How To Fix 'The North'?

Surely it would be better to take a swing at the thing with the walking stick, show it who is boss.
This one would have scared the crap out of it
Bird on a cane.jpg
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
I think within 20 years, the entire building industry will have been transformed by automation. There will, of course, still be manual work on the legacy building stock, but quite a lot of that can be semi-automated. It’s perfectly possible today to measure up a job with laser etc, input the cuts etc into a machone

On the other hand, we’ll see jobs created feeding machines.


So design a plug that can be wired by machine. I fully expect to see new buildings wired with factory manufactured wiring looms.
That was being done in the 1950s, making pre fab wiring looms for new houses was the first job my Dad took after national service. Apparently the dullest, most repetitive job he ever did, he lasted two months whilst looking for another gig.
 
Disclaimer: I was born & bred in That There London. Everywhere else just seems so...small! For both good & bad.
I love the fact that it's a ramshackle collection of streets & districts (Stoke on Trent, on the other hand, is also 5 towns...but they're all sh1te. Worst accent outside Zafrica. Beer's OK).
Apart from the very first & last, no bugger bothers with a bus or tube timetable (trains moreso, a bit)
There are many, many foul pits still, though.
At the risk of being an arrse (anyone that says that is already too late), there's always something different. You might not be able to afford it, mind. I'm not central, but there (are/were) about 120 restaurants I can walk to in about 30 mins at a trot.

I liked Sheffield & Glasgow for a few weeks, Leeds OK, lived in Manchester for a bit, but it & Liverpool hyped, Chester, ... Cardiff had potential (apart from the locals, obviously), Coventry? Visiting Bradford & Blackpool was interesting. Cambridge & Oxford - daytrip only. Cambridgeshire? Urgh.
Newcastle I liked, even Sunderland & Middlesborough were interesting.
Cornwall? Not a great bunch of lads, frankly. I felt very conscious of my wallet. Lovely countryside. Similarly Yorkshire (gawd knows where..Bingley? Skipton? and some other places).
Peak District nice, Lake District full of knobs & tourists.
If I live in a city, it might as well be the nastiest shitty one about. If I had a choice, I'd either live nearer to the folks north of London or in a large shack with a tractor & chainsaw 1/2 a mile from anyone - either of which would take some serious cash.

Having said all that: mates moved to the countryside, got involved, life is good. I am more sympathetic to gardening vegetables & whittling & decent walks for dogs. Going for a swift half is still a 15 min drive and that ain't rock & roll.

How things will change is interesting - a good part of the compensation for business meetings is the location - face to face is still a good thing, every now & again. The spectacle of a feed overlooking the Thames, Seine, Rhine, Po, Bosphorous, Auckland Harbour, Manley, even Times Sq (and some place in Chicago)...terribly wasteful of course.
 
Disclaimer: I was born & bred in That There London. Everywhere else just seems so...small! For both good & bad.
I love the fact that it's a ramshackle collection of streets & districts (Stoke on Trent, on the other hand, is also 5 towns...but they're all sh1te. Worst accent outside Zafrica. Beer's OK).
Apart from the very first & last, no bugger bothers with a bus or tube timetable (trains moreso, a bit)
There are many, many foul pits still, though.
At the risk of being an arrse (anyone that says that is already too late), there's always something different. You might not be able to afford it, mind. I'm not central, but there (are/were) about 120 restaurants I can walk to in about 30 mins at a trot.

I liked Sheffield & Glasgow for a few weeks, Leeds OK, lived in Manchester for a bit, but it & Liverpool hyped, Chester, ... Cardiff had potential (apart from the locals, obviously), Coventry? Visiting Bradford & Blackpool was interesting. Cambridge & Oxford - daytrip only. Cambridgeshire? Urgh.
Newcastle I liked, even Sunderland & Middlesborough were interesting.
Cornwall? Not a great bunch of lads, frankly. I felt very conscious of my wallet. Lovely countryside. Similarly Yorkshire (gawd knows where..Bingley? Skipton? and some other places).
Peak District nice, Lake District full of knobs & tourists.
If I live in a city, it might as well be the nastiest shitty one about. If I had a choice, I'd either live nearer to the folks north of London or in a large shack with a tractor & chainsaw 1/2 a mile from anyone - either of which would take some serious cash.

