How does the 2 REP (FFL) compare to the British Paras?

Is that the survival course where you live off the land, for a week, if so, I did it
We did a short version of that course as our tour in Bangui was cut short for operational deployment on Op Manta.
 
“Caporal Chef de Premier Classe” sounds like a total abortion! I wonder why they decided to make that distinction and what purpose it serves?

Paging @fantassin for a comment if possible?

As for the CT1 going I had heard that that whole system had been rejigged/replaced/renamed by the French Army.

It used to be that for professional (I.e. not conscripted) non-commissioned personnel there were three levels of military/command (CM) and technical (CT) skills that usually had to be achieved for promotion. The two combined at each level to give the holder a professional military brevet (BMP). The levels were “elementary”, “one” and “two”. So the courses were CME/CTE for BMPE and promotion to “Caporal”. CM1/CT1 for BMP1 and promotion to “Sergent” and CM2/CT2 for BMP2 and promotion to “Sergent-Chef”.

The various professional military trades were given number designations. For example “00“ was general military/infantry skills and every one in the Legion doing a "Peloton des Caporaux" (i.e. a Corporals’ Course) did a combined CME/CTE 00. Then (usually some time later if in an infantry unit) individuals could do another CTE in another trade, in my case I did a CTE 03 which was “Transmissions” (i.e. Signals) and qualified as a Radio Telegraphist.

To advance further up the promotion ladder I could aim for the BMP1 and promotion to "Sergent". For this I could go one of two ways do the CM1 and then either the CT1 00 or CT1 03. Often it happened in the Legion that as the CT1 00 automatically followed on from the CM1, even if someone was looking at specialising in a trade, they would still do the CT1 00 , then later the relevant other CT1. Then they would still have two pathways open to me for further promotion

Or, I could just do the CT1 03 and become a Caporal-Chef specialising in that trade only and progress upwars only through the Caporal-Chef grades.

Of course there were some snazzy badges that went along with each course. :)
CCH 1ere classe has been in existence for about 20 years or so as a way to distinguish the most senior CCH.
The conditions for promotion to this rank have evolved with time. Now l believe you need to have the CQTS (certificat de qualification technique supérieur) which is experience and not exam based.
The previous CT1 and CAT2 exams no longer exist for CCH.
You can be promoted to CCH 1ere classe after
12 years of service
 
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Still ref. the CCH, I saw recently that FFL CCH are currently authorized the black képi after 17 years of service.
I may be completely wrong, but I seem to remember it used to be much less and was worn by the two senior grades of Caporal Chef.
 

Glad_its_all_over

ADC
Book Reviewer
So did I until l saw a recent Twitter feed where 2 CCH received their képi noir after reaching 17 years of service...
Interesting. Certainly in the early 60s, Simon Murray's time, CCH wore the black kepi, it was a big deal.
 

Glad_its_all_over

ADC
Book Reviewer
I don't think it was all of them.
I may be misremembering, but I certainly recall that in his book, after completing his Corporals' Course and coming top - and being promoted CCH as a result - there was a big deal about his getting to wear a kepi noir.
 
I may be misremembering, but I certainly recall that in his book, after completing his Corporals' Course and coming top - and being promoted CCH as a result - there was a big deal about his getting to wear a kepi noir.
But was that just a special deal for coming top of the "Peloton" and getting a senior grade of Caporal-Chef or was that specifically explained in the book that it applied to all the Caporaux Chefs. Certainly at the time I was serving (from 1981) junior Caporaux-Chefs wore white kepis and it seemed that it an established tradition and not something that had been recently instigated
 

Glad_its_all_over

ADC
Book Reviewer
But was that just a special deal for coming top of the "Peloton" and getting a senior grade of Caporal-Chef or was that specifically explained in the book that it applied to all the Caporaux Chefs. Certainly at the time I was serving (from 1981) junior Caporaux-Chefs wore white kepis and it seemed that it an established tradition and not something that had been recently instigated
You're far more likely to be right than I am, I haven't read the book for many years and it didn't register that hard when I did.

The CCH I came across in the French EW setup all those years ago were long-term professionals, but not serving in what we would consider NCO slots - high-end techies and linguists, mainly. Some friction evident between them and the youngish Sergents and Sergents-Chef who may not have had major trade skills but had done the courses for gold stripes. The Adjutants were good news, mainly.
 

LepetitCaporal

Old-Salt
The difference is, when all said and done, was...
A Caporal chef with a C.T.1 obtained the échelle 4... that's a 3 or 4 hundred euros added to the pension (approx)
 

LepetitCaporal

Old-Salt
We did a short version of that course as our tour in Bangui was cut short for operational deployment on Op Manta.
So, you will know the restraunt de 2 mille villas?
Near / next to the airport
Bob Denard was there recruiting when I was
I was just passing thru on escort at the time...the regiment were based in Bouar, under the command of Colonel François
Another legend
 
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So, you will know the restraunt de 2 mille villas?
Near / next to the airport
Bob Denard was there recruiting when I was
I was just passing thru on escort at the time...the regiment were based in Bouar, under the command of Colonel François
Another legend
Do you mean the All Ranks Mess in the Camp de Mille Villas (The Camp of the Thousand Villas)? Where we were based? It had a very old-school colonial atmosphere.

It was called that because every "Groupe" (UK Section equivalent) was accommodated in a villa. There was a room for the Sergent, "Chef de Groupe" (Section Commander) another room for the two Caporaux "Chefs d'Equipe" (Team Leaders) and two more rooms for the rest of the men. Each villa had a local native "boy" who did all the cleaning, washing, ironing, etc. All the "corvees" (i.e. "block jobs", area cleaning, kitchen duties, etc.) were also done by the "boys". Our "Adjudant Compagnie" (Company Sergeant Major), an idiosyncratic, Italian used to have all the boys formed up for drill in the mornings before work. They did this with their various implements, rakes, brooms, mops, etc.

The All Ranks Mess in the Camp de Mille Villas was something else. A long bar for an aperitif before meals with Officers at one end, Sous-Offs in the middle and HdR at the other end. Everybody sitting down at tables (again segregated by rank) with waiter service.

We were in Bangui just over a month in Dec '83 -Jan '84. The rest of the Regiment was in Chad on Op Manta and 3eme Cie was Airborne ready reserve in Bangui and doing garrison/guard duties and field training. We celebrated Christmas and New Year there and then were deployed to Chad on Ops as the situation escalated.
 
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Phonetically deux and de are very similar. :)

Anyway my memory is not so good. Could have been Camp de 200 (Deux Cent) Villas
 
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A few more recent pics from " REP's official Instagram page:
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One for the Sky Gods !!

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5th Company doing Helicopter Drills.

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Cohesion!
(Obviously after some hard physical exercise).
 

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