I hope this is true

#1
This was posted on my forums at EduGeek. If it is true I'm investing!!

If you had purchased £1000 of Northern Rock shares one year ago it would now be worth £4.95, with HBOS, earlier this week your £1000 would have been worth £16.50, £1000 invested in XL Leisure would now be worth less than £5, but if you bought £1000 worth of Tennents Lager one year ago, drank it all, then took the empty cans to an aluminium re-cycling plant, you would get £214.

So based on the above statistics the best current investment advice is to drink heavily and re-cycle.
 
#3
Nope - total bollocks & here's why:

Are you seriously claiming that a quarter of the value of a can of beer is recyclable aluminium?

In which case beer in a pub should be cheaper than in the shop, since that can is not wasted?

hmm let's see now ...

Tesco online currently sells Carling 24 x 440ml lager for £15.98, so £1000 buys 1505 cans. I have chosen a lager currently selling at a 20% discount to give this outrageous claim the best possible chance of success.

The mass of a can falls over time as manufacturing and design become more efficient, and most numbers online do not state what size of can they refer to, but 55 cans to 1kg of aluminium is a low estimate (I found lots of 67-70 cans per kg figures). So we have 27kg of aluminium.

This week's scrap prices for loose aluminium cans is around $0.34 per pound, or £0.40 per kg. (Here I use quoted US prices, admittedly probably lower than UK prices which are harder to find, but to compensate I have taken the wholesale LTL price which is generous: LTL stands for "less than truckload" which refers to loads typically of the range of 50-5000 kg, and our 27kg is pretty borderline.)

So the scrap merchant pays us £11 for our 1505 cans and in fact HBOS would have been a better investment even if it was only worth £16.50.

But it turns out that's rubbish as well. It is in fact down 74.4% year-on-year, not 98.4%, and would have left you with £250, not £16. Even assuming this nonsense was written at the exact intraday low on 17 September, it was only down 89.8% yoy, and £100 is a lot more than £16.

Congratulations!
 
#4
Conall said:
Nope - total balls & here's why:

Are you seriously claiming that a quarter of the value of a can of beer is recyclable aluminium?

In which case beer in a pub should be cheaper than in the shop, since that can is not wasted?

hmm let's see now ...

Tesco online currently sells Carling 24 x 440ml lager for £15.98, so £1000 buys 1505 cans. I have chosen a lager currently selling at a 20% discount to give this outrageous claim the best possible chance of success.

The mass of a can falls over time as manufacturing and design become more efficient, and most numbers online do not state what size of can they refer to, but 55 cans to 1kg of aluminium is a low estimate (I found lots of 67-70 cans per kg figures). So we have 27kg of aluminium.

This week's scrap prices for loose aluminium cans is around $0.34 per pound, or £0.40 per kg. (Here I use quoted US prices, admittedly probably lower than UK prices which are harder to find, but to compensate I have taken the wholesale LTL price which is generous: LTL stands for "less than truckload" which refers to loads typically of the range of 50-5000 kg, and our 27kg is pretty borderline.)

So the scrap merchant pays us £11 for our 1505 cans and in fact HBOS would have been a better investment even if it was only worth £16.50.

But it turns out that's rubbish as well. It is in fact down 74.4% year-on-year, not 98.4%, and would have left you with £250, not £16. Even assuming this nonsense was written at the exact intraday low on 17 September, it was only down 89.8% yoy, and £100 is a lot more than £16.

Congratulations!
Ahem, WAH!
 
#5
Someone has waaaaaayyyyy too much fucking time on their hands... :D
 
#7
dhgrainger1 said:
Conall said:
Nope - total balls & here's why:

Are you seriously claiming that a quarter of the value of a can of beer is recyclable aluminium?

In which case beer in a pub should be cheaper than in the shop, since that can is not wasted?

hmm let's see now ...

Tesco online currently sells Carling 24 x 440ml lager for £15.98, so £1000 buys 1505 cans. I have chosen a lager currently selling at a 20% discount to give this outrageous claim the best possible chance of success.

The mass of a can falls over time as manufacturing and design become more efficient, and most numbers online do not state what size of can they refer to, but 55 cans to 1kg of aluminium is a low estimate (I found lots of 67-70 cans per kg figures). So we have 27kg of aluminium.

This week's scrap prices for loose aluminium cans is around $0.34 per pound, or £0.40 per kg. (Here I use quoted US prices, admittedly probably lower than UK prices which are harder to find, but to compensate I have taken the wholesale LTL price which is generous: LTL stands for "less than truckload" which refers to loads typically of the range of 50-5000 kg, and our 27kg is pretty borderline.)

So the scrap merchant pays us £11 for our 1505 cans and in fact HBOS would have been a better investment even if it was only worth £16.50.

But it turns out that's rubbish as well. It is in fact down 74.4% year-on-year, not 98.4%, and would have left you with £250, not £16. Even assuming this nonsense was written at the exact intraday low on 17 September, it was only down 89.8% yoy, and £100 is a lot more than £16.

Congratulations!
Ahem, WAH!
Damn.And I just started my 715th can.
 

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