How to stop LED flicker?

MrBane

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#1
Hi there and welcome to an other episode of DIY Mong, where once again, I have no clue how to resolve an issue, and Google leads me to non-answers.

I've got downlights / spotlights, whatever you want to call them in the kitchen. Six in total, each in a wee alcove of it's own. When I fit the LED's, they start to flicker after a few minutes.

How do I stop this? There's no dimmer switch, and the Halogen trick wouldn't work because they're all on separate wiring thingies (plus there's Halogen already in as I've taken them out as they start to flicker)

Any ideas? I'm ******* hopeless at this. Is there an ELC course for not being a DIY mong?
 
#6
You are Scottish... why are they switched on burning your money like a bonfire in the bank vault?



Regular flicker – heed the warning!

If the reason behind your flickering LEDs is interference or incompatibilty, then the flicker effect will be uneven. But that may not be the problem you’re facing. If your lights are producing a regular, rhythmic flicker (every second, for example) then it’s very likely they are drawing more power than your LED driver is built to supply.
High-quality LED power supplies are designed this way, creating the flicker effect as a warning. Regular flickering indicates that your LEDs require a bigger, higher-spec power supply (or several smaller ones).
Loose wiring and other faulty connections can also cause problems.
 
#7
You are Scottish... why are they switched on burning your money like a bonfire in the bank vault?



Regular flicker – heed the warning!

If the reason behind your flickering LEDs is interference or incompatibilty, then the flicker effect will be uneven. But that may not be the problem you’re facing. If your lights are producing a regular, rhythmic flicker (every second, for example) then it’s very likely they are drawing more power than your LED driver is built to supply.
High-quality LED power supplies are designed this way, creating the flicker effect as a warning. Regular flickering indicates that your LEDs require a bigger, higher-spec power supply (or several smaller ones).
Loose wiring and other faulty connections can also cause problems.
What Happy Nomad said. You have too many LED's on one transformer, come across it all the time in the Trade Show Industry. You can daisy chain two TF's together and spread the lights out through both of them, or if you are unable to daisy chain, running a 2nd box from the main power is your only option.
 
#8
Are the bulbs the dimmable type?

If not then try a dimmable one and see if that flickers. The tad more expensive dimmable one's cope better with various power fluctuations.
 
#9
Hi there and welcome to an other episode of DIY Mong, where once again, I have no clue how to resolve an issue, and Google leads me to non-answers.

I've got downlights / spotlights, whatever you want to call them in the kitchen. Six in total, each in a wee alcove of it's own. When I fit the LED's, they start to flicker after a few minutes.

How do I stop this? There's no dimmer switch, and the Halogen trick wouldn't work because they're all on separate wiring thingies (plus there's Halogen already in as I've taken them out as they start to flicker)

Any ideas? I'm ******* hopeless at this. Is there an ELC course for not being a DIY mong?
Pah, you think you've got problems pal - my water pipe has frozen and burst in the cellar. All I need is a canoe down there and I'm alright.
 

MrBane

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#10
What Happy Nomad said. You have too many LED's on one transformer, come across it all the time in the Trade Show Industry. You can daisy chain two TF's together and spread the lights out through both of them, or if you are unable to daisy chain, running a 2nd box from the main power is your only option.
That's what I don't get though - as it stands for the kitchen, there's only one LED spotlight in out of six, the other 5 are Halogen because they all flickered too, but it's still flickering.

Are the bulbs the dimmable type?

If not then try a dimmable one and see if that flickers. The tad more expensive dimmable one's cope better with various power fluctuations.
No, they're not, I'll grab one tomorrow and give it a try - good idea.

@greyfergie There seems to be a trend with people suggesting I burn this place down....

@FourZeroCharlie I'm surprised myself to be honest. I even managed to wire some fused sockets in the other day, that was.... a challenge.... especially when there were more wires than I'm sure there should have been. I just shoved them all in together and nothing's caught fire yet.
 
