How to Cas Sim an Acid Attack?

#1
Can anyone suggest a good way to simulate the wounds from an acid attack?

I'm laying on another cas sim first aid exercise, and I thought I'd try something a little harder than just painting someone red.
 
#3
Acid "burns" flesh by causing fluids in the flesh to heat up to boiling point so a fresh acid wound looks similar to a very bad scald.
 

Sarastro

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#5
Thank you Bollox. vasaline as burn blisters it is then.
Good idea, particularly given how common it is in areas people might go. But you should be aware that the effect of most acid attacks isn't instant, it's an ongoing injury that gets worse the longer it is left. So, depending on your scenario, might be worth considering a point of injury scenario driven by the casualty describing symptoms and where the injury develops, rather than a static "here's a bloke who has acid burns" one.

Since it's not really trained either, there are lots of resources about how to deal with them online.
 
#8
there was one featured on the news this week- so has been done, it simulated an acid attack in a nightclub - maybe ask the police?
 
#9
Acid "burns" flesh by causing fluids in the flesh to heat up to boiling point so a fresh acid wound looks similar to a very bad scald.
Yes but there's a bit more. The acid used most commonly in these attacks seems to be sulfuric acid.

Concentrated sulfuric has a variety of nasty effects. First, it is a really potent dehydrating agent so it will literally rip the water out of skin cells and even molecules inside those cells. Just as a demo, this is someone adding conc sulfuric to sugar (C12H22O11) - the acid rips the hydrogen and oxygen out as water and leaves almost pure carbon behind.

The heat comes as the sulfuric acid dissolves in the water produced as the reaction is extremely exothermic, hence the old memory aide, "Do as you oughta, add acid to water". Adding conc sulfuric to large volumes of water is safe enough providing you give the mixture time to cool down. Dropping water into concentrated acid is a Bad Idea as the water boils, spraying acid all round the room.

Finally, the diluted (but still nastier than what's found in a car battery) acid starts to denature the proteins in the skin so even when the heat has been removed the skin is still being destroyed. I did see someone in a 6th form experiment put a single drop of conc sulfuric on their skin deliberately. Despite flushing the area with water almost immediately they still developed a 50p sized blister. In hindsight, the Emperor may have been paying them a visit at the time and it wasn't me (for once).

Incidentally, washing the acid off with water will generate more heat immediately, hence the usual advice for chemical burns to flood the area with running cold water.


Of course, there's always other chemicals available for the budding psychopath. Concentrated nitric acid is a powerful oxidising agent, caustic soda will turn the fats in skin and eyes into soap and there's some seriously nasty effects of hydrofluoric acid essentially dissolving bones from the inside. Truly the weapon of an utter ****.
 
Last edited:
#10
use ugly people to begin with
 
#11
to get a good fizzing reaction effect we used soluble fizzy tablets, ground up and sprinkled on damp burns effect skin. (mostly made from White and yellow soft parrafin, black and red make up stick, some burned tissue paper, ash.. all sorts really. Cling film over WSP is good for blisters if you don't want them breaking too easily.

If I can find it I'll bung up a copy of my cas sim guide I made a while ago - actually you should still have a copy of it from the training session where the ladies all went bonkers with blood, wounds, blood, clothing and blood....
 
#13
to get a good fizzing reaction effect we used soluble fizzy tablets, ground up and sprinkled on damp burns effect skin. (mostly made from White and yellow soft parrafin, black and red make up stick, some burned tissue paper, ash.. all sorts really. Cling film over WSP is good for blisters if you don't want them breaking too easily.

If I can find it I'll bung up a copy of my cas sim guide I made a while ago - actually you should still have a copy of it from the training session where the ladies all went bonkers with blood, wounds, blood, clothing and blood....
Hello! I thought I'd lost touch with you! I tried inviting you to a party a while ago and couldn't get through to you! Yes, Arrsers, the original phantom missed an opportunity to party.

I do still have your guide. Very stained now, as it is constantly referred to. Thank you.
 
#14
Hello! I thought I'd lost touch with you! I tried inviting you to a party a while ago and couldn't get through to you! Yes, Arrsers, the original phantom missed an opportunity to party.

I do still have your guide. Very stained now, as it is constantly referred to. Thank you.
I'll send you the PDF of the original if you like.

I think I know when that was - I wasn't terribly well and wasn't coping with life in general. Quitting that ghastly job in Ewell helped alot.
 
#15
I was about to suggest that you use real acid on a couple of pikeys from the nearby garbage dump, but that would have ruined your training event: why would anyone move to help a pikey covered in acid (apart from to get more acid)?
 
#16
Get yourself down to a tanning salon in Liverpool. Women there pay handsomely to look like a burns victim. If they've also had lip filler, you won't need to simulate blistering.

 
#17
Get yourself down to a tanning salon in Liverpool. Women there pay handsomely to look like a burns victim. If they've also had lip filler, you won't need to simulate blistering.

I thought that was a Barbie type doll when I first looked. Are you sure it's still human?
 
#18
@theoriginalphantom Off-topic, in my misspent youth I was told very clearly by a burns unit nuse (in the tone of voice suggesting she wanted to smack me round the ear) that one should never apply a cream or lotion to burns.

Fast forward quite a few years, my latest first aid course reckoned that the burn creams are a good idea. I assume that cold water is still the preferred option but has the consensus changed to burn cream/lotion is better than nothing when the water has run out?
 
Last edited:
#19
... some seriously nasty effects of hydrofluoric acid essentially dissolving bones from the inside. Truly the weapon of an utter ****.
I once found myself responsible for the safety issues of using a large quantity of hydrofluoric acid at a resuscitated mine where it was to be used in the final process of the product (diamonds), and not knowing anything about it, did some research.

Thankfully, I managed to convince the CEO that we could use hydrochloric as an alternative; HF is probably the nastiest substance a human could come into contact with in an industrial environment. Unlike most common chemistry-lab acids, its effects are very persistent, and after you've been exposed to it, it don't wash off, sadly; once it gets through the skin (which it does, easily) it continues to wash around, reacting with and killing everything in its way. The pain from the effects last a lifetime, which may be minutes. The new GM at that mine (a Denver School of Mines PhD) had proposed using the stuff in open reactor containers with a gas extractor hood over them, attended by unprotected diamond sorters. Sometimes I worry.
Safety drills for HCl were vast, fast and deep water, then a quick trip to hospital, which should have worked.
 

Similar threads

Top