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How To Fix 'The North'?

Over the past few days, I’ve been reading up on the Lord Kerslow headed UK2070 Commission’s findings.
It has produced various reports, which you can download from here - Publications | The UK2070 Commission and they produce some quite shocking results. It is far easier to read these two articles to get an idea of the content:

The government must invest in the North | Public Finance

North-south divide is now so bad it's like 'Germany at the end of the Cold War'


Essentially, the govt (of various types) has had a policy when it came to capital projects in that there must he a positive return. This favoured London and the SE over the north with the gap widening as more money was spent making the south ‘nice’ via the public purse, whilst the north has suffered, while still paying for the south to be nicer, well as nice as a selfish, pollution ridden expensive, unfriendly and over expensive region can be, and this has been going on for so long now (many decades) that there has been little to no investment in areas of northern England and has almost become an official policy to not invest outside of the London\southern bubble.
Lord Kerslow has even said that due to this policy the north and south gap has resulted in a situation very similar to the old East and West Germany when the wall came down when it comes to economic and life differences.

I know Boris has laid out his plan to ditch this clearly failing policy and begin investment in the north, but what I’d like to figure out is, where to begin?
I mean we’ve had almost two generations here now since the heavy industry began to be stripped out and closed down and many towns live in a permanent state of ‘bleak’.
It’s not as if there are not decent jobs up here, there are and many of my friends are engineers (proper ones!) or in other professional roles, but there seems little else for those not so inclined. Public transport outside of major cities is variable and the lack of investment in transport is visible.
They are building a new bypass here on the western edge of Preston which will link Blackpool Road to the M55. This was originally planned to be built in the 70’s! The M55 currently has junction one at Preston and Junction 3 at Kirkham. Junction 2 was never built. But now they are. 45 years late!

Sensible answers only please, but I’m damned if I know where to start without Manchester, Leeds etc. swallowing up any investment and just recreating the problem all over again.
 
Over the past few days, I’ve been reading up on the Lord Kerslow headed UK2070 Commission’s findings.
It has produced various reports, which you can download from here - Publications | The UK2070 Commission and they produce some quite shocking results. It is far easier to read these two articles to get an idea of the content:

The government must invest in the North | Public Finance

North-south divide is now so bad it's like 'Germany at the end of the Cold War'


Essentially, the govt (of various types) has had a policy when it came to capital projects in that there must he a positive return. This favoured London and the SE over the north with the gap widening as more money was spent making the south ‘nice’ via the public purse, whilst the north has suffered, while still paying for the south to be nicer, well as nice as a selfish, pollution ridden expensive, unfriendly and over expensive region can be, and this has been going on for so long now (many decades) that there has been little to no investment in areas of northern England and has almost become an official policy to not invest outside of the London\southern bubble.
Lord Kerslow has even said that due to this policy the north and south gap has resulted in a situation very similar to the old East and West Germany when the wall came down when it comes to economic and life differences.

I know Boris has laid out his plan to ditch this clearly failing policy and begin investment in the north, but what I’d like to figure out is, where to begin?
I mean we’ve had almost two generations here now since the heavy industry began to be stripped out and closed down and many towns live in a permanent state of ‘bleak’.
It’s not as if there are not decent jobs up here, there are and many of my friends are engineers (proper ones!) or in other professional roles, but there seems little else for those not so inclined. Public transport outside of major cities is variable and the lack of investment in transport is visible.
They are building a new bypass here on the western edge of Preston which will link Blackpool Road to the M55. This was originally planned to be built in the 70’s! The M55 currently has junction one at Preston and Junction 3 at Kirkham. Junction 2 was never built. But now they are. 45 years late!

Sensible answers only please, but I’m damned if I know where to start without Manchester, Leeds etc. swallowing up any investment and just recreating the problem all over again.

Fix the North?

A BFO canal between the Wash and the River Severn...:)
 
Manchester, Liverpool, and to a lesser extent Leeds have been tech hubs, there is work there, and it's the sort of work we as a nation do well, so for it to flourish outside of London means the demand is there

As driving to those places is a mare in rush hour, anything to improve public transports into those areas and making commuting easier and more affordable would be one move

Something the government has said they will address, but the investment hasn't happened yet
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
The simple answer is to permit fracking and re-establish an energy industry in the part of the country that was originally built on having an energy industry.

It would also have the entirely satisfactory result of greater energy self-sufficiency and reducing energy imports, particularly from such kindly and freedom-loving locations as Qatar.
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Much of the issue is down to both Parties when they were in power. Both saw the meaning of capital spending is that it should be done in or around the Capital - London! :)
 
Manchester, Liverpool, and to a lesser extent Leeds have been tech hubs, there is work there, and it's the sort of work we as a nation do well, so for it to flourish outside of London means the demand is there

As driving to those places is a mare in rush hour, anything to improve public transports into those areas and making commuting easier and more affordable would be one move

Something the government has said they will address, but the investment hasn't happened yet
I don't think it's helped in that they have been electrifying quite a few of the 'smaller' railway lines around here in the past few years, but it all seems to be in a way that makes the other towns in the NW feeders for Manchester.
Liverpool has a HUGE problem when it comes to rail communting from outside of Liverpool, due to Merseyside (once devolved from Lancashire in the 70's) forming their own rail network and physically dividing the lines between the nationional rail network and their own in many places. The only way you can really get into Liverpool from the national network is to Lime Street and on trains that are a pain to catch and slow.
 
