How long until fully trained and potentially deployable?

Hello Everyone,

I'm In the process of applying for the Army Reserve - meeting the unit i want to join next week (intelligence) and have an appointment with the GP to fill out/send off the medical forms booked in.

I'm probably getting ahead of myself here, but if everything goes well and i get in, how long does it take on average before you are fully trained and potentially deployable? This is assuming i'd complete Phase 1 and Phase 2 as quickly as it can be arranged.

I realise that may be a 'how long is a piece of string' question, but the reason i am asking is because i'm thinking of down the line when i have to break the news to my boss about me being in the AR (fingers crossed). I work in a university, so it is a bit of a PC, save the world environment - so i'm anticipating my boss not taking it too well . I have two years left on my contract, so i was wondering if one of the ways i could potentially allay her fears and have an ace up my sleeve, would be to be able to say i wouldn't even be ready for mobilisation in XX months/years before i'm fully trained.

Cheers!
 

chrisg46

LE
Book Reviewer
Effectively, you mobilise when you want to. But allow a year at least to get through the system.
 
Hello Everyone,

I'm In the process of applying for the Army Reserve - meeting the unit i want to join next week (intelligence) and have an appointment with the GP to fill out/send off the medical forms booked in.

I'm probably getting ahead of myself here, but if everything goes well and i get in, how long does it take on average before you are fully trained and potentially deployable? This is assuming i'd complete Phase 1 and Phase 2 as quickly as it can be arranged.

I realise that may be a 'how long is a piece of string' question, but the reason i am asking is because i'm thinking of down the line when i have to break the news to my boss about me being in the AR (fingers crossed). I work in a university, so it is a bit of a PC, save the world environment - so i'm anticipating my boss not taking it too well . I have two years left on my contract, so i was wondering if one of the ways i could potentially allay her fears and have an ace up my sleeve, would be to be able to say i wouldn't even be ready for mobilisation in XX months/years before i'm fully trained.

Cheers!
Just my opinion but I think if I was your boss I would rather know now than later on. Most employers in the public sector or education have a policy of allowing a certain number of staff to be reservists. Check out whether yours does - Because if they do you will get special leave for a certain amount of your training and your job will be held if you deploy. If you just join up and hope for the best you'll have to use up annual leave for all your training commitments - and if you're hoping to get past phase 2 in a year you'll need to use up in excess of 4 weeks leave (i think) - without allowing for long weekends and early start evenings. Go for it, though. You wont regret it - but check your work policy out before doing anything that will feck your boss off.
 
Just my opinion but I think if I was your boss I would rather know now than later on. Most employers in the public sector or education have a policy of allowing a certain number of staff to be reservists. Check out whether yours does - Because if they do you will get special leave for a certain amount of your training and your job will be held if you deploy. If you just join up and hope for the best you'll have to use up annual leave for all your training commitments - and if you're hoping to get past phase 2 in a year you'll need to use up in excess of 4 weeks leave (i think) - without allowing for long weekends and early start evenings. Go for it, though. You wont regret it - but check your work policy out before doing anything that will feck your boss off.

Thanks for your reply, i definitely agree with you about letting my boss know sooner rather than later. That is why i want to be equipped with as many facts as possible before doing so.

Good advice, i've just checked the HR policy and i cannot see any mention about total numbers of staff in the reserves, but apparently i'd be entitled to a weeks worth of paid special leave for training and am expected to use annual leave for any other training commitments - this would give me 32 days total which may give me some leeway for aiming to complete phase 1 and 2 in a year but not a lot of wiggle room for much else... Is it right to be assume that you arn't eligible for mobilisation until phase 1 and 2 are both completed?

And cheers mate, i don't want to feck her off but i need to do this whether she likes it or not
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
Is it right to be assume that you arn't eligible for mobilisation until phase 1 and 2 are both completed?
I wouldn't worry about that, there's nothing a war zone needs more than an untrained soldier, after all someone has to peel the spuds and wash dixies!
 

