How does the 2 REP (FFL) compare to the British Paras?

And there were many travellers with a light grey trousers and black polo neck in TGV between Montpellier and Paris....they boarded in Nîmes (2REI) in uniform and changed in the toilets...
As I understand it, the rules regarding wear of civilian clothes have been relaxed somewhat since when I was in (and about time too). I would hazard a guess that with the push to attract a higher standard (educationally) of recruit and more French speakers, it is quite likely that they will be relaxed even more. I would suggest that the ban on civvies for walking out should stop at the one year of service point at the most. I am already led to believe that the wearing of civilian clothes has been authorised temporarily due to the Islamic extremist terrorist threat.
 
As a follow up to my post above that touched upon the time when Legion basic training was carried out in Corte under the aegis of 2 REI (which was at the time split into a batallion sized combat unit, the "Groupement Operationel de la Legion Etrangere" or GOLE and a batallion sized training unit, the "Groupement d'Instruction de la Legion Etrangere" or GILE) I would like to post a video clip I have just found, made by an former 2 REP SNCO of his time in basic training there:

Here is another video clip (previously posted much earlier in the thread) of recruits in basic training (after the Kepi Blanc march of course) marching through Corte citadel:
 
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Legionnaires of 2 REP's 3rd (Amphibious) Company train in long-distance swimming in Calvi Bay.

This type of movement is used for night-time infiltration of small teams onto hostile coastlines in order to carry out various missions including: beach recce and marking for the landing of a larger force, DZ/ HLS recce and marking for follow-on forces, raiding and precision strike against specified targets. The teams are released to swim in at distances depending on the tactical situation and sea-state and can be deployed by various means: sub-surface, surface and air.

Picture taken from the official regimental Instagram feed.
 

LepetitCaporal

Old-Salt
As a follow up to my post above that touched upon the time when Legion basic training was carried out in Corte under the aegis of 2 REI (which was at the time split into a batallion sized combat unit, the "Groupement Operationel de la Legion Etrangere" or GOLE and a batallion sized training unit, the "Groupement d'Instruction de la Legion Etrangere" or GILE) I would like to post a video clip I have just found, made by an former 2 REP SNCO of his time in basic training there:

Here is another video clip (previously posted much earlier in the thread) of recruits in basic training (after the Kepi Blanc march of course) marching through Corte citadel:
There's some képi blancs in there that later became sous off and I served with...(trying to remember their names
Egg Banjo will recognise some, maybe?
 

LepetitCaporal

Old-Salt
As I understand it, the rules regarding wear of civilian clothes have been relaxed somewhat since when I was in (and about time too). I would hazard a guess that with the push to attract a higher standard (educationally) of recruit and more French speakers, it is quite likely that they will be relaxed even more. I would suggest that the ban on civvies for walking out should stop at the one year of service point at the most. I am already led to believe that the wearing of civilian clothes has been authorised temporarily due to the Islamic extremist terrorist threat.
True and semi true.... Legionnaires, in 2 REI anyway) rarely go out into town, (in Nîmes these days, admin purposes, bank etc..)
Random terrorist attacks etc

And there were many travellers with a light grey trousers and black polo neck in TGV between Montpellier and Paris....they boarded in Nîmes (2REI) in uniform and changed in the toilets...
At a certain time,...P.M.s would patrol the railway station in Nîmes and If you were caught wearing civvies or carrying in your sack...
You were driven back to regiment and your clothes were burned in front of the section and then off to the taule (jail) for a wee 15
It had to come to an end at some point...if not, you could have half the regiment in nick
 
French TV report on Operation Barkhane, embedded into a 2 REI based battle group:
 
For the Annual Bastille Day (14 July) celebrations this year, there will only be a static parade due to Covid-19. If it wasn't for the pandemic, it was postulated that 13 DBLE would have represented the Legion, as it is the 80th anniversary of the Regiment's establishment and initial combat deployment to Narvik and the subsequent declaration of the Regiment for the Free French Forces under De Gaulle. As tradition demands it, they would have been preceded by the Legion Pioneers followed by the Legion Band and as usual would have been the last unit in the marchpast on foot, due to the slower Legion marching pace. However this year, only the Legion Band will be present and it was filmed rehearsing for the event:
 
Newcomers to 2 REP's 1st Company get an initial taste of the Company's specialisation "combat en zone urbaine" or FIBUA as it is called in UK military parlance. Note the green DZ patches on the sleeve and green triangles on the back oft he helmets indicative of 1st Company "Les Verts".
 
A Légionnaire of the "Groupe PAT (Plongeurs de l'Armée de Terre)" meaning the Combat Diver Group, a small specialist element of 2 REP's 3rd (Amphibious) Company.
1594589979805.png

Picture from the 2 REP official Instagram feed.
 
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Legionnaires of 2 REP's 3rd (Amphibious) Company train in long-distance swimming in Calvi Bay.

This type of movement is used for night-time infiltration of small teams onto hostile coastlines in order to carry out various missions including: beach recce and marking for the landing of a larger force, DZ/ HLS recce and marking for follow-on forces, raiding and precision strike against specified targets. The teams are released to swim in at distances depending on the tactical situation and sea-state and can be deployed by various means: sub-surface, surface and air.

Picture taken from the official regimental Instagram feed.
That looks class. I'd never even considered the FFL. That pic and living and parachuting etc in Corsica makes me want to join them. I'm sure it will for loads of other men too.
 
That looks class. I'd never even considered the FFL. That pic and living and parachuting etc in Corsica makes me want to join them. I'm sure it will for loads of other men too.
I like your enthusiasm, but please read other parts of this thread and other sources before you get seduced by the glamorous aspects of it.

