Hundreds of housing associations call on Government to rethink welfare reforms

#1
Hundreds of housing associations are calling on the Government to rethink changes to housing benefit rules that could push many tenants into financial hardship.

The sector is joining forces in a national week of action organised by the National Housing Federation, to raise
awareness of the 'harsh reality' of the Government’s proposed welfare changes.

Key concerns that will be raised by housing associations during Welfare Action Week, starting on October 10, include:

The proposal to cut benefit for social housing tenants deemed to have a ‘spare bedroom’ – even if they have lived in the property for decades.
The decision to cut the housing benefit of an estimated 670,000 people living in social housing by an average of £676 a year.
That the changes will hit people with disabilities hardest. Foster carers will lose out too, even if their ‘spare room’ is being used by fostered children.
The decision by the Government to pay Universal Credit direct to tenants rather than give them the choice to have the housing benefitr element paid direct to their landlord.
The cap on the overall amount of benefit that people can claim. Families will be amongst the hardest hit as the cap takes no account of the huge variation in housing costs across the country.

The Federation claims that as a result of the proposed changes, many tenants will have to choose between going into debt or moving away from work, family and support networks.

The policies are expected to be introduced in April 2013.

Wulvern Housing Group is one of the housing associations taking part in the campaign. It has written to the Welfare Reform Minister, Lord Freud, calling on him to drop the changes.

Simon Wilson, Head of Housing and Customer Service at Wulvern, said: "Wulvern takes the welfare of our tenants very seriously and is concerned that these measures could cause a lot of hardship for a lot of local people.

“The Government must reconsider these proposals immediately. They leave tenants to choose between a rock and a hard place: get into debt or get out of their home.”

Hundreds of housing associations call on Government to rethink welfare reforms » Housing » 24dash.com
 

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#2
It's a load of tosh. The ones that will feel the pinch are the ones subsidised to live in London and major cities. I work in London but can't afford to live there, yet a jobless skank with six kids by 4 dads can.

They just got to move somewhere more reasonably priced or get a job (or eat the kids they can't afford)
 

jarrod248

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#6
In Australia, public housing tenants are looked down on as untermensch, is there the same stigma in the U.K?
No, people who work can't afford such extravagant properties. A newly qualified Nurse, teacher or soldier cannot afford a mortgage in any part of the UK.
If you don't work or are an immigrant it's all nice and free.
 
#7
Well the idea of social housing in the beginning was fantastic. It was to get hard working people out of the slums. To get a flat on an estate in the 1960s required strict criteria. You had to have an impeccable record and a job.
Then the question arose of what to do with the needy and homeless. Only one thing you can do is put them in social housing. The needy were then more of a priority.
What we have now is lots of nice honest people in social housing and a few families who pride themselves on living in a ghetto. They make life hell for the nice people. And the reputation built by the scum sticks to the majority of council tennants.

The dregs on estates really do sap the resources of the government. I like what holland did and built accommodation blocks from
Ship containers. Very cheap and a great incentive to respect what you have and respect your neighbours.
 
#8
No, people who work can't afford such extravagant properties. A newly qualified Nurse, teacher or soldier cannot afford a mortgage in any part of the UK.
If you don't work or are an immigrant it's all nice and free.
Any idea of the average house price in London?
 
#10
It varies depending on number of rooms and borough. £400k for 2 bed flat in islington.

I have seen social housing where the price of the place was £900k and the mum didn't work no father 1 thief of a kid and 3 bedrooms. Bloody nice place.
 
#11
In Australia, public housing tenants are looked down on as untermensch, is there the same stigma in the U.K?
Not really because there was a tradition of local authorities providing high quality housing to working people at reasonable rents.
The issue here is with large numbers of people who don't work and have no intention of working being provided with effectively free housing at great expense.
 
#13
Hang on we've had something like this before.

