HUPRA

#1
Anyone know if the RAF video of the bloke getting hung up from a C130 is available on the internet anywhere? I think it was late 80's and he was 15 PARA.
 
#3
It was the incident that was re-enacted on the BBC's '999' series and should be available through the BBC themselves.
 
#7
theparamancan said:
Anyone know if the RAF video of the bloke getting hung up from a C130 is available on the internet anywhere? I think it was late 80's and he was 15 PARA.
It was 1993 or 4. It was down to him that the elastic band tied to the CSPEP on the trailing leg was introduced - to tie up any suspension rope slack. Maybe he should have submitted a GEMS instead of just showing off.
 
#8
It was the incident that was re-enacted on the BBC's '999' series and should be available through the BBC themselves.
Yeah but i'm pretty sure the actual event was filmed from within the Herc (Saw it at Brize when I did my jumps - they fast forward a good few minutes of the Aircrew flapping like f*ck)
 
#10
I knew one of the PJI's on the original video, it was being filmed from within the C130, they knew immediately he'd been hung up and cracked on with the plan. It had only previously happened in the States, hence PTS had a plan and the kit so they were more then ready.

Good skills from PTS, C130 pilots/crew and the hung-up bloke, wasn't he unconscious by the time they released him ?
 
#12
Christ! I reckon the Brigade Para Squadron blokes and the whole of PTS are one of the most professional organisations in the military. Everyone takes everything so seriously on this site these days. If i was dangling along behind a C130, the PJI's could take as long as they pleased to sort me out and cut me away!
 
#13
Always used to remember looking at that bit of kit on the Herc and thinking and hoping that they never had to use it on me as in those days they never had much practice in using it.
 
#14
theparamancan said:
I reckon the Brigade Para Squadron blokes and the whole of PTS are one of the most professional organisations in the military. Everyone takes everything so seriously on this site these days. If i was dangling along behind a C130, the PJI's could take as long as they pleased to sort me out and cut me away!
So why did you post on a public forum that they were flapping on the aircraft then ?

They don't have long to initiate HUPRA procedures in case you are injured, do you think they would attempt to land the a/c with a hung-up parachutist, or do you think they would cut you free regardless of whether they had successfully used the kit ?

Yes I'm being serious, get some sky on your smock and deal with a few dramas yourself and you might take it seriously as well.
 
#16
I heard that when the guy landed the first thing he asked for from the medic was a ciggie!! I thought he was from 4 Para, but i maybe corrected on that.
 
#17
It was on a 4 PARA drop and he was 15 Coy (old 15 PARA). He did indeed ask for a fag as soon as we reached him and he smoked it in one drag. He was shaken a bit and quite badly bruised: for most of the descent he was hanging below horizontal and it was only people shouting at him to pull up that brought him round: when he landed his body was just above horizontal.

The CO (LtCol G*******r) wanted to get him onto another herc or balloon that day but he was over-ruled by the medics. The aircrew were fantastic, and the only delay is when the dispatcher realised he had a HUPRA on his hands and told the loady who said something along the lines of "fcuk off" and then saw the static line at the bottom of the door instead of at the top. Took about 2 seconds. The plane then did big banking circles for about 20minutes (I was safely on the ground by this time) to stop the poor lad doing a rivet check. The Tom remembered his drills and didn't pull the reserve and the crabs did everything by the book.

I think other HUPRAs in the world include one by some Zimbabwean and one in Venuzuela.
 
#18
Did he carry on jumping at a later date?

I'm sure i was told on my APJI course but is there a reason (type of plane or parachute?) why we use HUPRA and the French/Germans tow hung-up parachutists back into the aircraft?
 
#19
The Hercs used to have a winch on board but it didn't work or wasn't strong enough (IIRC). I never heard of him jumping again but I left in Dec 2004 to turn into an ARAB.
 
#20
Goose_Rider said:
theparamancan said:
I reckon the Brigade Para Squadron blokes and the whole of PTS are one of the most professional organisations in the military. Everyone takes everything so seriously on this site these days. If i was dangling along behind a C130, the PJI's could take as long as they pleased to sort me out and cut me away!
So why did you post on a public forum that they were flapping on the aircraft then ?

They don't have long to initiate HUPRA procedures in case you are injured, do you think they would attempt to land the a/c with a hung-up parachutist, or do you think they would cut you free regardless of whether they had successfully used the kit ?

Yes I'm being serious, get some sky on your smock and deal with a few dramas yourself and you might take it seriously as well.
Goose-Rider, thanks for your input. My take on the matter is this.

I first came across HUPRA in Jan 1968. It's a first class piece of 'survival' kit. Both aircrew and PJI's train on it very regularly as it is a necessary part of 'Crew Catagorisation' attainment for role. Doesn't mean, for the un-initiated, that a guy has to dangle outside of an aircraft door, for the crew to be declared competent in their drills. There are ways of simulating a 'hung-up parachutist'.
Both the guys on that TA sortie, where HUPRA was effected are first class operators and the top of their profession by any standards. Both Dave and Dutch were former students of mine (such is my age), one an active PJI and the other a PJI who had 're-badged' to ALM.
I know of no 'incident' since 1968 where HUPRA has been used for real in UK Forces, this was the first occasion to my knowledge.

Early training, for the young among you readers, was to recognise a 'hang-up', usually done after the 'stick' has exited and before retrieving the bags. A look out the door would indicate the obvious.

The original drill was then to 'see' if the parachutist was 'alert and seemingly in control'. The despatcher would then 'show' the parachutist the cutting tool, thus indicating that he would be cut free from the main static line cable.

The parachutist would 'indicate' that he understood what was about to happen, by placing both hands on his helmet, and after the cut was made and during the fall away, operate his reserve parachute.

The aircrew control the procedure. The a/c captain would fly the opposite circuit to the door where the parachutist was entrapped. Airspeed, flap settings are adjusted, to ensure that the parachutist is kept clear of the fuselage, while the aircraft gained height.

HUPRA simplified the need to 'operate the reserve' procedures. There will always remain the heart stopping alternative, when a student will panic and operate the reserve parachute anyway.

I know Mick Reeves, who was highlighted in the late '60's. The incident was from a Rapide' used in para mode and where a student had 'hung-up' after exit. Mick 'climbed' down the static line, cut it and subsequently operated the student's reserve. This became an SOP for several years in the sport para world. Mick received an award, justifiably so. He is one of the most professional soldiers I have ever come across for other reasons as well.

I was attached to a French airborne unit when a student was 'hung up' from a Nord Atlas. The French drill in those days, was, as the student appeared unconscious, to land on the grass strip paralleling the runway at minimum safe aircraft landing speed. The student survived but only just. The turbulent slip stream caused him to 'bounce and rotate' on landing and the subsequent friction burns to his unconscious body was nothing ordinary I was told.
 

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