How quickly things change

Dunno about that, I was on a sojourn to NY in 2004 with a few mates during the Thanksgiving season. Anyhoo, in our hotel were a massive bunch of cheerleaders with chaperones. After lights out, the chaperones made their way to the nearest bar (2 doors down from the hotel), we got chatting to them and it turned out that they were from Georgia, proper Southern drawl. I spent the next 2 days with one of them, that accent when talking filth was stunning!
Personal opinions and all...I never really paid attention to accents and couldn't really tell much before, apart from Canadian and the "standard" BBC British...and confusing Aussies/ saffers/Kiwis for one another...but living in London for this long and with people of all origins has made me quite decent at picking and guessing which country they are from..
 
Dunno about that, I was on a sojourn to NY in 2004 with a few mates during the Thanksgiving season. Anyhoo, in our hotel were a massive bunch of cheerleaders with chaperones. After lights out, the chaperones made their way to the nearest bar (2 doors down from the hotel), we got chatting to them and it turned out that they were from Georgia, proper Southern drawl. I spent the next 2 days with one of them, that accent when talking filth was stunning!
Was she Daisy Duke? ;)
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
Dunno about that, I was on a sojourn to NY in 2004 with a few mates during the Thanksgiving season. Anyhoo, in our hotel were a massive bunch of cheerleaders with chaperones. After lights out, the chaperones made their way to the nearest bar (2 doors down from the hotel), we got chatting to them and it turned out that they were from Georgia, proper Southern drawl. I spent the next 2 days with one of them, that accent when talking filth was stunning!
And some people wonder why I settled in the US :)

Accent-wise, I'm nowhere. I grew up a woollyback Scouser, and to be honest, it grates on my ears when I hear it now. Same as Brummies, Cockneys, Mancs and Welsh :)

The Army ironed out a lot of it. I use words like "mucker" and "tab" (cigarette) that have no place in my upbringing. I still have the short "a" in "bath" like "sand", but other than that, you'd be hard pressed to figure out where I was from. I did technical training when I left the mob, all over the world, so I learned to speak quite deliberately and with as little accent as possible to let the various Johnny Foreigners have the best opportunity to understand the "white man's gospel of telecommunications".

Having been in the US 14 years, I still have the UK accent, but use some American words, even if spoken in an English accent. Working for a US company, I'm the "secret weapon" on our team. We might have fcuked something up spectacularly, but if I explain how it happened, it's all OK :)
 
And some people wonder why I settled in the US :)

Accent-wise, I'm nowhere. I grew up a woollyback Scouser, and to be honest, it grates on my ears when I hear it now. Same as Brummies, Cockneys, Mancs and Welsh :)

The Army ironed out a lot of it. I use words like "mucker" and "tab" (cigarette) that have no place in my upbringing. I still have the short "a" in "bath" like "sand", but other than that, you'd be hard pressed to figure out where I was from. I did technical training when I left the mob, all over the world, so I learned to speak quite deliberately and with as little accent as possible to let the various Johnny Foreigners have the best opportunity to understand the "white man's gospel of telecommunications".

Having been in the US 14 years, I still have the UK accent, but use some American words, even if spoken in an English accent. Working for a US company, I'm the "secret weapon" on our team. We might have fcuked something up spectacularly, but if I explain how it happened, it's all OK :)
Somehow if you don't have a strong Brummie or Northern accent, Brits can pull off some BS and come across as intelligent to Americans with their accent...seen it many times at work..
 
And some people wonder why I settled in the US :)

Accent-wise, I'm nowhere. I grew up a woollyback Scouser, and to be honest, it grates on my ears when I hear it now. Same as Brummies, Cockneys, Mancs and Welsh :)

The Army ironed out a lot of it. I use words like "mucker" and "tab" (cigarette) that have no place in my upbringing. I still have the short "a" in "bath" like "sand", but other than that, you'd be hard pressed to figure out where I was from. I did technical training when I left the mob, all over the world, so I learned to speak quite deliberately and with as little accent as possible to let the various Johnny Foreigners have the best opportunity to understand the "white man's gospel of telecommunications".

Having been in the US 14 years, I still have the UK accent, but use some American words, even if spoken in an English accent. Working for a US company, I'm the "secret weapon" on our team. We might have fcuked something up spectacularly, but if I explain how it happened, it's all OK :)
I stumbled into a conversation last week with a couple of reps from a beer company setting up a display in the local supermarket. I said to them, “set up the display next to the nap pies”. Confused look on their faces so I launched into the marketing ploy of putting nappies and beer close together*. They nodded away enthusiastically for a few minutes and I noticed a sort of furtive exchange of puzzled looks between them. “What don’t you understand”, I asked? “Yeah, what’s a nappies”?

