How does the 2 REP (FFL) compare to the British Paras?

Again not 2 REP, but 4 RE the training regiment (and by extension indicative of the whole Legion).
A French press article about Adjudant-Chef (WO1 equivalent) Marco S. a German former REP man who is now the Officer in charge of all Messing, Accommodation and Leisure at 4 RE. A trained chef in Germany before joining the Legion in 2002, he was pinged for the specialisation "restauration, hôtellerie, loisirs" upon passing the selection tests and that is what he was posted into after completing his infantry specialist training in 2 REP. He remained in 2 REP for much of his career apart from a two year posting to DLEM in Mayotte. He was promoted to Adjudant-Chef at sixteen years of service and was posted to 4 RE in Castelnaudary.

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He is directly in charge of 38 (increasing shortly to 46) personnel, of which eight are SNCOs and the rest JNCOs and Legionnaires. (Note - there are no civilians or civilian contractors) among them: managers, purchasers, accountants, cooks/chefs, storemen, waiters, barmen and shop staff. They run the Cookhouse ("Ordinaire") and the club ("Foyer") for the Junior Ranks, the Sergeants' and Officers' Messes and their respective living-in accommodation (106 rooms in total at an average of 83% occupancy) and the on-camp general shop/store ("superette") for all the items personnel on the various courses need (particularly the recruits in basic training who cannot go off camp). Work is ongoing seven days a week throughout the year. The food and drink budget alone is 130,000 Euros per week. He is reported to quote a saying by Napoleon: "A soldier marches often, fights sometimes, but eats every day". One of his duties is to ensure that all his personnel maintain their soldier skills with regular training, rangework and military skills tests complemented by two military skills camps each year. First and foremost, they are Legionnaires.

I would comment that he is likely to be heading for a Commision to Officer and advancement to a senior G4 position in the Legion.

ETA: I would add another comment that this article appears to be part of a general thrust to recruit more French into the Foreign Legion and they are trying to show how well Legionnaires are looked after.
'to be heading for a Commission to Officer and advancement to a senior G4 position in the Legion.'
Stick (pain) before the carrot. The reduction in pay has - to my mind - always being a problem with getting good people into the training regiment. The reduction in parachute pay alone turned a lot of people off this vital task. Just a thought and I might be wrong with the way things work now
 
This takes me back a bit! Here's a short clip of a Regimental Police (called "Police Militaire" at the time) patrol in Calvi in the seventies. Althogh I got there in early 1982, the same Finnish Caporal-Chef Pietlainnen was doing the rounds, though this time with another Caporal-Chef called Diallo from Senegal I think. Considering that Pietlainnen was very pale and Diallo very dark, you could imagine the looks they got from tourists in the summer.

Clip from official 2 REP social media.
Note the winter walking out dress uniform worn by the "permissionnaires" and the one without a "permission" chit being taken back to camp. Also note quite a drab street in Calvi, looks like maybe the Rue Clemenceau, quite a dfifference to today if you go on GoogleMaps street view.
Ok Ok, last post re this post. We had to carry those effing useless wooden batons that were painted white like in the American movies - for 'crowd control'. He carried a very long thin rubber truncheon with lead in it. I really wanted one of those and eventually bought myself one when on leave. Then moved on from RMPs - so in the locker - and unbelievably I still have it now!
 
Ok Ok, last post re this post. We had to carry those effing useless wooden batons that were painted white like in the American movies - for 'crowd control'. He carried a very long thin rubber truncheon with lead in it. I really wanted one of those and eventually bought myself one when on leave. Then moved on from RMPs - so in the locker - and unbelievably I still have it now!
Gift it to a Female of Your acquaintance. Hopefully You'll have no more use for it..... :rolleyes:
 
And it's winter. Nothing to do, no women, bars closed - nothing to do except eat cakes, drink coffee and read the English papers until Emile's opened or the disco place near the citadel called Pardina (?)
The discotheque was “The Calypso” (Collapse-Oh) I think. I couldn't stand the music (naff seventies disco and Euro-schmaltz)and Eva with the big knuckles and gruff voice behind the bar, so I rarely went.

The “Son de Guitares” was always open, ran by an ex-Legionnaire called Pierre James with a fondness for "The Who" and "The Doors". Loads of beer, large video screen, decent enough pool table, good atmosphere. The main Anglophone hang-out. Sadly now gone and a restaurant in its place. Pierre was decent enough to let very inebriated souls sleep it off on the bar couches until they toddled off in early morning to get back in time for "Appel" on the parade square and join the ones that had carried on the motion all night and were about to puke their guts out on the early morning 20km hill run.

In the winter, as there was no tourist fanny and the local Corsican women were off limits unless you were at least on your second contract, SNCO and were going to get married to them (yes, some actually did) so it was off to one of the local knocking shops if you needed to ease the pressure off. There were three within walking distance of the camp (all gone now, I’m led to believe) and there usually was the odd tart or three hanging about the Calypso in town.
 
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'to be heading for a Commission to Officer and advancement to a senior G4 position in the Legion.'
Stick (pain) before the carrot. The reduction in pay has - to my mind - always being a problem with getting good people into the training regiment. The reduction in parachute pay alone turned a lot of people off this vital task. Just a thought and I might be wrong with the way things work now
Just after I left,, they brought a new system in, that automatically seconded personnel from the combat regiments to do a stint as an instructor either before or after the promotion courses (sometimes both) they were attending. Not sure what is in place now.
 

