Builds how to make your own display cases

#1
to keep dust and little itchy fingers away from your delicate models a glass case can enclose, encapsulate and protect you fine work. a case shouldn't cost more than £10 for small to medium size (£2 per piece) or £20 for a 1/72 flower class corvette size (£4 per piece of glass)
First seek out your local glass cutter, only order 3mm thickness glass as any thinner will be in danger of breaking and any thicker will be too heavy and refract light too widely in such a small viewing space. always measure in mm or cm but not both. When you call in the order have it written down clearly, remember to add 6mm to the length of the lid to overlap the end pieces.

when you collect the glass, hold it together to check what goes where, long before you introduce any glue, hold the pieces together with masking tape.

I use Serious Glue from B&Q, but any glue showing glass on the packaging should do the job. apply the glue using a cocktail stick to avoid dribbles and too much that squidges out when you sandwich it between close fitting glass edges. Watch out for sticky glue fingers leaving fingerprints in the glass, as they are tough to shift with a scalpel or stanley blade.
 
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#2
hold the edges together with masking tape and use a right angle set square to ensure the glass sets at the right angles.

the above picture demonstrates why you order the lid 6mm longer than the side pieces, so that it overlaps the end pieces.
the base is simply made from cardboard, cut to size using the glass dome as a template, then glued on the bottom edges, this is the final step so ensure everything is squared away and that all the figures ect in the model are standing upright, once the base is glued on, it's a pain to untac it to make corrections.
 
#3
start with something small, like a single figure diorama or a single vehicle, even a Gray Ferguson tractor. Work your way up to larger models.


a glass case keeps the dust and fingers out and adds a touch of class to an already classy piece of work.
 

MrBane

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#4
Do you envisage any issues in doing something similar for smaller models like figurines etc? Can glass cutters pretty much do any size or is there usually a minimum length etc?
 
#5
Do you envisage any issues in doing something similar for smaller models like figurines etc? Can glass cutters pretty much do any size or is there usually a minimum length etc?
It will be down to what you can negotiate with your local glass cutter, but I can't see that being much of a problem, for tiny cases you might go for glass thinner than 3mm.
 
#6
Do you envisage any issues in doing something similar for smaller models like figurines etc? Can glass cutters pretty much do any size or is there usually a minimum length etc?
You can get pre made ones for figures, failing that, charity shops often have knickknack's that could be turned into covered bases with a little bit of fettling
 

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