How it sounds - losing your cockpit canopy at 30,000 ft

#1
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#2
F-15 pilots at 30,000 feet: ‘We’re landing without a canopy, do you copy?’
I knew pilots who landed without the entire aircraft.
Courtesy of Martin Baker.
More seriously that was no doubt a major WTF moment, or whatever the Hebrew equivalent is.
 
#3
I knew pilots who landed without the entire aircraft.
Courtesy of Martin Baker.
More seriously that was no doubt a major WTF moment, or whatever the Hebrew equivalent is.
The pilot remains cool as a cucumber, the navigator acts a little more unsettled
 
#4
Does anyone know what altitude the late Lt Cdr Jack London was at when he lost the canopy from his Sea Harrier in 1998, and still managed to land on the carrier? The series 999 covered the incident in a programme.
 
#5
The pilot remains cool as a cucumber, the navigator acts a little more unsettled
He quite likely had his head down in the office and no doubt the first impression was that something more serious had happened. Having done the altitude chamber plus explosive decompression, many years ago, I have a rough of idea of what it must have been like. Just add a cheeky little breeze of around 420kts plus a nice cosy OAT of around - 25 to -30 C.
Well done to both for having recovered the jet safely. I hope that the missing canopy didn't land on anyone, they weigh quite a bit.
 
#6
Does anyone know what altitude the late Lt Cdr Jack London was at when he lost the canopy from his Sea Harrier in 1998, and still managed to land on the carrier? The series 999 covered the incident in a programme.

I think it was about 40,000 feet over the Gulf. I remember the ship's instantaneous response to his laconic "Cabriolet Sea Harrier inbound" and the relief when he landed safely.

Tragic that he was later killed in a training exercise at Wittering. A really good man.
 
#7
I think it was about 40,000 feet over the Gulf. I remember the ship's instantaneous response to his laconic "Cabriolet Sea Harrier inbound" and the relief when he landed safely.

Tragic that he was later killed in a training exercise at Wittering. A really good man.
There was a large article in the Telegraph at the time. I cannot remember which one of the Invincible class it was, but there were on (or going to/returning) an operational deployment in the Gulf and Middle East.
 
#10
There was a large article in the Telegraph at the time. I cannot remember which one of the Invincible class it was, but there were on (or going to/returning) an operational deployment in the Gulf and Middle East.

It was INVINCIBLE, in 1998, on her way to the Gulf. I originally thought was that the incident occurred in the Gulf itself, but checking the Navy News report of the award to Lt Cdr London of The Queen's Commendation for Bravery in the Air it happened in the Gulf of Aden. Twenty-one years ago.......blimey.
 
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#12
The pilot remains cool as a cucumber, the navigator acts a little more unsettled
The backseater will have had significantly more turbulence than that in the front cockpit until airspeed was reduced. I don’t blame the poor bugger for crapping himself, he must have been badly beaten around the head.
 
#13
I hope that the missing canopy didn't land on anyone, they weigh quite a bit.
Stand by for amnesty international to claim it destroyed 3 Palestinian hospitals, an orphanage and the last breeding pair of Dead Sea Otter's....
 
#17
What a fantastic experience to have coped with and lived through. BIG memories from small amounts of time. I've had some moments and although intense at the time in hindsight epic! I'm jealous.
 

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