Hmmmm!?
 
coming from that neck of the woods, I can tell the difference between someone from Dudley, Tipton, Coseley, Sedgley, Gornal, the Lye, etc....

funny thing is though, he sounds like he's from Kidderminster to me... or at least somewhere rural to the south of the Black Country - sort of Kinver or Wolverley.
I was born and raised in Kidderminster and although I had a West Midlands twang it was never as pronounced as this one. I've tried googling Tom Langley the performer on this record but it seems he wasn't famous enough to register.

These days my accent is a bastardised mix of everywhere I've lived over the last 50 years but when I'm angry my Brummie twang breaks through.
 
Used to know a few guys from Kidderminster, or “Kiddieminster” as they described it.
Never yet met someone who would admit to hailing from Brierley Hill. Shame really, I worked there for a bit and liked the people there.
Spot on we always treated the word as if the "r" was silent

Whilst I was a youngster my father travelled to Brierley Hill daily for work as a welder
 
Are we better or worse off now?
I'd suggets that your golden days were for most people their 30's. You were as fit as you were ever going to be, getting as much sex as you were ever going to get, old enough not to be treated like a kid, but no so old that you are 'past it' in the eyes of the young. You were either kid free or they were very young [the easy bit] and your parents generation were still young enough to look after themselves.

You translate this personal picture into a view of society in general because in the end we're all egocentric, if things are good for us it's the good times. I'd suggest that the idea we can quantify and comprehend the big statistical picture and feel that millions fewer dying of disease/war/famine in the rest of world is important to us is generally unsubstantiated.
 
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children grew up, married and moved only yards from their parents home.
I'd suggest that this is the key point and that when and how it ended, or still carries on, is variable from place to place. In Grimsby, my home town, losing the cod wars destroyed the fishing community, which had operated in this way, so it happpened to them in the late 70's. Some of these communities weren't really that old either, having been created only during the industrial revolution of the 1850's, but in folk memory anything older than your grandfather is 'forever'.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Personal opinions and all...I never really paid attention to accents and couldn't really tell much before, apart from Canadian and the "standard" BBC British...and confusing Aussies/ saffers/Kiwis for one another...but living in London for this long and with people of all origins has made me quite decent at picking and guessing which country they are from..
Manager of a project I supported. His facial features always reminded me of a stereotype and there was a twang in his accent that I couldn't place.

One day it clicked. First into the meeting (less him, who'd been in the previous meeting), five minutes before parade, we greeted. He had Boer blood. South Africa? Without getting from his seat, he bristled and stood tall.

Rhodesia. From his age, he was probably displaced by Mugabe 50 years ago. He forgave me.
 
I'd suggest that this is the key point and that when and how it ended, or still carries on, is variable from place to place. In Grimsby, my home town, losing the cod wars destroyed the fishing community, which had operated in this way, so it happpened to them in the late 70's. Some of these communities weren't really that old either, having been created only during the industrial revolution of the 1850's, but in folk memory anything older than your grandfather is 'forever'.

It still exists, 3 of our 6 children s now live within walking distance of the family home, the other three are spread out , in Bristol, Telford and Portsmouth.
 
I love dialects and accents. Mines a weird mix of woollyback, Lancashire and Cheshire put in a blender with some Devonian thrown in for extra hilarity. With extra sarcastic bastard added.
It gets my dander up, it truly does that there's oodles of money for the Celtic Mafia and their dead languages and NOTHING for the English dialects.

My grandmother, when in the right mood, she was a bad-tempered because of arthritis of the hips most of the time, would teach us dialect. When she and my Great-Aunt were together, their yakking was another language, more akin to a cross between Dutch and Danish.

I encouraged the kids I taught to learn and cherish their local words, no matter where I was, Lancs, Meseyside, York's. Once you lose your words, you've lost not only your identity but your ancestors too!

PLEASE don't ever correct a kid for using dialect.

Fcek RP!
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
It gets my dander up, it truly does that there's oodles of money for the Celtic Mafia and their dead languages and NOTHING for the English dialects.

My grandmother, when in the right mood, she was a bad-tempered because of arthritis of the hips most of the time, would teach us dialect. When she and my Great-Aunt were together, their yakking was another language, more akin to a cross between Dutch and Danish.

