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How does the 2 REP (FFL) compare to the British Paras?

Some more 2 REP airborne training:

This clip is titled the "Stage Chef de Groupe du Saut" (Airborne Section UK / US Squad, Commander's Course). Each "Sergent, Chef de Groupe" in 2 REP has to do this course.
However it appears that some purely 3rd Company amphibious training footage has been included in the clip.
 
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LepetitCaporal

Old-Salt
Gives us another chance to see those lovely Hotchkiss jeeps. Aaaahhh !

The Legion held the world record of stripping and re assembling the jeep and for a number of years...do not know when it was...70's early 80' s..as i had already heard of
If true, it was probably done in the old Castel (Quartier Lapasset)...was a motor pool across the road,...some where! ( Did corvée there as an E.V....summer 83
Probably during a mechanic's course
Would like it if I can learn some more, ta in advance
 
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LepetitCaporal

Old-Salt
I have been told that it is 7 jumps per year (actual) to maintain the prime de frime, as we call it in the Infantry, Para pay, if you prefer...
Am sure of my source
 
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I have been told that it is 7 jumps per year (actual) to maintain the prime de frime, as we call it in the Infantry, Para pay, if you prefer...
Am sure of my source

Ah, a little bit of inter-regimental rivalry and perhaps a wee bit of envy here. :)

A “prime” (pronounced “preem”) is an additional payment to your salary for certain extra duties, qualifications, hardships or hazards. The “prime de parachutiste” used to make up around 30% of a Repman’s pay; so a not insubstantial additional wedge of cash each month. I’m not sure what the current situation is, but I’d hazard a guess that it’s still about the same.

“Frime” (pronounced “freem”) means “showing-off” or a sort of strutting boastfulness.
 
Two Legionnaires from 13 DBLE on weekend leave in Montpellier and a frIend with whom they were staying were wounded with bladed weapons when they intervened to help two Spaniards being assaulted by a gang of violent youths. The knife wielders are in custody and the wounded men are recovering from their injuries which are not life threatening. The criminal youths are well known recidivists.

Edited to add: According to Legion social media, the two wounded Legionnaires are back in the 13 DBLE Garrison at the town of La Cavalerie, where they have been congratulated by their Commanding Officer for their resolute action and it was stated that they should be back to their usual duties within a few days.
 
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Jean d'Épée

Old-Salt
I think we started with about forty. Maybe a dozen or so originals on passout. A drop out rate of around two thirds, which was pretty normal in the infantry depots back in the eighties.
How quickly is a recruit discharged? In my day, he would be removed from the platoon the same day ( or the next day, at most) but the actual discharge process could take weeks. Now, AIUI, the recruit has to do twenty eight days training before he can even request a discharge.
As far as I understand it, it’s difficult to discharge quickly. When I went through there was one Mongolian after Week 1 of the farm decided he didn’t want to go through with it and managed to go back to Castel the following week (I don’t know how long it took him to get out completely, I never saw him again. Although I suspect he probably waited 1-2 weeks in Castel before going to Aubagne and then waiting again 1-2 weeks before leaving). After this there were those disillusioned during the farm but when they asked to leave they were told to wait until after the Kepi Blanc march, some decided to stay but I think around 5 continued to say that they wanted to leave. They stayed in Castel for another 2 weeks in a different floor doing odd jobs and corvee, until going to Aubagne and waiting another 2 weeks. After this there were more that were disillusioned and wanted to go but they were told to wait and then finally when the end of instruction came they asked to go civil. For these guys I think they didn’t have to wait long in Aubagne when they were with us, maybe a week most, and then they left the Legion. A lot of the guys that were disillusioned but went to regiment ended up deserting.

Again I can only quote my experience and I’m sure that my platoon/company in Castel was one of the easier ones, the cadre (I think the CDS was looking for a promotion) wanted to retain as much potential legionnaires as possible and wouldn’t go so hard on us, whereas I know in other companies and platoons they would actively try to make the recruits desert or ask for civil.
 

