How many of you have been to London

Did they let you keep the dustpan AND the brush?
Cuzzy at LCY sounds like a pretty sweet posting.
Big juicy cash jobs?
Had a few, probably few there now coz Blair did for us. I got my first commercial drugs job there back in 94 and my last one there in 2011. The team got a couple of big ones there, I got one at the Jet centre off a Russian :mrgreen:, point is you need to look, assume makes an ass out of u and me. No one is really respectable, did two stints there 95 for six months and from 2008-11. Seek and ye shall find unless the bosses say no.
 
I've only flown from it once, but the return leg from Belgium was an experience...

Hangover from hell, as Southend appeared on the horizon I reckon the captain let the hostie have a go at flying whilst sat on his lap.

Visions of Pegasus Bridge were foremost until he took over and war time references advanced to Vietnam and a Khe Sanh style landing.

Only saving grace was I claimed the cost back.

Hostie don't soar.
That was always a limitation. I used to fly up to Edinburgh when mum was alive and the approach was a bit hairy but you got used to it. Nearest I think was when a nose wheel collapsed, but those HS 146 et Al, are very nippy little things with impressive capabilities. Problem was the Bridges over the dock.
 
I've only flown from it once, but the return leg from Belgium was an experience...

Hangover from hell, as Southend appeared on the horizon I reckon the captain let the hostie have a go at flying whilst sat on his lap.

Visions of Pegasus Bridge were foremost until he took over and war time references advanced to Vietnam and a Khe Sanh style landing.

Only saving grace was I claimed the cost back.

Hostie don't soar.
As good as Kai Tak used to be?

 
Sometime in the eighties, the wife and I climbed up to the Chequer Board Hill, known landmark on Kowloon side which was (I understand) a marker for pilots to do the sharp right on the descent into Kai Tak.

Now a recreation area, the pink and white chequerboard painted on the rock has been preserved, However in those days you had to slip through a gap in the chain link fence to stand on the ledge below the sign. We were expecting to get evicted at anytime.

It was quite strange to see the large jets heading straight towards you. Unfortunately, I only had a fixed-lens 200mm so what should have been good shots of the aircraft passing the rock, turned out to be shots of a few windows of the aircraft as they were too close for me to zoom out of. However I did get a few good snaps from the rear of the a/c touching down.
Legend was that there were aircraft tyre marks on some of the high rise flats on the approach flight path. I think an Air India jumbo jet ended up in the drink in the seventies or eighties.
I do seem to recall a US aircraft carrying military personnel bound for Vietnam crashing with many killed- I'd always pictured it as an overshoot, but I've looked it up and it turns out it was on take off;

US aircraft crash Kai Tak
 

RangdoOfArg

LE
Book Reviewer
I used to occasionally go to the City for meetings. I used to leave early and walk back to Waterloo station, a good walk along Fleet Street, and a swift pint in Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese.
As a provincial, I am obliged to hate the Great Wen, but it is a fascinating place, especially to walk around. I would hate to live there; the Tube in particular is hell on earth.
Those of us that don’t have to live there should be grateful it exists as a magnet for luvvie/media ******* and in return pumps a bit back the shires.
 
I used to occasionally go to the City for meetings. I used to leave early and walk back to Waterloo station, a good walk along Fleet Street, and a swift pint in Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese.
As a provincial, I am obliged to hate the Great Wen, but it is a fascinating place, especially to walk around. I would hate to live there; the Tube in particular is hell on earth.
Those of us that don’t have to live there should be grateful it exists as a magnet for luvvie/media ******* and in return pumps a bit back the shires.
Slightly-odd pubs are brilliant and national treasures. They are all over the place - but a bigger choice in London :)
CAMRA/London Drinker magazine is especially good for walks around the quirky places. And you get ?£20 beer vouchers when you join!
 