There is a lot of bullshit to wade through and the first year is psychologically very hard. You start off as the lowest of the low and learn to obey commands instantly. You will become an expert at cleaning, ironing and clothes folding before you get anywhere near the good stuff. You will be run ragged seemingly without rhyme or reason. If you are from a first world nation you will think that you have been warped back in time.

The Legion recruits from around the world and moulds its men (yes just men) into what it needs. Everyone becomes a cog in the red and green military machine, or is broken and spat out by the system.
 
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General Thierry Burkhard, former 2 REP and Foreign Legion Officer, now CEMAT or Chief of the General Staff of the French Army, has just released a 17 minute video explaining his vision to all his subordinates. Of course it is in French, but the gist that I get is that there is a well developed plan to prepare the French Army to meet all the requirements that are likely to be demanded of it over the next 10-20 years, where there is an expectation of increased likelihood of major conflict.

These requirements are to cover peer-to-peer symmetric warfare as well as asymmetric warfare of various sorts and an emphasis on interoperability nationally and internationally. The French are aiming to be able to deploy a division and will be exercising at this level by 2024.

The impression that I get is that he is also aiming to instill the sort of grit, psychological resilience, physical readiness and can-do attitude found in the Legion into the rest of the French Army. To this is to be added a systematic programme of major equipment modernisation and digitalisation. A review of military administrative structures and procedures with a view to paring down unneccessary duplication and layering in order to streamline and accelerate processes is also scheduled.

The relevant point here to keep within the thread topic is that 2 REP and the Foreign Legion in general have an established place in this plan, which presents a coherent and strategically sound way forward for the French Army to maintain its capability in supporting French policies nationally and within its EU and NATO commitments.

It is a pity that there is nothing of a similar nature being advocated so succinctly on this side of the channel.


Edited to add:

Here is a reasonable gist in Engish from "Defense News":
There is some wonky translation and misunderstanding, the most notable being: "....... the 114,000 French soldiers (of whom 77,000 are ground troops)" which should read ".......... of whom 77,000 are deployable ground combat troops".

The last point underlines the fact that currently easily over 10% of deployable ground combat troops in the French Army are Foreign Legionnaires.
 
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View attachment 488695
Legionnaires of 2 REP's 3rd (Amphibious) Company train in long-distance swimming in Calvi Bay.

This type of movement is used for night-time infiltration of small teams onto hostile coastlines in order to carry out various missions including: beach recce and marking for the landing of a larger force, DZ/ HLS recce and marking for follow-on forces, raiding and precision strike against specified targets. The teams are released to swim in at distances depending on the tactical situation and sea-state and can be deployed by various means: sub-surface, surface and air.

Picture taken from the official regimental Instagram feed.
I don't want to be picky, but they seem to be doing their night time ops in the day time.
 
I don't want to be picky, but they seem to be doing their night time ops in the day time.
I don't want to sound patronising, but you have to walk before you can run and you have to start this training in daytime and short distances and then progress onto night-time and longer distances. :cool:

ETA: It wouldn't make such a great picture at night either!
 
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I like your enthusiasm, but please read other parts of this thread and other sources before you get seduced by the glamorous aspects of it.

There is a lot of bullshit to wade through and the first year is psychologically very hard. You start off as the lowest of the low and learn to obey commands instantly. You will become an expert at cleaning, ironing and clothes folding before you get anywhere near the good stuff. You will be run ragged seemingly without rhyme or reason. If you are from a first world nation you will think that you have been warped back in time.

The Legion recruits from around the world and moulds its men (yes just men) into what it needs. Everyone becomes a cog in the red and green military machine, or is broken and spat out by the system.
I understand. I'm not in a position to join full time but if I was I would be joining the British military. These pictures look brilliant though, I'm sure there's other lads looking at it thinking it's great. It would definitely give me pause for thought.
 
I understand. I'm not in a position to join full time but if I was I would be joining the British military. These pictures look brilliant though, I'm sure there's other lads looking at it thinking it's great. It would definitely give me pause for thought.
Good thinking. If not in a position to join full time, maybe the Army Reserve might be a good option. There are some interesting units out there.
 

LepetitCaporal

Old-Salt
The 2 nd Regiment de Dragons will recieve the honours of the Bastille Day parade...
The 2 R.D. is a specialised regiment in N.B.R.C. warfare ( nuclear, biologlique, radiolo qiue and chimique) Based at Fontevraud - l' Abbaye in the Maine - et - Loire
(Light Cavelary)
Visit their site, theres some braw photo's of the thing's they do
 

LepetitCaporal

Old-Salt
I first heard that played at the military funeral for the two Commando Hubert blokes killed last year. It was quite impressive. As you know, French Naval Commando's have a strong link to the UK being part of 4 Commando and landing on D-Day with them.

New recruits being awarded their green berets on the seafront at Ouistreham by the surviving French veterans who landed there on the 6th June 1944.

The Bundeswehr also seem to play the tune, but I have never heard it played by a British army band, even a Jock one.
The Tune is from the time, as you pointed out, from the Jeanne d' Arc période... Bruce's address to his troops
The lyrics were..by
Robert Burns, centuries later , 'Scots wha hae' ?
as it happens, it is more perfect for the Legions marching pace than any other
 
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Calvi, home of the Rep, in the late 70s early 80s, a regimental police patrol led by Caporal Chef Kurt from Finland, 33 of age, who joined "for private rasons"...

Ahem, cough, a bit late to the party. Linked to previously. :)
Another portion is fine though.
 

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