Jean d'Épée

Old-Salt
On the 2 REP official Facebook page is a short statement by a "Caporal Artur" about an engagement he was involved in, in the recent deployment on Op Barkhane (my translation with the help of Google Translate):
Apparently this is not correct, the guy said he told the media maybe 2 sentences and they strung it out.
 

Jean d'Épée

Old-Salt
A series of recent short interviews, in French and with French subtitles, of different Légionnaires originating from Brazil, Georgia, France and Nepal and belonging to the 13°DBLE giving insight into their reasons for joining and life in the Légion.

The best part is when they are asked "what is the first French word you learnt"; the answers are, according to the interviews :

Caporal-chef (the top enlisted, non NCO rank)
Fatigué (tired)
Balai and serpillère (broom and mop)
Bouffe (scran)

:)

The one that replied bouffe is lying ;)
 
Question about those phone boxes on the left, were they there/active during your time? They’ve been empty since I came and they give off an eerie forlorn vibe now
Yes, it was the only way for the “cas sociaux” (“social cases” i.e. the Légionnaires who had someone on the outside they cared about) to phone out.
 
Weren’t you in at the time of the Mont Garbi incident in 1982?
Yes, that wasn’t a parachuting accident, it was a plane crashing into a mountain.
 
Apparently this is not correct, the guy said he told the media maybe 2 sentences and they strung it out.
It’s more likely to have been the Regimental public relations officer. :)
 

Jean d'Épée

Old-Salt
Newcomers to 2 REP's 1st Company get an initial taste of the Company's specialisation "combat en zone urbaine" or FIBUA as it is called in UK military parlance. Note the green DZ patches on the sleeve and green triangles on the back oft he helmets indicative of 1st Company "Les Verts".
This is the stage compagnie for this year and it’s a Ukrainian sergeant directing at the beginning. Honestly I think they were lucky, usually most of the stages compagnie are conducted during winter in the cold/snow to reinforce the ramassage and pain/punishment. The green DZ patch also signifies compagnie traumatisée ;)
 

Jean d'Épée

Old-Salt
Hell, no!

But they’ve all been through it though. To volunteer for the GCP pre-selection tests, you have to be at least a “Caporal”, so would have been in the Legion for about two years minimum and got a short overseas tour or two in already.

In any case, the major bullshit tends to be over once you’ve been a year in the Regiment.
I would say more like 2 years and definitely depending on the company/platoon, but the GCP don’t go through so much BS as the rest. In saying that, they are still a part of CA, so there’s occasionally service and the younger corporals will have to do a lot more work than the plus anciens
 
As far as I understand it, it’s difficult to discharge quickly. When I went through there was one Mongolian after Week 1 of the farm decided he didn’t want to go through with it and managed to go back to Castel the following week (I don’t know how long it took him to get out completely, I never saw him again. Although I suspect he probably waited 1-2 weeks in Castel before going to Aubagne and then waiting again 1-2 weeks before leaving). After this there were those disillusioned during the farm but when they asked to leave they were told to wait until after the Kepi Blanc march, some decided to stay but I think around 5 continued to say that they wanted to leave. They stayed in Castel for another 2 weeks in a different floor doing odd jobs and corvee, until going to Aubagne and waiting another 2 weeks. After this there were more that were disillusioned and wanted to go but they were told to wait and then finally when the end of instruction came they asked to go civil. For these guys I think they didn’t have to wait long in Aubagne when they were with us, maybe a week most, and then they left the Legion. A lot of the guys that were disillusioned but went to regiment ended up deserting.

Again I can only quote my experience and I’m sure that my platoon/company in Castel was one of the easier ones, the cadre (I think the CDS was looking for a promotion) wanted to retain as much potential legionnaires as possible and wouldn’t go so hard on us, whereas I know in other companies and platoons they would actively try to make the recruits desert or ask for civil.
That makes it a lot easier than in my time (early to mid-eighties). Unless there was a very valid reason, like something that invalidated the individual’s recruitment in the first place, the only realistic ways out were desertion or medical discharge.

Although it was theoretically possible to revoke one’s contract in the first six months, so many obstacles were put up, that practically it was extremely difficult, especially as life was made very difficult for an individual who initiated the process.
 

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