I used to occasionally go to the City for meetings. I used to leave early and walk back to Waterloo station, a good walk along Fleet Street, and a swift pint in Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese.
As a provincial, I am obliged to hate the Great Wen, but it is a fascinating place, especially to walk around. I would hate to live there; the Tube in particular is hell on earth.
Those of us that don’t have to live there should be grateful it exists as a magnet for luvvie/media ******* and in return pumps a bit back the shires.
Those are very old haunts of mine, along the the Wig and Pen.
 

RangdoOfArg

LE
Book Reviewer
Slightly-odd pubs are brilliant and national treasures. They are all over the place - but a bigger choice in London :)
CAMRA/London Drinker magazine is especially good for walks around the quirky places. And you get ?£20 beer vouchers when you join!
My mukker Clive is a former train-driver (and indeed used to work for the BBC, he helped push the cameras around for the first series of Dr Who) and always brings back the London Drinker.
I left CAMRA some years ago; I found their attitudes to new trends annoying.
And those who find London prices for beer challenging: try Berkshire, Surrey or Hampshire.
 
My mukker Clive is a former train-driver (and indeed used to work for the BBC, he helped push the cameras around for the first series of Dr Who) and always brings back the London Drinker.
I left CAMRA some years ago; I found their attitudes to new trends annoying.
And those who find London prices for beer challenging: try Berkshire, Surrey or Hampshire.
I think they've backed off a bit from modern = baaaaad.
Membership has felt a bit pointless without Bill Tidy cartoons and beer festivals
 
Berkshire, Surrey or Hampshire.
Known by Londoners as the commuter belt, frequented by city high flyers, stock brokers bankers, Retired majors, assorted Senior civil servants( Whitehall warriors) and assorted self entitled obnoxious pricks, with house prices to match their pretentious aspirations...allegedly!
 
I know seems an odd question however wife in hospital and the bloke opposite likes to talk, seems he is ex Sheffield Copper in his early 70s and has been to London once, on a job at White Hart Lane. That just does not seem right, we’re not talking Dickens Time, is this normal? He said he was a country lad, but seems weird. However that Calium tractor drive on the Clarkson farming program at the grand age of 22 or what ever has been twice.

Is it lack of adventure or comfort zone, no idea, loved London as a lad, and have great memories of it for the years I lived there.

Yes I know it’s got issues, but surely they can’t put people off visiting.
I grew up in London.

No great fan of the place, I left age 19, when I joined the Army. Drifted back between times (old mates from skule, mostly)

Then spent 2 years in Berlin, and realised what a tawdry, expensive, closes early, cheapskate city London was.

Went back end of May (wife's birthday)

Caught COVID in time for the jubilee

Not impressed
 
Known by Londoners as the commuter belt, frequented by city high flyers, stock brokers bankers, Retired majors, assorted Senior civil servants( Whitehall warriors) and assorted self entitled obnoxious pricks, with house prices to match their pretentious aspirations...allegedly!
Oh yes indeed. I worked at a place where this little short-arsed tiny-faced, chinless quarter-wit insisted on being called 'major'.
He was from Hampshire, no-one did call him that and my mate confirmed he was very much in the 'short-arms' club , rather than the 'rifles'. Very light trigger, too.
Spitting image of William Hague.
 
I grew up in London.

No great fan of the place, I left age 19, when I joined the Army. Drifted back between times (old mates from skule, mostly)

Then spent 2 years in Berlin, and realised what a tawdry, expensive, closes early, cheapskate city London was.

Went back end of May (wife's birthday)

Caught COVID in time for the jubilee

Not impressed
it is cheapskate and 'early doors (closing in your face)', can't recall anywhere in the UK being much better.
I did like Sheffield & Glasgow., Not so much, Leeds & Edinburgh, strangely.
 
As good as Kai Tak used to be?


I flew into Kai Tak in the early 90s, en route to Sapporo. The in flight entertainment was in those days was projected onto a screen on the bulkhead, and as landing neared a live feed from a nose wheel camera was shown. Thus, on waking at the end of a ten (?) hour flight I was presented with what looked like a ringside seat at "Aircrash Investigation ". The duty free got a right hammering.
 

