Hyperloop transport

#1
St, sorry Sir Richard is looking at setting up a hyperloop transport system linking two towns in India.

I'm curious as to how it's going to work though, he's going to have to build some big tubes to get all of this lot in the tube:


the-most-crowded-train.jpg
 
#2
The main technical challenge as I see it is how do you keep a vacuum sealed tube many miles long made of many pieces of tube aligned and sealed in any location where temperature varies during the day?

The radial thermal expansion would mean the tubes would foul against each other at the connection and the longitudinal displacement over 100km would be around 50m.

If you are firing humans through such a tube at 700mph, the tolerances of the pipes dimensions would be pretty tight I'd imagine.

I suspect that India has a slightly more cavalier attitude towards improven (safe) technology, so good luck to them

Because it's the NAAFI


Fuck bollocks etc
 
Last edited:
#3
Beardy Branson will do anything for free advertising.

I remember one of his first flights to JFK, he dressed as a female air stewardess to get free publicity.
As soon as we were in the air he came round gushing about how good the flight would be.
Once the cameras stopped so did he until a tabloid journo asked could they take photos of him serving passengers, oh we did enjoy that and everyone kept asking for things he did not have, Beardy was not happy.
 

49er

On ROPS
On ROPs
#4
The main technical challenge as I see it is how do you keep a vacuum sealed tube many miles long made of many pieces of tube aligned and sealed in any location where temperature varies during the day?



Because it's the NAAFI


**** bollocks etc
Not a problem, just line the route with "punka Wallahs". They can keep the thing cool.
 
#5
Presumably any joints will be lubricated with shit - nice and ecologically sustainable.

Edit - @RSupwood - are you sure it isn't a hyperpoop that is being proposed?
 
#9
Calling @earth. Your gibbering, racist input is required (for comedic purposes only).
 
#11
The main technical challenge as I see it is how do you keep a vacuum sealed tube many miles long made of many pieces of tube aligned and sealed in any location where temperature varies during the day?

The radial thermal expansion would mean the tubes would foul against each other at the connection and the longitudinal displacement over 100km would be around 50m.

If you are firing humans through such a tube at 700mph, the tolerances of the pipes dimensions would be pretty tight I'd imagine.

I suspect that India has a slightly more cavalier attitude towards improven (safe) technology, so good luck to them

Because it's the NAAFI


**** bollocks etc
Brunel thought he'd solved that one in 1848.

In this system, a piston (attached to the train) is contained in a large metal tube laid between the tracks. The tube is evacuated ahead of the train by a series of engine houses (with steam-driven pumps) situated roughly every three miles along the route. Atmospheric pressure acting on the piston provides the motive force, pushing the train forwards. This is similar to the principle used in early Newcomen-type steam engines. This system does away with the need for a mobile power plant in the form of a locomotive thus reducing the weight of the train. Brunel argued that this provided considerable economic advantage.

The biggest problem the atmospheric system faced was maintaining the vacuum while the piston moved. In the Clegg and Samuda design, adopted by Brunel, a slit along the top of the metal tube accommodates the piston and a hinged leather flap seals the slit maintaining the vacuum. As the train moves, the leather flap lifts ahead of the piston and, once the train has passed, the flap seals again. The original design included a protective weather seal which Brunel ignored; this was probably false economy given the effects of Devon rain and sea air.
 
#12
Brunel thought he'd solved that one in 1848.

In this system, a piston (attached to the train) is contained in a large metal tube laid between the tracks. The tube is evacuated ahead of the train by a series of engine houses (with steam-driven pumps) situated roughly every three miles along the route. Atmospheric pressure acting on the piston provides the motive force, pushing the train forwards. This is similar to the principle used in early Newcomen-type steam engines. This system does away with the need for a mobile power plant in the form of a locomotive thus reducing the weight of the train. Brunel argued that this provided considerable economic advantage.

The biggest problem the atmospheric system faced was maintaining the vacuum while the piston moved. In the Clegg and Samuda design, adopted by Brunel, a slit along the top of the metal tube accommodates the piston and a hinged leather flap seals the slit maintaining the vacuum. As the train moves, the leather flap lifts ahead of the piston and, once the train has passed, the flap seals again. The original design included a protective weather seal which Brunel ignored; this was probably false economy given the effects of Devon rain and sea air.
Ingenious, but not really applicable in the case of hyperloop.

Hyperloop is envisioned to be a series of connected metal tubes above ground, rather than an underground excavated tunnel.

It's a question of maintaining structural integrity and tight dimensional tolerances due to environmental and operational conditions.

Another issue being that even if one could pump a few hundred kilometres of pipeline down to a near vacuum without excessive pressure losses at any of the thousands of joints, the pressure differential between the inside of the pipe and the external pipe would create huge crushing loads radially to the tube. The pipe would need to be very thick and this creates more problems...
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top