How was Logistics done before the RLC

Heartbreaklane

War Hero
This is all very well and that, but has anyone mentioned yet that the RLC Conductor is the senior soldier in the mob?
 
I have an enduring memory of being accosted by an RMP RSM out side the cook house at Sennelager. The Lt. Col in charge of the Sennelager hunt asked me to collect stale bread from the cook house to feed the ducks on one of the lakes. The Master Chef told me when I asked for the Col's stale bread: "Its all stale when it gets here , mate".

The RMP RSM who accosted me outside the cookhouse told me that I was stealing rations to feed ducks and that the bread should be made into nutritious food like bread pudding and stuffing and things.

The boring cu nt.
Was the RMP RSM wearing circa 1940 BD?
 
Antars
Beavers
SRN 6
LCT
RPL
MEXE
HMAV
Girl Class Tugs
Corporal TEL
B40
TR7RV
BV 202
Michigans
Fiat Allis
Smiths and Rodley
DUKW
WB
Stalwart
10t TTF
Dacone

Close the thread. I am all sad now.
You missed out the bloody great towed conveyor. I had to tow one from Middlesbrough (for 50 Ord) to Catterick along the back roads. God knows how cars travelling in the opposite direction didn't wipe themselves out as the back of the conveyor swung into the opposite carriageway at every bend.
 

Truxx

LE
You missed out the bloody great towed conveyor. I had to tow one from Middlesbrough (for 50 Ord) to Catterick along the back roads. God knows how cars travelling in the opposite direction didn't wipe themselves out as the back of the conveyor swung into the opposite carriageway at every bend.
Must have been before my time. But by all means add it to the list.
 

Benjamin1876

Old-Salt
All the talk about the RLC and the RAOC just reminded me of the "old days". I was RAASC, and in our Transport Company (yes, before they became Transport Squadrons and Troops they were companies and platoons) we had a Composite Platoon, all RAASC except a Cpl and a Pte who were RAAOC, and they looked after ammunition supply issues. and POL was handled by RAASC (we had RAASC Petroleum Platoons) and rations were handled by the Composite Platoon all RAASC, and RAASC Supply Depots in most area, with the bakers and butchers also RAASC, all clerks in headquarters units were RAASC and the RAASC had all the clerical courses which could be attended by soldiers from other Corps, at the RAASC School and at Trades Training Centres in each state. Movements and water transport were handled by RAE (Mov) and RAE (Terminal Operations) and water transport by Small Ships Sqns and Water Transport Platoons. Postal was also RAASC, Cash Offices and Unit Pay clerks were all RAASC, Air Despatch was RAASC, that has all changed and even in Infantry bns now (I don't think this has changed recently), all drivers are RACT. Most RAASC NCOs were of high qualify, so much so that an old friend of mine, now deceased, a RAASC WO2, topped the RSM Course which was conducted by the Infantry Centre, and won the Pace Stick as the most outstanding student on that RSM Course, in 1972. Par Oneri and please ,Wait for the Wagon !!!
 

Benjamin1876

Old-Salt
All the talk about the RLC and the RAOC just reminded me of the "old days". I was RAASC, and in our Transport Company (yes, before they became Transport Squadrons and Troops they were companies and platoons) we had a Composite Platoon, all RAASC except a Cpl and a Pte who were RAAOC, and they looked after ammunition supply issues. and POL was handled by RAASC (we had RAASC Petroleum Platoons) and rations were handled by the Composite Platoon all RAASC, and RAASC Supply Depots in most area, with the bakers and butchers also RAASC, all clerks in headquarters units were RAASC and the RAASC had all the clerical courses which could be attended by soldiers from other Corps, at the RAASC School and at Trades Training Centres in each state. Movements and water transport were handled by RAE (Mov) and RAE (Terminal Operations) and water transport by Small Ships Sqns and Water Transport Platoons. Postal was also RAASC, Cash Offices and Unit Pay clerks were all RAASC, Air Despatch was RAASC, that has all changed and even in Infantry bns now (I don't think this has changed recently), all drivers are RACT. Most RAASC NCOs were of high qualify, so much so that an old friend of mine, now deceased, a RAASC WO2, topped the RSM Course which was conducted by the Infantry Centre, and won the Pace Stick as the most outstanding student on that RSM Course, in 1972. Par Oneri and please ,Wait for the Wagon !!!
 

Cyberhacker

Old-Salt
Mike Dunne, for those of you who never knew him, was a shining example of what we are now missing. Mike was for many years a staff officer in HQ BAOR, latterly as an RO. He used to manage the BAOR stock of vehicle spares, in particular engines and major assemblies in the eightys and ninetys.

His knowledge of his subject, and indeed most aspects of the supply system, was encyclopaedic. He not only knew how "the system" worked, but why it worked and how to fix it when it went wrong. Budgetry contraints apart, the system did work and Op Granby would not have happened the way it did if it were not for his efforts...

His advice was always sound and was saught and heeded at all levels of command. There is a certain young captain who will be forever in debt for the advice and insights into the "dark arts" that were passed on.
RIP Sir.

However this just proves the maxim: the graveyards are full of indispensable people :(
 

HE117

LE
RIP Sir.

However this just proves the maxim: the graveyards are full of indispensable people :(
Agreed, although in Mike's case I am not sure you could ever repeat what he was able to achieve..

Mike's major contribution was to understand the various combinations of vehicle parts and assemblies that could be used to maintain the fleet. He was able to exploit the fact that the MoD sourced its vehicles for many years from a limited number of suppliers. What was not obvious was that the suppliers used a large number of common items sourced from another limited set of sub contractors. Even though new models and updates were being produced, some items were common across a wide range of vehicle types and models.

Mike developed and maintained a large cross reference model that mapped these relationships, so could tell you that the distributor that was used in a Model X Landrover, was also used in a Model Y generator and Model Z trucks made between July 1972 and March 1977. He also used to maintain super-cession chains which mapped the relationships between equivalent part numbers. It was a linked list of part numbers with new stock being procured at the head of the chain, and stock being issued from the tail. If you demanded a part number anywhere in the chain, you would get the oldest equivalent so that obsolescent stock was not left in the system.

This was all done with card indexes and charts (and in his and his minions heads). In a perfect world, manufacturers and procurement staff would have standardised these details, but they didn't and in the case of manufacturers, it was probably not in their interests.

The result of Mike and his minions was that the availability levels of B vehicles in BAOR was always pretty good, and the maintenance costs of the spares holding was minimised. I maintain that this could NOT have been achieved by a civilian contractor, as the aim was not to make money, but to save it and maximise the value to the user. The first objective of a contractor is to make a profit from the client!

I would also say that by abandoning our traditional suppliers, we may have achieved short term procurement gains, but at a huge cost to long term availability and the loss of an irreplaceable spares inventory.

In some countries, such actions would have resulted in heads actually rolling! (other disposal methods available).

To bring this up to date, the only way you prevent Beirut type events happening is by controlling what happens on the ground, and having specialist staff with the knowledge and influence to stop the wrong thing happening. IMHO we have lost a huge amount of this in the Army, and we have been sailing far too close to the wind in recent years! (This is why a Conductor of Stores had and needed their seniority btw! not as a bullshit factor for Tic Toc Badges and Master Drivers..!)
 

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