How to "save" the NHS

enpointe

War Hero
Ex no 2 started nursing as an SRN: management instruction to them was never treat or assist outside of the hospital and rota hours.
When I as a pedestrian was hit by a spinning car last Jan, two nurses witnessed it, stayed with me, talked to the bobbles and the paramedic, took me to hospital with Police permission, got me into A&E ahead of the queue but at no time did they examine me or offer me any treatment. I'd err on the side of caution if I was you.
Meh
ex no 2 is a liar

this is factually incorrect , you cannot rely on your workplace insurance to cover you if you do something outside of work, if they were a member of any of the Nursing Unions their insurance via the Union as well as union cover for NMC ( and predecessor bodies) actiosn would apply
 
ex no 2 is a liar

this is factually incorrect , you cannot rely on your workplace insurance to cover you if you do something outside of work, if they were a member of any of the Nursing Unions their insurance via the Union as well as union cover for NMC ( and predecessor bodies) actiosn would apply

Why do you think she is ex-?
 
What's going on with the Ambulance service?

My day job involves patrolling the local city, and we get our fair share of incidents. This year I alone have had six calls to 999 for an ambulance. Generally we've been waiting several hours, around three on average. One call out the ambulance was dispatched from a site 25 miles away, because the local service couldn't get us service.

The other day a couple of my colleagues had someone with a history of heart problems, who pretty much went down the check list of signs of a heart attack, yet they couldn't get an Ambulance and had to wait a bit.

It wasn't this bad before, or even during Covid, so what has changed? What's going on? A worker at a hospital I know has said it's in part about hospitals refusing to take handover from an ambulance so they do not start the 4 hour countdown until they are ready for them, thus ambulances are racked up outside the hospital full of casualties.
 
What's going on with the Ambulance service?

My day job involves patrolling the local city, and we get our fair share of incidents. This year I alone have had six calls to 999 for an ambulance. Generally we've been waiting several hours, around three on average. One call out the ambulance was dispatched from a site 25 miles away, because the local service couldn't get us service.

The other day a couple of my colleagues had someone with a history of heart problems, who pretty much went down the check list of signs of a heart attack, yet they couldn't get an Ambulance and had to wait a bit.

It wasn't this bad before, or even during Covid, so what has changed? What's going on? A worker at a hospital I know has said it's in part about hospitals refusing to take handover from an ambulance so they do not start the 4 hour countdown until they are ready for them, thus ambulances are racked up outside the hospital full of casualties.


Nailed it
 
How to save the NHS? Tear it down and start again.
That'll be £10million in consultation fees please Mr Chancellor.
 

TractorStats

War Hero
The backlog is likely all the people they couldn't be bothered to treat in the last couple of years?
That and the fact that GP surgeries are nearly impossible to access so everyone is just going to A&E because they cant get treatment for things that they would have gone to the GP for. I know there are time wasters who go to A&E but most people are in pain and are ill in some form.

In my view a big reform for the NHS would be shut down all GP surgeries as they aren't really open anyway in most cases. Cancel all the GP contracts and directly employ GPs at 24 hours walk in places in towns and at an A&E triage centre at every hospital. Having a family doctor is a myth anyway. Nobody now sees the same GP twice nowadays. That way no GP waiting for an appointment, no clogging up A&E with people that don't need to be there. Also saves multiple referrals. If you saw a GP at the hospital and needed bloods or a scan get it done there and then come back and see the GP. In London a lot of people cant get on a GP list so they just always go to A&E. Its the reality anyway so lets deal with it.

Add to that a resurrected District nurse service in the community for retired nurses who have left the profession but who have skills to see chronically sick people and just keep an eye on meds, condition any arising issues. Saves a lot of GP visits too.
 
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So why is there suddenly a backlog in A&E, there wasn't one before CV19... it's like the NHS has had is pyrrhic victory, it managed to break itself.

I doubt it has anything to do with the 1 Million plus we have allowed into the country, without derailing the thread or taking this thread off subject, it cannot be ignored that despite the money being thrown at the NHS, most of the planning has been based on legally resident population figures, which we now understand bore no relation to reality.

As with so many things sadly these days its the constant trying to fit quart into pint pot rather than address the actual issues.
 

TractorStats

War Hero
I am going to ask a really stupid question so I am expecting to get properly filled in here. ;)

In a conflict zone how does the RAMC deliver medical services from routine to emergency with very limited resources that is different from the NHS way of doing things? Is there anything we can learn or is it too dissimilar?

I am mainly thinking of the way things are organised and managed rather than actual treatments. At a wild guess I assume the ratio of medical staff to 'management' is far higher in the RAMC than the NHS and where there is 'management' it is mainly medically qualified?
 
