How Systems Create Their Own Behaviour

#1
How Systems Create Their Own Behavior

Seeing that systems create their own behavior means we don’t blame the natural disaster or the individual, but the conditions of the system.

All systems are governed by circular cause-and-effect relationships called feedback loops. Sometimes, these behaviors snowball exponentially in what is called a reinforcing feedback loop. For example, wealthy people have a keen ability to invest their current wealth into future income-generating investments, which creates more and more. Sometimes, the system reacts to growth and balances it. When rising inequality reaches the public conscience, protests against the rich and policies that raise taxes are created to reverse the wealth accumulation.

The result is that systems have an abundant number of reinforcing and balancing feedback loops that together create the behaviors that we see day-to-day. If you want to change behavior, look to the underlying feedback structure.


Maybe of interest to you command and Staff Officer types?
 
#2
I see the cause and effect of violence portrayed in games, music and popular culture coupled with a politically correct lack of discipline and correction resulting in acts of extreme violence within our youth, whether this is stabbing or shooting. In short the normalization of violence and the lack of consequences creates a feedback loop.
 
#3
I was thinking of the Armed Forces repeating the same mistakes again and again...
 
#4
I see the cause and effect of violence portrayed in games, music and popular culture coupled with a politically correct lack of discipline and correction resulting in acts of extreme violence within our youth, whether this is stabbing or shooting. In short the normalization of violence and the lack of consequences creates a feedback loop.


Apart from a few nutters, everyone can distinguish between fantasy & actual violence. If fantasy violence were a significant provocation of actual violence wouldn't increasing fantasy violence correlate with an increase in actual violence? I've seen data that indicate otherwise. Take Japan for example. TV shows & movies full of Yakuza gunmen & perpetually-grimacing blokes in dressing gowns kicking the sh*t out of each other, hacking limbs off, etc. - & that's just the kids' stuff. There is the occasional gangster who does the world a favour by knocking off another gangster, or some loon who thinks he's a samurai at Sekigahara, but violent crime in Japan is low. Much the same can be said for South Korea (which consumes more video games per person than any other country) but, like Japan, it has a very low violent crime rate.

I agree that there's a lack of discipline & correction, but I think this has much more to do with apathy, ineptitude & practical limitations than PC (the PC mentality being most prevalent in pearl-clutching demands to restrict references to violence in games, music & popular culture).

I think the biggest part of the problem is the social milieu in which such people are raised. The children of violent mongs tend to grow up to be violent mongs (whereas other people's children usually don't). And unfortunately this segment of the population seems to produce a disproportionately large number of offspring. The proportion of the population these people constitute varies from nation to nation. Small in the aforementioned examples, Japan & South Korea, & I'm guessing it's much larger in your part of the world.
 
#5
Japan and Korea are examples of cultures of discipline and tradition with strong family values, You make the point regarding apathy and the lack of correct action and discipline as there is rarely just one reason or cause for a change and in this case the change in society has many elements. The sense of entitlement, political correctness (stupid people that think being overly PC makes them look smart) the absence of history and tradition, the rise and glorification of gang culture, instant gratification, violence in movies and games that are either glorified or have no consequences, the lack of parenting in the USA as many parents both work and sometimes more than one job, the emphasis on possessions and money rather than time and family and as you have pointed of genetics are certainly a factor as is your environment (we are all victims of our environment) There are multiple influences in the rise of violence and I'm sure you will dismiss some of these and add a few more.
 
#6
Take Japan for example.
Interesting thing about Japan is that their pre-primary education encourages behaviour western classrooms only see when they reach an age to study 'The Lord of the Flies.'

One documentary I watched showed a young girl telling the teacher that a classmate was chucking the books out a window. The teacher's response was, "Why are you telling me? You go sort it out."

That wasn't lazy or incompetent teaching, it was a deliberate policy to foster a sense of social responsibility before the child even reached school. While we worry about keeping class sizes down so the kids can get what we see as a fair share of the teacher's attention, they merge classes to keep them above a minimum number (about 45-50, IIRC) so that the kids get adequate socialisation.
 
#7
Apart from a few nutters, everyone can distinguish between fantasy & actual violence. If fantasy violence were a significant provocation of actual violence wouldn't increasing fantasy violence correlate with an increase in actual violence? I've seen data that indicate otherwise. Take Japan for example. TV shows & movies full of Yakuza gunmen & perpetually-grimacing blokes in dressing gowns kicking the sh*t out of each other, hacking limbs off, etc. - & that's just the kids' stuff. There is the occasional gangster who does the world a favour by knocking off another gangster, or some loon who thinks he's a samurai at Sekigahara, but violent crime in Japan is low. Much the same can be said for South Korea (which consumes more video games per person than any other country) but, like Japan, it has a very low violent crime rate.

I agree that there's a lack of discipline & correction, but I think this has much more to do with apathy, ineptitude & practical limitations than PC (the PC mentality being most prevalent in pearl-clutching demands to restrict references to violence in games, music & popular culture).

I think the biggest part of the problem is the social milieu in which such people are raised. The children of violent mongs tend to grow up to be violent mongs (whereas other people's children usually don't). And unfortunately this segment of the population seems to produce a disproportionately large number of offspring. The proportion of the population these people constitute varies from nation to nation. Small in the aforementioned examples, Japan & South Korea, & I'm guessing it's much larger in your part of the world.
Agreed.

The relationship between real violence and fantasy violence is inverse.

Violent crime is in decrease over most of the world and has been for years, despite the proliferation of fantasy violence in books, films, games, TV etc.

But picking up on the systems aspect, does not a lot of this come from having specific sets of procedures and rules which are adhered to faithfully and become box ticking exercises which restrict freedom of operation.

In many respects following procedure is more important than achieving a desired outcome.

I worked for a company that put the timely delivery of correctly completed reports ahead of their content. The best example I can give is getting earache from the M.D. because a single cell in the profit spreadsheet was £24 greater than the previous month’s forecast. (The spreadsheet accounted for roughly £4million/month across 20 services).

I was going to tell him to GFH and walk out but my ops manager gave me the eyeball to say leave it. The M.D. was an ex-officer.
 
#8
I was thinking of the Armed Forces repeating the same mistakes again and again...
As does every large organisation.
And quite often, individual persons.
History predicts the future, a wise man once said.
However, fortunately, there are those of us with a very strong logic gene.
Thank (insert sky pixie of choice here) for that, hey?
 
#9
Going back to the original post, I'm reminded of a Stafford Beer quote from more than three decades ago:

"The purpose of a system is what it does".

Which was followed in the text by the quite reasonable observation that "There is after all, no point in claiming that the purpose of a system is to do what it constantly fails to do."

Stafford Beer - Wikipedia
 

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