving answers she wanted to hear rather than the answers needed. “Ma’am, when someone asks you a question do us all a favour and shut the fcuk up, count to ten whilst thinking of a useful answer, then engage your brain and speak”. He wasn’t locked up.

After that for a while whenever she was asked a question we used to all openly count down from ten. It worked, made her pause to think, reflect, consider and engage brain before operating mouth.

What I am saying is; pause for thought, for a moment, but not too long so you look stupid, and you will be perfectly fine. My BiL is an FCA, retired, senior partner at DeLoittes, all the FCA’s I ever met were decisive, confident individuals. You’ll do fine, just do not mention your worries to anyone……you never know who will say what to whom.
 
Over thinking things can be a killer, grab a pen and start writing down your thoughts on paper, write anything and everything related to this process. Read them later or not it doesn't matter emptying your mind like this releases the worry and believe it or not it will start to calm you down.

It has worked for me quite a few times when facing high stress situations. Unable to sleep sometimes I would get up and jot anything down that came into my mind even on scrap paper in the dark but it worked, the sleep was worth it.
 
...And remember you're not special. Everyone else there is in the same boat and crapping Dannert wire. If you're the calm, stable one, you act as a nucleus for everyone else to settle down as well. We think better like that.

Just take a deep breath and act logically. The speed/time/distance hint is a good one. All nav operates around that idea. Chuck in a compass bearing and you're good to go.

Also, officers with maps are a danger to themselves and others. It's OK to ask an NCO or a troep.
 
...And remember you're not special. Everyone else there is in the same boat and crapping Dannert wire. If you're the calm, stable one, you act as a nucleus for everyone else to settle down as well. We think better like that.

Just take a deep breath and act logically. The speed/time/distance hint is a good one. All nav operates around that idea. Chuck in a compass bearing and you're good to go.

Also, officers with maps are a danger to themselves and others. It's OK to ask an NCO or a troep.
Won't need bearings for aosb.
 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
Also, officers with maps are a danger to themselves and others. It's OK to ask an NCO or a troep.
More tired old rubbish. Badges worn don’t make someone good or bad at navigation - training and practice (or lack thereof) do.

Junior officers struggle with navigation because they haven’t usually had the time to build the skills yet. Take a similarly experienced NCO and put them at the front of the lead Pl of a Company move and see how they get on. I have done this a few times and it is amazing how quickly they bottle it.

Why does this matter to the OP?

1. Don’t believe the BS. NCOs run the full spectrum from totally useless to incredibly talented. Don’t believe for a second that the badge they wear automatically makes them capable.
2. Following from 1, identify and use talent when you know where it lies. For navigation, I would look towards someone involved in controlling fires, patrols/recce etc for check nav. The average section commander may have actually done very little, no matter how much they like to drag out the tired old cliches.
3. Build your skills. If you get through AOSB, time spent learning and practicing navigation before you attend RMAS will always stand you in good stead.
 
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More tired old rubbish. Badges worn don’t make someone good or bad at navigation - training and practice (or lack thereof) do.

Junior officers struggle with navigation because they haven’t usually had the time to build the skills yet. Take a similarly experienced NCO and put them at the front of the lead Pl of a Company move and see how they get on. I have done this a few times and it is amazing how quickly they bottle it.

Why does this matter to the OP?

1. Don’t believe the BS. NCOs run the full spectrum from totally useless to incredibly talented. Don’t believe for a second that the badge they wear automatically makes them capable.
2. Following from 1, identify and use talent when you know where it lies. For navigation, I would look towards someone involved in controlling fires, patrols/recce etc for check nav. The average section commander may have actually done very little, no matter how much they like to drag out the tired old cliches.
3. Build your skills. If you get through AOSB, time spent learning and practicing navigation before you attend RMAS will always stand you in good stead.
Agreed. When I commissioned i had been hiking and hill walking with scouts for 8 or 9 years, plus 6 years otc/reserve soldier service.

I have never had an issue with nav.
 