#12
That's what I don't get though - as it stands for the kitchen, there's only one LED spotlight in out of six, the other 5 are Halogen because they all flickered too, but it's still flickering.
What happens if you unplug the LED from the transformer ?
What happens if you take 1, 2, or 3 Halogens out?
What happens if you take the LED out and 1 Halogen?
What happens if you just take the LED out?
What is your setup, mains plug to a transformer and then connected out to the lights one x one ?
Test it, test it and test it.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
#13
Right
first of all, were the origional Halogens 12 volt and powered by a transformer ?
are the LED units 240v ?
I have seen people connect the 240v units to the 12V to 50W ac transformers

or have you purchased LED lamps to replace the 30 to 50W 12 volt halogens ?

a clue if they have big clunky terminals GU10 then they run on mains voltages and your led units have an inbuilt power pack
if they are GU4 then they run at around 12 volts and have little pins and are powered by a transformer, the small 2 pin socket on a white flying lead is prone to corrosion and could be the problem
I never convert old Halogens, I rip then out and install a complete LED fitting that is fireproof for obvious reasons ( also stops kitchen smells going upstairs

1549226188679.png



if you have replaced the complete fitting with an LED downlighter like this

1549226429052.png


then move to here !
this is a common problem
for some reason LED lighting switches to fast, that although the loading on the switchgear and Circuit breakers is not as high, it will pick up any loose connections or worn switchgear
first thing is to replace the existing plate switches and see if that cures it, make sure the wires are clean and correctly terminated ( turn of the power first)
next step a bit more scary, turn off the main switch on the consumer unit, remove the lid, and making sure you dont touch the incoming supply cables that should have insulation right up to the main switch but rarely do, undo the wire to the lighting circuit from the mcb, make sure its clean and not burnt or corroded fold it over to allow for a good connection then put it back in and tighten the screw and check its gripped properly
next thing check all the screws along the bottom where the bus bar feeds the MCBs
refit the cover and turn back on
if this does not cure it, then you need to check the junction boxes above the ceiling where the feeds for the old spots were split, they should be accessible and not buried under laminate flooring, again turn the juice off open the boxes up and check the the cables are stripped correctly, are located properly in the joint area and the screw is tight

if that does not cure it then either your supply voltage is a problem or a wiring fault further up
 

MrBane

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#15
@Spank-it @Joshua Slocum I think you're all working with @greyfergie in an effort to get my to either burn my house down or kill myself trying.

I'll take a look over it once I've finished fixing this socket with this fork. Much obliged.

Also, I should add to @Joshua Slocum, replacing originals, no idea where the wires go except into the attic. They're not GU10.. GU5.3? 5.4? The wire has a wee white thingy that looks like it might be a pull apart doodah.
 
#16
Hi there and welcome to an other episode of DIY Mong, where once again, I have no clue how to resolve an issue, and Google leads me to non-answers.

I've got downlights / spotlights, whatever you want to call them in the kitchen. Six in total, each in a wee alcove of it's own. When I fit the LED's, they start to flicker after a few minutes.

How do I stop this? There's no dimmer switch, and the Halogen trick wouldn't work because they're all on separate wiring thingies (plus there's Halogen already in as I've taken them out as they start to flicker)

Any ideas? I'm ******* hopeless at this. Is there an ELC course for not being a DIY mong?

Take all the lamps out, find a original lamp [a working one] and fit it back in, if it doesn't flicker take it
down to a electrical shop and get the same type,
if it still flickers you have two choicers get a lecky man in or move down to Cornwall and I'll fix it for you
a tip for you "make some friends that can help you out in your hour of need":)
 
#17
@Spank-it @Joshua Slocum I think you're all working with @greyfergie in an effort to get my to either burn my house down or kill myself trying.

I'll take a look over it once I've finished fixing this socket with this fork. Much obliged.

Also, I should add to @Joshua Slocum, replacing originals, no idea where the wires go except into the attic. They're not GU10.. GU5.3? 5.4? The wire has a wee white thingy that looks like it might be a pull apart doodah.
Photo's of the "pull apart doodah" & the lamps involved might help....
 
#19
Nick a sparky on something minor and have him bailed to appear at your gaff with tool kit. Mind you I wasnt aware they had electricity in Avemore
 

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