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How does the 2 REP (FFL) compare to the British Paras?

So long as they don't move on to 'SS Machiert in Feindesland', or if they do, stick to the FFL version sung in French.
Plenty of other German language songs in the Legion. Many dating back to the 1800’s.

Before anyone starts off again with the fallacy that the Legion was full of former SS after WW2.

p.s. “Devil’s Guard” is sensationalist fiction written by an American hack; before anyone starts quoting that.
 
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wild_moose

War Hero
Do they have to put up with all the bullshit that the other Legionnaires have to put up with in the Companies?

There’s a decent episode on the Jocko Podcast (Jocko is a former SEAL) featuring a Canadian ex-Legionnaire who served in combat with the GCP which gives some insight as to its set up

Certainly enlightened me as I wasn’t aware of it before
 
There’s a decent episode on the Jocko Podcast (Jocko is a former SEAL) featuring a Canadian ex-Legionnaire who served in combat with the GCP which gives some insight as to its set up

Certainly enlightened me as I wasn’t aware of it before
Yup. There’s a link to it earlier in the thread and the Canadian chap wrote a book as well, which was well received.
 
Plenty of other German language songs in the Legion. Many dating back to the 1800’s.

Before anyone starts off again with the fallacy that the Legion was full of former SS after WW2.

p.s. “Devil’s Guard” is sensationalist fiction written by an American hack; before anyone starts quoting that.
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James Worden joined the RAF in WW2 at the age of 17 and served as a rear gunner and flew extensively in nthe Western Desert and Europe completing 94 bombing operations.

He enlisted in the FFL at the age of 36 in 1959 serving on operations with 3 REI on operations against the FLN in the mountains of Algeria.

In 1962 he joins the 2 REP in 1963 and was invalided out after serving seven years after a parachute jump that ended in a collision with a stone farmhouse.

In the foreword to the book on page 12 he writes:

Perhaps the greatest part of my good fortune was the fact that the majority of the senior non-commissioned officers were of German origin and had served in the forces of their home;land during the Second World War (yes some had even served in the SS). The fact that I had been their enemy during hostilities did not cause any hatred or dislike.

In 1984 he became secretary-general of the Foreign Legion Association of Great Britain and in 1996 he became the associations historian.

He died age 75 in January 1999. Four legionnaires carried the coffin at his funeral.
 
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James Worden joined the RAF in WW2 at the age of 17 and served as a rear gunner and flew extensively in nthe Western Desert and Europe completing 94 bombing operations.

He enlisted in the FFL at the age of 36 in 1959 serving on operations with 3 REI on operations against the FLN in the mountains of Algeria.

In 1962 he joins the 2 REP in 1963 and was invalided out after serving seven years after a parachute jump that ended in a collision with a stone farmhouse.

In the foreword to the book on page 12 he writes:

Perhaps the greatest part of my good fortune was the fact that the majority of the senior non-commissioned officers were of German origin and had served in the forces of their home;land during the Second World War (yes some had even served in the SS). The fact that I had been their enemy during hostilities did not cause any hatred or dislike.

In 1984 he became secretary-general of the Foreign Legion Association of Great Britain and in 1996 he became the associations historian.

He died age 75 in January 1999. Four legionnaires carried the coffin at his funeral.
Actually I see from a post of yours in 2015 you knew him.

"From what I can remember: He was a working class Bermondsey bloke who joined the RAF in the ranks and was commissioned during the war. He flew B-25 Mitchells if I remember correctly.

He qualified as an accountant post-war and ended up working for one of the oil companies in Saudi. Then his missus cleaned out his bank account account and disappeared. So his life sort of reached a tipping point.

After the Algerian War he left the Legion and apparently his combined skills from both the RAF and the Legion got him some work in Africa.

I got to know him when he was retired and back on his "manor" in Bermondsey after I left the Legion. A very gruff old boy but with a heart of gold".
 
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James Worden joined the RAF in WW2 at the age of 17 and served as a rear gunner and flew extensively in nthe Western Desert and Europe completing 94 bombing operations.

He enlisted in the FFL at the age of 36 in 1959 serving on operations with 3 REI on operations against the FLN in the mountains of Algeria.

In 1962 he joins the 2 REP in 1963 and was invalided out after serving seven years after a parachute jump that ended in a collision with a stone farmhouse.

In the foreword to the book on page 12 he writes:

Perhaps the greatest part of my good fortune was the fact that the majority of the senior non-commissioned officers were of German origin and had served in the forces of their home;land during the Second World War (yes some had even served in the SS). The fact that I had been their enemy during hostilities did not cause any hatred or dislike.

In 1984 he became secretary-general of the Foreign Legion Association of Great Britain and in 1996 he became the associations historian.

He died age 75 in January 1999. Four legionnaires carried the coffin at his funeral.
Your book excerpt in bold, does not contradict what I wrote. And yes, I knew and liked Jim Worden. We got on very well, both being Londoners and I visited him often. He was getting quite poorly towards the end of his life, but in 1998 he still managed to join a little group of us from the British branch of the Legion Paras Association which attended the fiftieth anniversary celebrations of the formation of the first Legion airborne units.

Wayward Legionnaire is an excellent book and highly recommended.
 
Your book excerpt in bold, does not contradict what I wrote. And yes, I knew and liked Jim Worden. We got on very well, both being Londoners and I visited him often. He was getting quite poorly towards the end of his life, but in 1998 he still managed to join a little group of us from the British branch of the Legion Paras Association which attended the fiftieth anniversary celebrations of the formation of the first Legion airborne units.

