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How to buy a new car?

#1
Hi Guys, as always I am turning to ARRSE as usually there is somebody on here who will give excellent advice from first-hand knowledge (and twenty more who don't allow total ignorance to stand in their way of expressing an opinion, but can be very amusing!)

Anyway, I am thinking, for the first time, of buying a new car. Nothing exciting, my sole must-haves are three three-point seatbelts in the rear, an auto gearbox, and (preferably) 4 doors minimum. I am also thinking of diesel.

How is the best way to go about getting the best price (budget is a big concern) and best finance deal? I do have the option of bank loan, or throwing the lot onto the mortgage, but I am not adverse to a dealer finance with a deposit, 3 years monthly and a lump sum at the end.

Warranty and servicing deals are also important, which is why I am thinking more main dealer than car supermarket.

I'll probably be keeping the car for a long time (6+ years)

Any advice and tips?
 
#3
I would start by saying, "DONT BUY A NEW CAR" the depreciation is rediculous, have a look at motorpoint and nearly news for a start, there, Ive saved you 50% already.
 
#5
My current car cost less than 8K and was less than a year old when I bought it, it had 6k on the clock as an ex rental, full service history etc. Full book price for same make and model from dealer six months earlier was over 26K
 
#6
You can pick up airport chauffeur service Mercedes and Volvos at auction for ridiculously low prices according to the guy that picks me up for my flights. Look for cars a year or so old with FSH in immac condition, but slightly high mileage - 40,000 miles is nothing to a Merc Diesel. The cars are usually black or silver in colour with the full monty fittings inside. I cant remember where the Heathrow cars go for auction though, sorry.
 
#7
Bollock-chops said:
I would start by saying, "DONT BUY A NEW CAR" the depreciation is rediculous, have a look at motorpoint and nearly news for a start, there, Ive saved you 50% already.
Does this apply to Lotus? Looking at the Elise and I can't see it.
 
#8
Cash may be available via loan/finance/mortgage but why pay for a new car and take on a larger debt than you need? As already said above, as soon as you roll off the forecourt in a new car you lose at least 25% of its purchase price and within a year it's closer to 50%.

www.autotrader.co.uk is always an excellent start - look around the site, find the car/age you want then look for best prices.
 
#9
If you insist on using a dealer for a "new" car, at least look for an ex-demonstrator as they usually come with a full warranty as if new, all the options and a significantly discounted price.
Better yet, as stated above get a one year old car.

Some brands have longer manufacturer waranty than others (anything up to 5 years) so do a bit of research and consider those brands as your best bet but they may not match the type of car you are looking for.

Also look for Interest free or low interest deals that some brands offer from time to time (usually only on new cars but you might get the same deal on an ex-demo). Know ahead of time what the rates are for a loan from your other sources.

Ignore any "aftermarket waranty" that a non-franchised dealer might offer you with an older car - they are generally worthless pieces of paper.

Almost anything you can buy will have three point belts in the rear but autos are generally uncommon on anything other than high-end brands and unsatisfactory on smaller engined cars so you will mainly be looking at the Merc/BMW/Volvo/Saab/Jag end of the market.
 
#10
Thanks for that, guys, and taking the time to reply. Let me know if you are looking for an Elise, StickyEnd, I have some contacts with Lotus, but they don't do an automatic and can't fit kids in the back, so no good to me!

It needs to be smaller than Volvo or SAAB (both of which I've had in older, and do go on for ever!), and nobody around South Wales seems to have ex-demo automatics, so I'll probably have no choice but go the new route. Also, I want a good warranty, and as said, I've yet to have an after-market warranty from any dealer that covered anything except the cam-shaft snapping on a Thursday in June between 15.00 and 15.30.

Three-year warranty seems to be average, as far as I can see.

Anyway, we think we have found what we like (and a plan B), any tips on negotiating a better price / higher spec / cut-price servicing? I've given my details to the two main dealers I'm interested in, and am waiting for them to get back to me.
 
#11
If you have decided on the car, don’t be afraid to walk away if the deal is not as good as you want. Remember the sales man will know how much and what he can give away on the car and if he is good at his job will have an answer for any objections you will put his way, sit down and let the sales man go through the whole sales process if he spends the time with you he will want return on his effort.
The old one like going in near the end of the month (they might be near the next band on their pay structure) is always worth a try, or see if they have any pre reg or ex demo cars that they may discount more than a new car.
 