STABARMR

Old-Salt
From my experience with the T.A which was way back in 1999/2000:- I was told that i wasn't eligible to mobilise until i had passed my 2 week recruit course and passed my class 3 Armourers course. I did this june/july 1999. In nov/dec 99 i approached my SPSI and completed the paperwork to 'volunteer' for mobilisation. I was told it wook take months and months before i heard anything. Even if i was needed/selected to go to RTMC Chillwell. First week in Jan 2000 the letter came thru ordering me to attend RTMC around ten days later. This was for Bosnia / Kosovo. It may be done differently 19 years later
 
Thanks for your reply, i definitely agree with you about letting my boss know sooner rather than later. That is why i want to be equipped with as many facts as possible before doing so.

Good advice, i've just checked the HR policy and i cannot see any mention about total numbers of staff in the reserves, but apparently i'd be entitled to a weeks worth of paid special leave for training and am expected to use annual leave for any other training commitments - this would give me 32 days total which may give me some leeway for aiming to complete phase 1 and 2 in a year but not a lot of wiggle room for much else... Is it right to be assume that you arn't eligible for mobilisation until phase 1 and 2 are both completed?

And cheers mate, i don't want to feck her off but i need to do this whether she likes it or not
I wouldn't worry about mobilisation. See how you get on with your training first. If you're looking to finish phase 2 then immediately hop on a herc and head off to Syria or something then maybe you should be thinking about the regulars if you're still young enough. Otherwise, don't forget that the role of reserves is to be trained up ready to deploy either in a Telic/Herrick type of situation (for which you would also do another 6 months or so pre-deployment training to make sure you don't do anything stupid) or more likely to backfill for regulars or do civil defence type jobs. Many reservists post-Afghanistan are unlikely to get the opportunity to deploy anywhere dangerous - so you could find yourself deployed in the UK on short deployments covering security matters (like with the 2012 olympics). I would finally point out that after phase 2 you don't stop training. Although you are badged in your trade, you still have to constantly renew tickets, redo drills, and develop your trade training.
 
I wouldn't worry about that, there's nothing a war zone needs more than an untrained soldier, after all someone has to peel the spuds and wash dixies!
And to burn cook stuff.
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
Just as untrained as you were, matey, at least I wasn't careless enough to leave bits behind :mrgreen:
I’m still on task, it’s a long soak.

It appears we’ve both upset hard mouse.
 
Hello Everyone,

I'm In the process of applying for the Army Reserve - meeting the unit i want to join next week (intelligence) and have an appointment with the GP to fill out/send off the medical forms booked in.

I'm probably getting ahead of myself here, but if everything goes well and i get in, how long does it take on average before you are fully trained and potentially deployable? This is assuming i'd complete Phase 1 and Phase 2 as quickly as it can be arranged.

I realise that may be a 'how long is a piece of string' question, but the reason i am asking is because i'm thinking of down the line when i have to break the news to my boss about me being in the AR (fingers crossed). I work in a university, so it is a bit of a PC, save the world environment - so i'm anticipating my boss not taking it too well . I have two years left on my contract, so i was wondering if one of the ways i could potentially allay her fears and have an ace up my sleeve, would be to be able to say i wouldn't even be ready for mobilisation in XX months/years before i'm fully trained.

Cheers!
1. Capita will take as long as they take to actually get you somewhere near the start line. I feel your pain on this but there are plenty of threads here about the dramas that can ensue.

2. You will have to pass INT Corps technical selection. if you pass (and depending on which Bn you are joining) you will then be put through the TSC process immediately - lets say 3 months from capita getting you to the post and starting your training.

3. You will have to go through the phase 2 process. I am not going to go into that but if you are committed and there are spaces you could come out as an acting LCpl OPMI in 6 months.

In short, with a huge amount of dedication, luck and forward leaning unit staff, you get through it in a year. This would technically make you deployable; however that is not going to happen until we invade Belgium or deploy a brigade in support of the Ukranians.

As an OPMI you would also have the option to not tell your employer - this is risky though and CO's don't like it.
 

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