Take up Orienteering. A season's worth of A string events running about the woods will sort out anyone's practical navigation.

Running at speed, making quick decisions to reach a point (control) on a map which cannot be replicated in a classroom, or on an exercise with the luxury of time, cannot be underestimated.

When you decide to try a fight-through the undergrowth becasue it's shorter and you're ripped to shreds and knackered, means next time you decide to take an easier but longer route to attain the same goal
 

Nemesis44UK

LE
Book Reviewer
Someone calm me down please?

After a few years now I've finally decided to start my application and now things are rolling... I'm bricking it... 3 times now my RGMD has been sent back for further questions but I've finally been accepted for that and have my medical assesment booked in for 2 weeks time (really not bothered by that because all I've told to prepare for is an eye test, hearing test and walking on the soles of my feet) after that I can book in for my briefing. I've spent hours and hours and hours researching what to expect at briefing and main board and now feel fairly clued up on what to expect but after the constant issues with the RGMD and also covid changing the process, I think I've managed to convince myself that i'm just going to mess everything up.
I just think after preparing myself over the past few years for this and then being set back 3 times at the RGMD that it's knocked my confidence a little which is not my personality at all.
I guess what I'm trying to get at is if someone could tell me how truly difficult briefing and main board actually is? I'm fairly good at the writing and public speaking elements, along with the fitness (I've been training at the gym to a high level for the past 5 years) and the maths computer tests I should be ok (I've just passed my chartered accountants and chartered tax advisor exams so I'd consider myself good at maths) and interview technique, that is what it is but I'm so bloody determined to get there that I think I'll fail on something so simple.
Does anybody know what the average pass rate is? What's the percentage of people that make it from briefing to main board and then what's the percentage that make it from main board to Sandhurst?
I must admit, both parents went through Sandhurst and one has retired now and the other is now still doing well in the army but I simply get told by them to "sort yourself out and stop f***ing about and just get on with it" but that isn't helping right now...
Of course, something that is common on here, please do link me to a similar thread if you think this has already been discussed. I've tried to search and couldn't find anything that was telling someone to just man up and get on with it.
Cheers in advance!

Your preparation sounds excellent, but I do believe that you're talking yourself into failure. You're guilty of overthinking when really, it seems that you have this.

Stop obsessing about what the pass rate is etc. and relax. Jettison all that stuff because it will only stress you more if you know about it either way.

A lot of exam points are lost because students misread the questions because of stress. So be calm, deep breaths and stop wreaking havoc on your own prep.

As others have mentioned upthread, join an orienteering club and it'll be easy-peasy.

Believe in yourself, the only person that can stop you is you.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Your preparation sounds excellent, but I do believe that you're talking yourself into failure. You're guilty of overthinking when really, it seems that you have this.

Stop obsessing about what the pass rate is etc. and relax. Jettison all that stuff because it will only stress you more if you know about it either way.

A lot of exam points are lost because students misread the questions because of stress. So be calm, deep breaths and stop wreaking havoc on your own prep.

As others have mentioned upthread, join an orienteering club and it'll be easy-peasy.

Believe in yourself, the only person that can stop you is you.
This.

Do your prep and then turn up and do your best. That’s all you can do.

Don’t stun yourself into inaction with every ‘What if?’.

If you’ve prepped as much as you can, you can do no more.

You may even be pleasantly surprised.

Good luck.
 
Believe in yourself, the only person that can stop you is you.

Mate, that was beautiful. I promised myself I wouldn't well up, but . . .


4.jpg
 
For clarity folks:

All the advice on navigation is valid, however IT IS NOT NEEDED FOR AOSB.

The closest a to a nav test is mental maths (covered by OP) and the planning exercise, with speed/distance/time being the only need for that purpose.

OP, calm down, gather yourself and you will be fine.
 
....The closest a to a nav test is mental maths...

Even better. If you can figure out a few basic rules of thumb like distance covered in an hour at various speeds, you're platinum coated.
 
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