RangdoOfArg

LE
Book Reviewer
Known by Londoners as the commuter belt, frequented by city high flyers, stock brokers bankers, Retired majors, assorted Senior civil servants( Whitehall warriors) and assorted self entitled obnoxious pricks, with house prices to match their pretentious aspirations...allegedly!
Oi! I resemble that remark, as I live in Hampshire.
And now, one can work from home most of the time to annoy Rees-Mogg, with just the odd jaunt to town to pinch Wendy’s bum at the photocopier.
I jested to an acquaintance once about London over other towns “better restaurants, better whores, better drugs” and he said that was about right.
People will always be attracted to London.
Yrs, obnoxious prick.
 
As good as Kai Tak used to be?


Happy memories! The first time I took off from Kai Tak (pax not pilot) at the age of around 14 I remember a very loud bang at the moment that BA003 (?) departed terra firma. Happily I had a window seat and was able to enjoy a ringside view of No 3 engine spewing flame and not functioning quite as expected.

With another three engines available, this is apparently Not A Big Deal and we landed safely again a while later, albeit surrounded by many fire engines.

I didn't even get to throw myself down an evacuation slide which in retrospect was a little disappointing.
 
Sometime in the eighties, the wife and I climbed up to the Chequer Board Hill, known landmark on Kowloon side which was (I understand) a marker for pilots to do the sharp right on the descent into Kai Tak.

Now a recreation area, the pink and white chequerboard painted on the rock has been preserved, However in those days you had to slip through a gap in the chain link fence to stand on the ledge below the sign. We were expecting to get evicted at anytime.

It was quite strange to see the large jets heading straight towards you. Unfortunately, I only had a fixed-lens 200mm so what should have been good shots of the aircraft passing the rock, turned out to be shots of a few windows of the aircraft as they were too close for me to zoom out of. However I did get a few good snaps from the rear of the a/c touching down.

I do seem to recall a US aircraft carrying military personnel bound for Vietnam crashing with many killed- I'd always pictured it as an overshoot, but I've looked it up and it turns out it was on take off;

US aircraft crash Kai Tak
I used to scamble up the side of Lions Rock which seperated Kowloon from the NT. Looking down on Osborne Bks in Kowloon Tong as the Jumbo's came towards you on the approach to Kai Tak. Coming back from Fiji looking down on the barracks as the aircraft turned towards KT.

London is OK, but Hong Kong from 1984-86 working for Lizzie sure beat it.
 
Talking of never having been to London - After retiring to East Anglia, I used to travel down for the day by coach, maybe once a week or fortnight, tying up loose ends. With no worries about Peak/Off Peak fares, I could get an earlier start so it was more convenient and cheaper than the train. Especially as I could avoid the last 50 minutes of crawling traffic by getting off at Stratford and using the Central Line or Jubilee Line to get to where I or the wife wanted to go.

Anyway, it always seemed that there would be some passengers going to the Smoke for the first time- the shock when they crossed from the open spaces and tidiness of Wanstead to the 'cosmopolitan' Forest Gate, Stratford and Mile End was almost palpable.

On one return journey, just passing Victoria rail station, we had one lady (probably not a first timer, I suspect she had been taking her husband for a medical appointment) asked the other passengers 'What's that attractive building on the right'
As no one else answered, I piped up with;

"It's Westminster Cathedral, the Catholic cathedral"

One of the first-timers said to general nodding agreement, "No, that's not Westminster Cathedral", the driver pitched in by pointing to the other end of Victoria Street and saying "No it isn't, Westminster Cathedral is down that road there"

Now, it's annoying when you are contradicted on something you know as an absolute fact by someone who clearly doesn't have a clue (happens a lot on Arrse !) so I replied in my best patronising stentorian that brooked no argument;
"Nooo, (pause) Westminster ABBEY is down that road there, THAT'S Westminster CATHEDRAL"

Silence followed but karma came for our geographically-challenged dissenting driver when he missed his turn-off at Forest Gate, and, not realising he could easily recover further down, did a three point turn in Roman Road, damaging the rear of the coach and some garage forecourt furniture in the process.
I wasn't impressed.
 

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