How to Cas Sim an Acid Attack?

#21
I once found myself responsible for the safety issues of using a large quantity of hydrofluoric acid at a resuscitated mine ... The new GM at that mine (a Denver School of Mines PhD) had proposed using the stuff in open reactor containers with a gas extractor hood over them, attended by unprotected diamond sorters. Sometimes I worry.
Having been careful to double check which forum this was in, JESUS ****!

Whole vats of HF? That bloke was either a ******* moron, a ******* sociopath or both. I have worked with some unpleasant stuff but didn't go near HF if there was someone stupider/braver/more experienced willing to do so. The worst bit is that HF is actually a pretty poor acid in conventional terms so it doesn't feel like it's burning. Until several hours / a day later, as the fluoride strips the calcium from your bones.

I'm glad you managed to change the situation as I shivered when I read your post.
 
#22
Having been careful to double check which forum this was in, JESUS ****!

Whole vats of HF? That bloke was either a ******* moron, a ******* sociopath or both. I have worked with some unpleasant stuff but didn't go near HF if there was someone stupider/braver/more experienced willing to do so. The worst bit is that HF is actually a pretty poor acid in conventional terms so it doesn't feel like it's burning. Until several hours / a day later, as the fluoride strips the calcium from your bones.

I'm glad you managed to change the situation as I genuinely shivered when I read your post.
He claimed that he had previously used such a system, and I remember him saying that the operators may have sniffed it, but there weren't any lasting effects. He was an old Rhodie who had come out of retirement in SA for the cash; his daughter would have been the overseeing sorter in that room. His CV (I filched it from the system; it was, as all engineer CVs are, spreadsheeted) showed a long and distinguished career in gold, copper and industrial minerals, but not diamonds.

In his proposed system, the acid would have been boiling, by the way. Fine with HCl in an enclosed, filtered, properly vented system, which is the way most diamond mines operate the final process, but his proposal was a stairway to Heaven for my taste. Unfortunately, he was Authority at that mine, but if the change hadn't been made we might have had unpleasantness. One of my minor triumphs; as I said, Sometimes I Worry.
 
#24
He claimed that he had previously used such a system, and I remember him saying that the operators may have sniffed it, but there weren't any lasting effects.
Not what you are saying but his idea, bollocks! At the very least they will have had an itchy nose as the cartilage was gradually broken down.

In his proposed system, the acid would have been boiling, by the way.
I refer you to my previous comment, JESUS ****! Just the boiling issue, ignoring HF losses to the contained atmosphere, would give anyone in the UK a H&S heart attack.
 
#25
ignoring HF losses to the contained atmosphere, would give anyone in the UK a H&S heart attack.
That's the African mining industries for you. Well, most of them; SA, Botswana, Kenya, Nigeria and Ghana have been quicker than many of the other countries in updating their methods. The rest, if operating under local management and under local laws, have been fairly relaxed about impacting royalty payments to their Governments. My experience above was in Zimbabwe, but it was untested in law - the Ministry had no clue - and many of our devilish practices, such as X-ray screening of employees*, were brought into the Ministry's regulations after we introduced them in 2004/5.

*...which was a whole new, highly entertaining episode, as you can imagine.
 
#26
My personal favourite is not an acid, bromine triflouride, we used it to cut stuck drill pipe and well tubing, not for the faint of heart!
Just out of interest, how did you actually use BF3? We had LiAlH4 and that was kept in very small bottles dissolved in a flammable solvent.

Not as much fun as t-BuLi was, squirt that and it immediately caught fire in air. Not that I'm dragging this off-topic or anything.
 
#27
Just out of interest, how did you actually use BF3? We had LiAlH4 and that was kept in very small bottles dissolved in a flammable solvent.

Not as much fun as t-BuLi was, squirt that and it immediately caught fire in air. Not that I'm dragging this off-topic or anything.
Came in 3 foot long 2 inch diameter steel tubes, screwed on to a copper cutting head with x amount of circumferential holes. On the top end, a series of Chambers filled with solid rocket propellant and ignitor, under a collar locator. The chemical tube had a piston at the top end, on ignition the pressure generated would force it out in 360 degree cutting jet.

Surface effect

 
#28
Came in 3 foot long 2 inch diameter steel tubes, screwed on to a copper cutting head with x amount of circumferential holes. On the top end, a series of Chambers filled with solid rocket propellant and ignitor, under a collar locator. The chemical tube had a piston at the top end, on ignition the pressure generated would force it out in 360 degree cutting jet.
Sounds awesome but I wouldn't have wanted to be nearby :)
 
#35
The actual zone would likely be 500 ish metres down hole.
I'm not arguing that the actual version wouldn't be properly impressive, just that the water pistol isn't the same as BF3 being poked hard enough to become annoyed

Edit - related degree, any jobs going?
 
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#37
It's a difficult thing to treat as well.

I remember first aid kits having specialist applications for hydrofluric acid which is transmitted up bones causing particularly bad damage. It was apparently a common injury at RTC 's.

As to the rest of treatment, I dimly remember copious irrigation, followed by dry dressing and covering with cling film for sterility.

But this is going off memories of years ago, when my IA drill was "stick a plaster on it, bwtty - and call for Ambo".
 

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