Wayward Legionnaire is an excellent book and highly recommended.
His obit in the Telegraph in January 1999 is almost an A3 page long which the Telegraph only does for famous or notorious people. I photocopied it at the time and kept it in my copy of the book. It stated that he joined for the anonymity and refuge not adventure,

It mentions the incident in Algeria on one patrol when he was joined on stag one night by a sleepless and talkative legionnaire whom he did not recognise. When he searched for the man the next day, there was no sign of him. When he told his sergeant about the encounter, he learnt the soldier belonged to a unit that had been wiped out a year earlier in that very place.

It also says that he became an expert scrounger and fixer, and was able to supplement his sparse existence with winnings at poker. After one marathon session of 20 hours he rose from the table having won more than £2,600 (serious money in those days). The greater part of it was subsequenty blown in the regimental bordello.

It states that he never married. He sounds like he was a real character. As you say it is an excellent book. Probably the best one I have read about the FFL. Pretty tough conditions in those days.
 
Siegfried Freytag

This guy is interesting. WW2 Luftwaffe Ace, Knights Cross with 102 victories. Joined the Legion in 1952. Fought in Indochina and Algeria, serving until 1970.

I think he featured in a documentary made some time in the 1990's about the Legion old folks home at Puyloubier. There were some of his countrymen there as well who didn't want to be filmed. I think it was on YouTube somewhere.
 
It is the "éclaireur forêt" badge of the CEFE cadre. He was CO 3°REI, he probably wears it as a sign of loyalty to his former regiment.
Nails! Thanks. I would think that it is highly unusual for a General Officer to wear such a course brevet badge.
 
Nails! Thanks. I would think that it is highly unusual for a General Officer to wear such a course brevet badge.

Sometimes COs get presented badges as an honorary gesture but they normally don't wear it after the presentation.

It's often a way for the creator of a new badge to get the head shed onboard...

Regarding the éclaireur forêt badge it is modelled on the "éclaireurs skieurs" badge of the Chasseurs Alpins. It was created in 1996 when 3°REI was under the command of a COL who had started his carreer in the Chasseurs Alpins.
 
Latest Foreign Legion recruiting poster:
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And another directed at German speaking recruits:
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Not 2 REP, but sub-units of 3 REI and sappers from 1 REG on a rotational tour in French Guyana on an operation to counter illegal gold-mining in the jungle. Destruction of mine sites:
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2 REP .... Plus ca change ..............
 
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Video clip of a couple of French sports-fitness journalists/bloggers undertaking the standard French Army "Parcours du Combattant" obstacle course (500m long and twenty obstacles) in Carpiagne, the camp of 1 REC under the guidance of Major (UK WO1+ equivalent) Gerald from 1 RE, the Foreign Legion's Senior PT Instructor. It is around midday on the 9th July 2020 in the South of France and the temperature is over 30 degrees Celsius. They are carrying 22kg weight in the form of helmet, rifle and rucksack.

A point to note is that although the shape of the layout may differ slightly, all French military obstacle courses are identical in length and nature.

Edited to add: Although each Regiment must have such a standard obstacle course and regularly conduct training on it; other "assault courses" can be improvised. I particularly remember one in the early 1980's which combined ground obstacles with aerial ones in the tree canopy in the Jungle Training Centre at Zimba in the Central African Republic. The various obstacle courses in 3 REI in French Guyana are another case in point.

Additional items may also be carried on the obstacle course to make it more "interesting".
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A new "Promotion" starting in Camp Raffalli. The "Moniteur" inspecting his intake fresh from Basic Training. There is on average one "Promo" every month.
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A "Promotion de saut" or "Promo" is what the basic static line jumps course is called.

A "Moniteur Parachutiste" is a specially qualified Parachute Jumping Instructeur and Despatcher. Each company in 2 REP has several SNCOs thus qualified. The young Legionnaires in each "Promotion" are usually all destined for the Company which has the most need of manpower and this Company must provide the "Moniteur" and an "Aide-Moniteur" (normally a "Caporal") to make up the cadre for the "Promotion".

The "Promo" itself is usually two weeks of ground training in all the technical aspects of parachuting and lots of physical training, ending in the standard TAP (meaning "Troupes Aeroportes" or "Airborne Troops") tests. This is followed by a week of jumps. Six jumps are necessary to qualify. These include one where opening the reserve parachute is practiced, and at least two with full kit, container and rifle and one at night. To maintain qualification at least six jumps must be carried out annually. This figure is usually easily surpassed as the tempo of visiting transport aircraft providing jumps training is very high.

The young Legionnaires on the "Promotion" are housed in a small separate barrack block at the "Services Aeriens" (which is the internal Regimental branch that administers and coordinates all airborne training for 2 REP). At the end of the "Promotion" is a parade for all successful candidates, when each is awarded his "Brevet de Parachutiste" (or "Wings") and the "Fourrageres" (or Regimental Lanyards denoting Regimental Citations or Battle Honours) and thus officially becomes a member of the Regiment. Then follows a celebratory party in town, where everybody can enjoy themselves before the onset of several months of hard grind upon getting posted to their new Company.

Any former Repman returning to the Regiment from a posting to another Unit in the Legion must undergo a refresher course with the "Promo". Even though I never got posted out of the Regiment, when I did my long RTG course over five months with 2 REI in Nimes (before specialist training was moved to 4 RE) and subsequently had a month off on leave; I was informed by my grinning Company Commander upon return that I had been selected to be the "Aide Moniteur" on a "Promotion" starting the next Sunday (the new arrivals always came by Sat-Sun overnight boat from Marseille). Of course my fitness level had dropped in the past six months away from Calvi, but no way was I going to show that in front of the sprogs! I had a few days to beast myself, before I had to demonstrate how the new recruits needed to up their game in the REP.
 
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