I encouraged the kids I taught to learn and cherish their local words, no matter where I was, Lancs, Meseyside, York's. Once you lose your words, you've lost not only your identity but your ancestors too!

PLEASE don't ever correct a kid for using dialect.

Fcek RP!
 

corby

Old-Salt
Up here in the black country, my east end london twang caused a few heads to turn when we moved up in 1988, now not so much. The black country dialect and accents are wondrous to behold, words and phrases that have not changed in 400 years, the deeper you go into the BC, the more it changes, and in Gornal, its almost impossible to understand, and I love it, and having worked all over the BC every day was a revelation, in cradley heath, in an old antiquated metal bashing shop, mostly staffed by women Up here called "Wench's" as soon as I open me Norf an Sarf, they were on me, telling me what to see, where to go, and what to eat, I didn't have the heart to tell them I now live just a few miles away, they were so proud of their history and area.

The dialect and accents of middle England change every 5 miles or so, as this part of the UK, is like london was in medieval days, a collection of Villages. Up here it, to some extent still is. each small area defined by its boundary's has its own peculiar atmosphere, trades and family run workshops, its own independent styles accents, and all come under the financial control of either Sandwell Dudley or Wolverhampton, but all retain their own unique independence. Unlike london which has morphed from a collection of small villages, into a humongous conglomerate melting pot of sounds and voices. If you want to hear the authentic language dialects, and accents, of merrie England, which has not changed for 4 century's head into the Black country.
I was a spoty 18yr old brought up in east side of B'ham, my first proper job was in West Bromwich, just a few miles from each other. The difference in dialect had me bewildered. I have to say the Black Country folk are fantastic and took me under their wing. Really funny, nice people.
 
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I was born and raised in Kidderminster
ditto - although I'm 38 so probably a generation behind you. I can spot a Kiddy accent at 10 paces. You're right that it's not a full-on one, which is why I amended it to Kinver/Wolverley, but it's there in some of the words. You'll know that the Kidderminster accent is a horrible car crash of West Country meets Black Country with a dash of Welsh on top, but there's something in the way he pronounces some of the words that makes me think he's got a passing acquaintance with that end of the A456.

I was actually born in Bromsgrove, but lived on the edge of Comberton from coming home from the hospital to 18.
 
It gets my dander up, it truly does that there's oodles of money for the Celtic Mafia and their dead languages and NOTHING for the English dialects.

My grandmother, when in the right mood, she was a bad-tempered because of arthritis of the hips most of the time, would teach us dialect. When she and my Great-Aunt were together, their yakking was another language, more akin to a cross between Dutch and Danish.

I encouraged the kids I taught to learn and cherish their local words, no matter where I was, Lancs, Meseyside, York's. Once you lose your words, you've lost not only your identity but your ancestors too!

PLEASE don't ever correct a kid for using dialect.

Fcek RP!
Well said. If we let it all die out, like Cornish did, then we lose all the regional and national identity that bloody matters.

Unfortunately, it's not a priority compared to keeping the Gaels happy.
 
Manager of a project I supported. His facial features always reminded me of a stereotype and there was a twang in his accent that I couldn't place.

One day it clicked. First into the meeting (less him, who'd been in the previous meeting), five minutes before parade, we greeted. He had Boer blood. South Africa? Without getting from his seat, he bristled and stood tall.

Rhodesia. From his age, he was probably displaced by Mugabe 50 years ago. He forgave me.
Easiest combos for most people to confuse: Austrian/ German, American/ Canadian, Australian/ New Zealand..
 
ditto - although I'm 38 so probably a generation behind you. I can spot a Kiddy accent at 10 paces. You're right that it's not a full-on one, which is why I amended it to Kinver/Wolverley, but it's there in some of the words. You'll know that the Kidderminster accent is a horrible car crash of West Country meets Black Country with a dash of Welsh on top, but there's something in the way he pronounces some of the words that makes me think he's got a passing acquaintance with that end of the A456.

I was actually born in Bromsgrove, but lived on the edge of Comberton from coming home from the hospital to 18.
My parents were allocated a council house on Comberton Estate just after they had finished building it, prior that we lived in Bromsgrove Street in a house with no inside toilet or bathroom.

After wasting my secondary education at King Charles Grammar School I joined the army and only ever went back on leave. Both my siblings live well away so I haven't been back for years and now reside in the NE.
 

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