The simple answer is to permit fracking and re-establish an energy industry in the part of the country that was originally built on having an energy industry.

It would also have the entirely satisfactory result of greater energy self-sufficiency and reducing energy imports, particularly from such kindly and freedom-loving locations as Qatar.
Genuine question, is there a possibility of economically feasible fracking in the north of England?

I suppose, as you say, a region that once was the centre of the world's manufacturing industry because it sat on a ginormous stock of readily available fossil fuel must have something there, but how would it compare say with the tar sands of Canada? Is there really potential for economic fracking?

As I say, it's a genuine question, I had no idea there was any real potential there.
 
Move a few government departments up there and actually build and deliver the green projects there rather than awarding contracts to Danish/German companies.
 
Genuine question, is there a possibility of economically feasible fracking in the north of England?

I suppose, as you say, a region that once was the centre of the world's manufacturing industry because it sat on a ginormous stock of readily available fossil fuel must have something there, but how would it compare say with the tar sands of Canada? Is there really potential for economic fracking?

As I say, it's a genuine question, I had no idea there was any real potential there.
Put it this way, the site in Lancashire was about 10 mins from my house and everyone local wanted it. The 'protesters' were basically a rent-a-mob of people from a large distance away. By all accounts, Greenpeace were paying for them to be naughty.
The only 'locals' were from nearby villages (I say nearby, there were somtimes miles away) concerned about their house price. In fact, many were not even from Lancashire orginally and had blagged large affordable houses with their ill-gotten southern gains.
The site itself was small and if you drive past it now you'd never notice it unless you knew where to look.
 

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
Put it this way, the site in Lancashire was about 10 mins from my house and everyone local wanted it. The 'protesters' were basically a rent-a-mob of people from a large distance away. By all accounts, Greenpeace were paying for them to be naughty.
The only 'locals' were from nearby villages (I say nearby, there were somtimes miles away) concerned about their house price. In fact, many were not even from Lancashire orginally and had blagged large affordable houses with their ill-gotten southern gains.
The site itself was small and if you drive past it now you'd never notice it unless you knew where to look.
is it functioning now?
 

RBMK

LE
Book Reviewer
Very deep canal across the country to the North of Birmingham. Don't want Brummies in the North.

On the north side of the canal a deep trench full of punji sticks and razor barb.

100m gap with tank traps and mines

50m high wall with Gimpys, LAWs etc on the top

That'll keep those b**dy Southerners in their place.
 
is it functioning now?
In answer to your previous question - nobody knows for sure. Without a series of fracking and flow tests it is not really possible to know for certain whether there are economically recoverable reserves there.

I'm not sure how you mean to compare the shale reserves in Northern England to Canadian tar sands. If the shale reserves in N. England can be economically recovered, it can be done with very moderate environmental impact, which is just the opposite of producing from tar sands.
 
How to fix the North? Some sort of pneumatic GWAR with a penchant for leather clothing apparently. Works for me.

maxresdefault.jpg
 
I don't think it's helped in that they have been electrifying quite a few of the 'smaller' railway lines around here in the past few years, but it all seems to be in a way that makes the other towns in the NW feeders for Manchester.
Liverpool has a HUGE problem when it comes to rail communting from outside of Liverpool, due to Merseyside (once devolved from Lancashire in the 70's) forming their own rail network and physically dividing the lines between the nationional rail network and their own in many places. The only way you can really get into Liverpool from the national network is to Lime Street and on trains that are a pain to catch and slow.

I know they're talking of opening a line from north wales to Liverpool, rather than going via chester

Trying to drive in is painful, so faster train times would be nice
 
The north is fine its the people that need fixing.
Inherently lazy and distrustful unkempt and surly. always looking to blame the south for their own failure.
Whats the solution #NLM? 3rd world issues.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
Genuine question, is there a possibility of economically feasible fracking in the north of England?

I suppose, as you say, a region that once was the centre of the world's manufacturing industry because it sat on a ginormous stock of readily available fossil fuel must have something there, but how would it compare say with the tar sands of Canada? Is there really potential for economic fracking?

As I say, it's a genuine question, I had no idea there was any real potential there.

It's been over five years but the quick answer then was yes and very little's changed - if anything gas processing has become even more sophisticated. The UK could also develop a very lucrative supplier and contractor sector too, particular in the design and manufacture of drilling rigs more appropriate to European conditions. It needs political will though and Boris is signed up to his green fantasies.
 

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