Bad Smell

Clanker
Looking at a couple of the images, the Legionaires carry pistols have them in what appears to be a Blackhawk Serpa style of holster. Would this be a version for the Beretta 92/G1 or simply a French knock off?

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Looking at a couple of the images, the Legionaires carry pistols have them in what appears to be a Blackhawk Serpa style of holster. Would this be a version for the Beretta 92/G1 or simply a French knock off?

View attachment 488240
Sorry, haven’t got a scooby.
 

lert

LE
Without need of any further information, I'm going to say that statistically it's a near certainty that (a) there was a chain of errors; (b) [there's something like an 80% probability that] jumper error was was the decisive factor, and (c) he had not yet completed 200 jumps.
At the risk of potentially derailling an excellent thread, the problem with such a statement is that there has been precisely zero scientific study of the effectiveness of proper parachute use in preventing gravity related injuries. Until a proper randomised study is carried out it's impossible to state with any degree of certainty the effect of parachute use on outcomes when jumping from a plane.

 
At the risk of potentially derailling an excellent thread, the problem with such a statement is that there has been precisely zero scientific study of the effectiveness of proper parachute use in preventing gravity related injuries. Until a proper randomised study is carried out it's impossible to state with any degree of certainty the effect of parachute use on outcomes when jumping from a plane.

Feel free to volunteer for the double-blind control experiment. :)
 
At the risk of potentially derailling an excellent thread, the problem with such a statement is that there has been precisely zero scientific study of the effectiveness of proper parachute use in preventing gravity related injuries. Until a proper randomised study is carried out it's impossible to state with any degree of certainty the effect of parachute use on outcomes when jumping from a plane.

I quote:
“natural history” studies of free fall indicate that failure to take or deploy a parachute does not inevitably result in an adverse outcome.4
The citation at '4' refers to a Serbian flight attendant blown out of a terror-bombed VC10 over Czechoslovakia in January 1972, whilst pinned by an in-flight service trolley to the innards of a large chunk of the disintegrated fuselage, which supplied both drag whilst she descended and did much to reduce the total share of the impact that her frame had to deal with.

Firstly (and I speak as a long-time old-skule skydiver) that ain't the kind of randomised trials I for which I would contemplate volunteering myself, and secondly, they'd have done better to cite the RAF tail-gunner whose fall was entirely unprotected until he breached pine treetop height, which would have been much closer to a pukka freefall.

I suspect that was published very early in the morning on the first day of the fourth month.
 
Stand-up, hook-up and shuffle to the door!
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A detachment of young Legionnaires from 2 REP in Calvi recently went to Corte in central Corsica (where part of 2 REI was based before 1983 - the other part were based in Bonifacio in the south of the island) in order to renovate the centrepiece and the 31 graves around it at the "Carré Militaire Légion de Corte" (i.e. the Legion cemetery in Corte). After the move from Algeria and up until 1976, Legion recruit and cadre traning was also carried out in Corte under the aegis of 2 REI. In 1976 the "Regiment d'Instruction de la Legion Etrangere" (RILE) was set up and training moved to Castelnaudary, where it was granted the custodianship of the Colours of 4 REI which had been dsibanded at the end of the Algerian War. In 1980 the RILE was renamed 4 RE
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There is of course a "Carré Militaire Légion" in Calvi for 2 REP:
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It is up on the same ridge WSW of Calvi Citadel where the recently mentioned Forts Charlet and Maillebois are situated. Legionnaires who have died in service are buried here unless their wills or their families have stipulated otherwise.
 
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I believe I have sussed you out, Condorttire..... certain meme
And from a while back
Well there’s enough info in my posts across ARRSE that anybody who got to know me in either the Foreign Legion or the British Army should be able to do so.
Happy to receive PMs from anyone who knows me.
 
I am posting from a phone in a TGV. Not the easiest to post long winded explanations !
Dit: I was delivering a Puma (the brand new super-fast AS332L2model) from the Eurocopter factory in Marseille when we glanced out of the starboard cockpit window to see that we were being overtaken by a TGV!

Admittedly we did have a bit of a headwind...
 
Dit: I was delivering a Puma (the brand new super-fast AS332L2model) from the Eurocopter factory in Marseille when we glanced out of the starboard cockpit window to see that we were being overtaken by a TGV!

Admittedly we did have a bit of a headwind...
To unashamedly continue this thread drift, while visiting my quite poorly FiL for the first time since before the C-19 lockdown, I idly browsed a train enthusiasts book on his bookshelf from the early seventies, where it already had a picture of one of the first TGVs. When I was in the Legion ten years later, many Legionnaires based in Nîmes and Orange were regularly using them for weekend breaks in Paris. Great engineering.
 
To unashamedly continue this thread drift, while visiting my quite poorly FiL for the first time since before the C-19 lockdown, I idly browsed a train enthusiasts book on his bookshelf from the early seventies, where it already had a picture of one of the first TGVs. When I was in the Legion ten years later, many Legionnaires based in Nîmes and Orange were regularly using them for weekend breaks in Paris. Great engineering.
And there were many travellers with a light grey trousers and black polo neck in TGV between Montpellier and Paris....they boarded in Nîmes (2REI) in uniform and changed in the toilets...
 

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