Having said all that: mates moved to the countryside, got involved, life is good. I am more sympathetic to gardening vegetables & whittling & decent walks for dogs. Going for a swift half is still a 15 min drive and that ain't rock & roll.

How things will change is interesting - a good part of the compensation for business meetings is the location - face to face is still a good thing, every now & again. The spectacle of a feed overlooking the Thames, Seine, Rhine, Po, Bosphorous, Auckland Harbour, Manley, even Times Sq (and some place in Chicago)...terribly wasteful of course.
EDIT: apologies for showoff arsiness
 

RGMugabe

Swinger
Worldwide working from home has seen people's real working hours increase, once employers latch onto this they might have a lightbulb moment and think working from home, this could work
The problem with working from home is home could be islamabad,Mumbai or Johannesburg. Anywhere with a cheaper workforce. The law of unintended consequences.
 
The problem with working from home is home could be islamabad,Mumbai or Johannesburg. Anywhere with a cheaper workforce. The law of unintended consequences.
I think I've mentioned it before but a firm I used to work for sent some CAD work to the Far East, Malaysia, it was many, many years ago. Weeks later we got the drawings back. All wrong to the extent it was quicker to redo them ourselves from scratch rather than enter into email ping-pong with the foreigners to try to get them fixed. The foreign CAD office idea quickly got binned by management. Then there was the time a separate firm sent stuff to India.

The law of unintended consequences works in mysterious ways...
 
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The problem with working from home is home could be islamabad,Mumbai or Johannesburg. Anywhere with a cheaper workforce. The law of unintended consequences.

I used to think that, but I've found no problem getting home based IT work, it's more entry level it gets awkward and you need talent to be coming through

I don't think IT is seen as the big thing to do anymore, not when kids can earn money literally playing games for a living
 
This is a massive challenge to solve; we’re in the early stages of the fourth industrial revolution.
Much of this provides opportunities, but it’s got the potential to leave a lot of people behind too. I think there needs to be a very serious debate about what we want from education.
True, it has always been a problem to give kids the skills to do jobs that as yet, don’t exist. This doesn’t stop old gimmers (of all ages) moaning that ‘kids these days don’t know who was the 5th wife of Henry viii.
 
True, it has always been a problem to give kids the skills to do jobs that as yet, don’t exist. This doesn’t stop old gimmers (of all ages) moaning that ‘kids these days don’t know who was the 5th wife of Henry viii.
IMHO the challenge is to inspire kids to be inquiring and creative with plenty of STEM thrown in. Surely it’s more exciting creating stuff than reading dead poets?
 
creating stuff than reading dead poets?
Oh I agree, I mean we can hardly have the London Massiff reading "I wandered lonely as a cloud,,"
response " Wot cloud's that man , have a spliff and chill
True, it has always been a problem to give kids the skills to do jobs that as yet, don’t exist.
That sir, has always been a problem, short of Tailoring, cheffing, carpentry and the usual. They can't all be Richard Branson's or Tesla's- it's just not fair.
 
IMHO the challenge is to inspire kids to be inquiring and creative with plenty of STEM thrown in. Surely it’s more exciting creating stuff than reading dead poets?
Yebbut.. poetry books are cheap compared with delivering meaningful STEM, besides which, there isn’t the expertise around anymore to deliver it. Anyone with the appropriate skills and knowledge isn’t interested in Gender Pronoun training...

also available in cynical...
 

endure

GCM
IMHO the challenge is to inspire kids to be inquiring and creative with plenty of STEM thrown in. Surely it’s more exciting creating stuff than reading dead poets?