Isn't the new cap on welfare £500 per household per weak or essentially £2k a month £24k a year. which a working person would probably have to earn closer to £30k get that much after tax its more a week than i live on or any one in my family lives on and they all work full time. so they get no symapthy from me.
Why shouldn't they move to cheaper parts of the country as others have pointed out normal working people can't afford to live in london but permenant dole dossers can and if you work you go to the job it dosn't come to you one of my old school mates recently moved up to newcastle for a job he can't moan about being seperated from family and friends to some bleeding heart fool who sees the situation on a report from a council estate they've never visited.
Its all going mad when working people are expected to tip toe around the wasters they support and no one will acknowledge the elephant in the room
 
#14
No idea at all. Average 2 bedroom terrace house here is about £100k. That's about five times the salary of the people I mentioned.
Very true. But watch and wait, house prices are tumbling in many areas and London house prices will follow.
 
#15
Hang on we've had something like this before.

Isn't the new cap on welfare £500 per household per weak or essentially £2k a month £24k a year. which a working person would probably have to earn closer to £30k get that much after tax its more a week than i live on or any one in my family lives on and they all work full time. so they get no symapthy from me.
Why shouldn't they move to cheaper parts of the country as others have pointed out normal working people can't afford to live in london but permenant dole dossers can and if you work you go to the job it dosn't come to you one of my old school mates recently moved up to newcastle for a job he can't moan about being seperated from family and friends to some bleeding heart fool who sees the situation on a report from a council estate they've never visited.
Its all going mad when working people are expected to tip toe around the wasters they support and no one will acknowledge the elephant in the room
I concur. And because I am a big hearted punctuationaly wealthy b'stard, I will donate a few full stops for you to use at your leisure.

..............................................................................................................................................................................
 
#16
They can get****ed, as far as I'm concerned. The people in question don't work and contribute nothing to society. They have no right to kick off about it. They need to wake up and see their 'rights' for what they are - generosity and good will from the rest of us.

If you don't have a job and your mate is giving you a substantial portion of his wages until you find something, you:

A) Actually look for work
B) Are very grateful
C) Don't kick off when he runs into hard times and has to cut back on your 'allowance' a bit

If only people saw it in those terms, rather than demanding that the all knowing, all powerful Government to sort out every problem they create for themselves.

Also, as long as nobody is starving or freezing, social stigma and hardship is a good thing. It drives people to better themselves.
 
#17
It does seem like a jackboot policy. I can see a principle in getting people to have the living space they need and give up oversized properties for others. However there are loads of other factors in choosing a suitable home & is there any indication there are smaller properties available or larger families looking for homes? Maybe they're just hoping to force the hard up into housing the homeless - that'll work (not!) subletting to a drug addict will really help you out of the poverty trap.

Create some jobs 'n build some homes instead of chucking more cash at the banks that they won't lend to anyone who can actually use it.


Not all social housing tenants are scroungers & this won't discriminate between those that are or aren't.
 
#18
So a minority isn't going to reem the cash cow any more, concerned? No.

Any chance the BBC can fire the multitude of sign language for the death people they have employed currently as well? 1% of the population seems to be involved in 20% of my TV viewing at the moment which I'm not happy about. Oh my bad, we're all equal, just some are more equal than others.
 
#19
It does seem like a jackboot policy.
Giving people £25,000 a year, tax free to rent a house. I don't seem to recall my history teacher mentioning that when we covered the rise of the jackbooted Nazis.

25 grand is about the average wage in this country. Most working people will have to pay tax and NI on that. Then feed themselves, their families and pay the bills before trying to find somewhere to live with what's left.

There are quite a number of people in London who have six figure incomes through welfare and most of that comes through housing benefit. Tens of thousands enjoy a welfare income that's higher than the national average wage and considerably higher than the income of those being taxed to provide the welfare.

The grotesque spectacle of people like Toorpaki Saiedi getting £170,000 a year on welfare while people earning minimum wage are taxed to pay for her to live in a million pound property in Westminster was brought to an end by capping housing benefit at £400 a week. I'm just looking forward to the universal credit being introduced so that nobody's welfare payments can exceed the average wage.

Taxing some of the poorest in society in order to subsidise a millionaire lifestyle for some of the richest 1% is an obscenity that's got more to do with feudalism than Nazi-ism.
 

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