TheIronDuke

ADC
Book Reviewer
#12
Buy a big Beemer / Audi / Jag with 80k+ on the clock for £7k.

Spend the rest on drink / drugs / escorts / yots / explosives / Galliano jackets

Change the oil every year.

Repeat.
 
#13
TheIronDuke said:
Buy a big Beemer / Audi / Jag with 80k+ on the clock for £7k.

Spend the rest on drink / drugs / escorts / yots / explosives / Galliano jackets

Change the oil every year.

Repeat.
Well, that would be my plan - has been my plan for the past 20 years of car-driving, but the Mrs wants something smaller and newer (parking space is tight). I've finally given in
 
#14
bottlesofbecks said:
If you have decided on the car, don’t be afraid to walk away if the deal is not as good as you want. Remember the sales man will know how much and what he can give away on the car and if he is good at his job will have an answer for any objections you will put his way, sit down and let the sales man go through the whole sales process if he spends the time with you he will want return on his effort.
The old one like going in near the end of the month (they might be near the next band on their pay structure) is always worth a try, or see if they have any pre reg or ex demo cars that they may discount more than a new car.
So looking on the 1st July was not so good an idea! Never mind, I don't actually need the car for a few weeks, I'll sit back and wait for the phone-calls to roll in!

My favourite so far was the Ford salesman who tried to tack on the extra for metallic paint, despite us specifically asking for the base colour (the Mrs likes red, it's the first choice), as "there are none available in red", you'll have to pay it".
 
#15
TheIronDuke said:
Buy a big Beemer / Audi / Jag with 80k+ on the clock for £7k.

Spend the rest on drink / drugs / escorts / yots / explosives / Galliano jackets

Change the oil every year.

Repeat.
:D thats what I did, 20 year old W124. cost feck all and still got at least 200,000 to do onn the clock
 
#16
flamingo said:
It needs to be smaller than Volvo or SAAB (both of which I've had in older, and do go on for ever!),
Why not a Volvo then :)...the C30, Volvo does small!

The DriveE 1.6 does 62 mpg in the books, I get around 59 in the real world, and they do an auto version.

The 2 litre diesel is slightly less economic but has better torque.

Basically a S40 with the back cut off.
 
#17
As someone else said, go to auto trader and have a look at Mercedes diesels they ship a lot of A class models with auto boxes and two year old one should see you right. You might not find it at the end of your street but travelling to pick it up is a small price to pay.
 
#18
Why buy? I'm currently looking into leasing.
It's competative, it's likely you can pick-up somethign that would normally be beyond your budget when buying and you can upgrade every three years to a brand new model without the hassle of any depreciation, etc.

Try the ARRSE favourite here - Lings Cars special offers
 
#19
If you are intent on a new car (and given that you say you'll keep it for a while the depreciation aspect becomes less of an issue) there are a few hints worth remembering.

Try one of the internet new-car sites like drivethedeal for an idea of what the guide price might be for the car you're after. There are a few around and most work on a commission basis, acting as the middle man between you and the dealer. If you do have to resort to a main dealer the the usual car salesman tricks apply: the inclusion of extras that you don't want (paint protection, upgrade to this) that is just a ploy to get you accept the higher price. resist this at all cost. Instead get the brochures and price lists and work out for yourself just what you want. Having decided upon engine, transmission etc get a test drive of one that meets the spec. Make sure it's a representative test drive (variety of roads etc). Dealer will ask what other models you're looking at and any other places you've been. Keep him guessing - he invariably needs you more thna you need him and there always another seller out there.

Having worked out the spec you need price it up. Unless you're intending to get something really in short supply then you can get a 5% disocunt without much haggling. You might be able to get up to 7.5%. Picking the right moment on the dealer's cycle (when he has to assess how many cars he's sold and whether they meet his manufacturer's targets that are imposed). End of the month-ish IIRC. For some cars, like the popular Fiat 500, discounts are almost impossible.

Once you've done all this and he's agreed a price try an squeeze a bit more out of him: boot liners, roof bars and so forth. Don't forget to ensure that the all-up prince is just that and includes road tax, tank of fuel, first registration fee and so forth. Sorry if all of this is telling you to suck eggs but.....

If you can't get the right deal then walk away, but beware the rise in VAT so if you do decide to try elsewhere check availability and delivery dates as the sales agreement will stipulate that the VAT to be paid is that at the time of sale, ie invariably when you pick up the car and cough up the money.
 

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