The NHS can't be changed until the british people fall out of love with it.
No political party, especially the tories have the guts to truly reform the NHS. All of the mainstream political parties think that it's just easier to throw good money after bad at it. And to hell with the consequences. Even Saint Maggie was scared of it.
People want to believe the myth that the NHS is a free service.
Most people are too stupid to realise that two of three most commonly used parts of the NHS, ie dentistry and opticians you pay for at the point of use.
GP visits will be next.
 
The NHS can't be changed until the british people fall out of love with it.
No political party, especially the tories have the guts to truly reform the NHS. All of the mainstream political parties think that it's just easier to throw good money after bad at it. And to hell with the consequences. Even Saint Maggie was scared of it.
People want to believe the myth that the NHS is a free service.
Most people are too stupid to realise that two of three most commonly used parts of the NHS, ie dentistry and opticians you pay for at the point of use.
GP visits will be next.
They could save a fortune by binning all the " preventive" stuff and just deal with actual, current, injuries and diseases.
 

Tyk

LE
I am going to ask a really stupid question so I am expecting to get properly filled in here. ;)

In a conflict zone how does the RAMC deliver medical services from routine to emergency with very limited resources that is different from the NHS way of doing things? Is there anything we can learn or is it too dissimilar?
Blanket answer is Professionally and as a medical service, not a monumental public service employer.

Not forgetting that mil trained people often have at least a very basic first aid skill, they're typically capable of dealing with a crisis, they've got discipline, good leadership (the number of times I've relied on NCO's to deliver hard bits of projects and they make shit happen fast) and if they haven't got transport immediately available they'll cope to get a casualty where they can get it. Last but not least they're looking after their mates which counts for a lot and that attitude seems to extend to public they come across.

I am mainly thinking of the way things are organised and managed rather than actual treatments. At a wild guess I assume the ratio of medical staff to 'management' is far higher in the RAMC than the NHS and where there is 'management' it is mainly medically qualified?

That's my understanding and I've done a few projects with involvement of UK and NATO medical people. Double hatting as medic and admin at quite elevated ranks seems common.
 
Folks, can anyone offer up real world personal examples of NHS mismanagement or waste for example?
For example; back when I was sparking, my company was working on a NHS contract at a large 'jewel in the crown' type of hospital in London.
I know that food has a lot of rules around it, and that there are stiff penalties for breaching these rules but the level of food waste that I saw, time after time, whilst I worked there made me just that little bit more outraged and sad each passing day.
Cages of sandwiches, fruit, cake type bars were chucked each day.
Why couldn't this be handed over to the homeless I though.
After all, genuinely hungry people wouldn't care if a sandwich was a day out of date.
Fish type sarnies excluded obviously!
 
What's going on with the Ambulance service?

My day job involves patrolling the local city, and we get our fair share of incidents. This year I alone have had six calls to 999 for an ambulance. Generally we've been waiting several hours, around three on average. One call out the ambulance was dispatched from a site 25 miles away, because the local service couldn't get us service.

The other day a couple of my colleagues had someone with a history of heart problems, who pretty much went down the check list of signs of a heart attack, yet they couldn't get an Ambulance and had to wait a bit.

It wasn't this bad before, or even during Covid, so what has changed? What's going on? A worker at a hospital I know has said it's in part about hospitals refusing to take handover from an ambulance so they do not start the 4 hour countdown until they are ready for them, thus ambulances are racked up outside the hospital full of casualties.
why do you think, when the ambulance service is ordering new vehicles, it now gets three gurneys per vehicle instead of one? one in the back, one outside the hospital waiting area and one back at base. If they leave a patient at the hospital on "their" gurney, the hospital won't release it back to the ambulance provider until it has a bed to spare, so you need spare gurneys. Your problems with the NHS are mirrored in Ireland, practically word for word and the underlying problem is that the Govt essentially wants to drive all public patients onto health insurance, just like America, with as little "public" health as they can get away with, so it's cuts all round. Our doctors and nurses can earn more overseas so we have a chronic shortage of them and we import replacements from abroad, with very mixed results.
 
why do you think, when the ambulance service is ordering new vehicles, it now gets three gurneys per vehicle instead of one? one in the back, one outside the hospital waiting area and one back at base. If they leave a patient at the hospital on "their" gurney, the hospital won't release it back to the ambulance provider until it has a bed to spare, so you need spare gurneys. Your problems with the NHS are mirrored in Ireland, practically word for word and the underlying problem is that the Govt essentially wants to drive all public patients onto health insurance, just like America, with as little "public" health as they can get away with, so it's cuts all round. Our doctors and nurses can earn more overseas so we have a chronic shortage of them and we import replacements from abroad, with very mixed results.
So how do we fix it? Can't keep throwing money at it.
 

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