How to bury a General!

#1
I've just found this account of the funeral of Lieutenant General Sir G. de C. Morton at the Curragh Camp from the Irish Times Tuesday 24th April 1906.

Seems like an impressive send-off!

http://www.curragh.info/archives/LtGenMortonFuneral.pdf

It was headed by a
cavalry band playing the Dead March, followed by four squadrons of cavalry,
the 4th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment, with its band, and the 1st
Battalion East Lancashire Regiment, preceded by its band, all forming the
escort. Then came the gun carriage with the remains, drawn by four horses,
and followed by a trooper leading the saddled charger of the deceased, with
boots reversed in the stirrups.
The chief mourners occupied the next place in the ranks. They were Colonel
Morton (brother), Mr. W. G. Elliott (step-brother), Colonel Sturgess (brother-inlaw),
and Lieutenant Beaumont (nephew).
Next in the order came the representatives of the Lord Lieutenant and His
Royal Highness the Duke of Connaught, friends (in uniform) outside the
Seventh Division Command, the clergy, including the Presbyterian and
Methodist chaplains and the Dean of Kildare; officers, in reversed order of
seniority, and individual representatives of the corps and regiments other then
officers. Then followed detachments of the rank and file by units in the
following order: 3rd Dragoon Guards, 19th Hussars, Royal Horse Artillery,
Royal Field Artillery, Royal Engineers, 4th Battalion Royal Warwickshire
Regiment, 4th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, 1st Battalion East Lancashire
Regiment, 1st Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment, detachments of the
13th Brigade Battalions in order of precedence, Army Service Corps, Royal
Army Medical Corps, Ordnance, Pay, and Veterinary Corps, the whole
forming a brilliant and picturesque spectacle such has been rarely seen even
in this centre of military life.
 
#2
Thats how they did it in those days, I've got a copy of the funeral card for Lieutenant-Colonel Fraser Baddeley RA, who died in 1862, a hero of the Crimea & wounded there, Chevalier of the Legion of Honour etc., he was later, at different times, deputy of the Royal Small Arms Factory Enfield & the Royal Gunpowder Factory at Waltham Abbey.

They gave him a gun carriage funeral, even though I understand he was of insufficient rank to warrent it, followed by twelve hundred workers fron the two factories, in what was called a "spontaneous and most gratifying exhibition of feeling".
 
#3
Don't you warrent a certain "attendance" if you are of a certain rank? I had to do a garden party for a Lt(?) Colonel, who drank himself to death if the rumours were to be believed. We had to have a company outside and an honour guard (platoon) in the cemetary, as his status required.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#4
Don't you warrent a certain "attendance" if you are of a certain rank? I had to do a garden party for a Lt(?) Colonel, who drank himself to death if the rumours were to be believed. We had to have a company outside and an honour guard (platoon) in the cemetary, as his status required.
In one of his Hervey books, Mallinson (whom I would accept as an authority) suggests that when the Duke of York popped his clogs following the reductions of the army in the decade or two after Waterloo, there were insufficient troops in the UK to give him the funeral to which he was entitled.
 

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