A mate of mine runs one and there's a queue of kids a mile long waiting to sign up (Covid permitting).
 
Whilst I agree with everything you say, there has to be consideration for the non-academic students (you know, the thick ones) who can never master the high Tech skills to succeed in the way you are indicating. Plumbers, carpenters, builders, are all traditional ways for these people to succeed as adults (I'm not saying all bog mechanics, chippies and brick slappers are thick, just a fair proportion of them)
A kid I used to teach; shallow ender with plenty of ‘got up and went’ was placed with a picking and packing company on work experience. At the end of the 2 weeks, he had reorganised the warehouse, developed an efficient accounting scheme and had a job offer.
Back in school - head down on desk running down the clock...
Kid next door; in school he was looking up to see the fish... apprenticed to a plumber and is now happy to sit in a puddle all day, in a couple of years he’ll be coining it in.

Horses/courses... the sooner Education Ministers learn to leave the job to the people that understand it, the better.
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
A kid I used to teach; shallow ender with plenty of ‘got up and went’ was placed with a picking and packing company on work experience. At the end of the 2 weeks, he had reorganised the warehouse, developed an efficient accounting scheme and had a job offer.
Back in school - head down on desk running down the clock...
Kid next door; in school he was looking up to see the fish... apprenticed to a plumber and is now happy to sit in a puddle all day, in a couple of years he’ll be coining it in.

Horses/courses... the sooner Education Ministers learn to leave the job to the people that understand it, the better.
I agree with your first paragraphs, but the last line... I am concerned that the politics of educators would result in the wholesale de-emphasis of STEM subjects in favour of humanities subjects, which is the comfort zone of the majority of teachers.

IMHO,Education is far too important for its strategic direction to be left in the hands of teachers. We vote ministers in, we can vote them out if they're crap (or at least their departure can be forced by public opinion). It's a damn sight more difficult to get rid of a head teacher.
 
I agree with your first paragraphs, but the last line... I am concerned that the politics of educators would result in the wholesale de-emphasis of STEM subjects in favour of humanities subjects, which is the comfort zone of the majority of teachers.

IMHO,Education is far too important for its strategic direction to be left in the hands of teachers. We vote ministers in, we can vote them out if they're crap (or at least their departure can be forced by public opinion). It's a damn sight more difficult to get rid of a head teacher.
’Humanities’ is generally History, Geography and RE. It’s a small part of the curriculum compared to English, maths and science. Teachers train to teach their specialist subjects and usually have the corresponding degree - that is their ‘comfort zone’, a Science teacher would regard being taken to cover an RE lesson as heresy...

Sure, we can vote out ministers, but not until they’ve spent 4 or 5 years (most of a student‘s secondary education) screwing it up. A form teacher probably spends an hour or more a day with a kid in it’s natural environment (and compares notes with subject teachers), compare this the the (average) 45mins that a father does, or however long a minister does and it’s plain who knows what’s going on.
 
The problem with working from home is home could be IslamabadBurnley,Mumbai Carlisle or Johannesburg Newcastle. Anywhere with a cheaper workforce. The law of unintended consequences.
You make a very, very interesting point. I know of two UK civil servants (a couple) who are operating from Perth, Australia (having been stuck out there for a year) and attend the daily stand-ups and the occasional online meetings, but happily continue to do their policy work from 10,000 miles away. They were out to see the elderly parents of one of them and decided that it was probably better to stay close, knowing that returning to the UK on re-pat flights would be a one-way journey.


One consultancy I was working with had its legal department in New Zealand. Documents, contracts etc would be sent to NZ and looked at overnight and prepared for first thing the following morning in the UK. Money was saved both in salaries and in using 'down time'.
 
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Sure, we can vote out ministers, but not until they’ve spent 4 or 5 years (most of a student‘s secondary education) screwing it up
Pretty much sums up my academic experience in this country. 58-68. Harold's "White heat of technology" was last seen disappearing down a corridor under a haze of weed.
 

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