How does the 2 REP (FFL) compare to the British Paras?

3rd Company 2 REP practising parachuting into the sea in Calvi Bay:
Clip from 2 REP official social media

From about 22" to about 28" you gate a good view of the two old forts on the ridge WSW of Calvi Citadel. These are no longer military grounds but in my time, Fort Charlet was where the regimental confidence course ("piste de risque") was located and where the Regimental "Police Militaire" were based and to the south of it Fort Maillebois was the severe punishment prison for the Regiment (see my post on Legion discipline very early on in this thread). This was where recidivists, "hard cases" and deserters were sent when I first arrived in 2 REP. It was closed down in late 1982.
 
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A little light PT:
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Sniper Platoon on the range:
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2 REP on NBC training. The kit and drills appear to have come a long way since the early eighties, when I was in.
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A nice photographic composition.
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It reminds me of the time when we were on the square practising for a parade one Saturday morning, when a young attached conscript medical officer trainee ("Aspirant") splatted in front of us. He was sport parachuting with the Regimental SMPS - "Section Militaire de Parachutisme Sportif" a subsidised sport parachuting club. Something had gone terribly wrong.
 
Not 2 REP but 3 REI in French Guyana. They are conducing a joint operation with the Brazilian 22nd "Brigada de Infanteria de Selva" or Jungle Infantry Brigade against cross-border gold smugglers transporting gold from the illegal mines that sprout up constantly in the jungle of the frontier region:
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Not 2 REP but 1 REG, from which a Training Team is instructing the Senegalese Gendarmes in Counter-IED drills:
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It is quite likely that the above instructor is Senegalese himself.
 
when a young attached conscript medical officer trainee ("Aspirant") splatted in front of us
Without need of any further information, I'm going to say that statistically it's a near certainty that (a) there was a chain of errors; (b) [there's something like an 80% probability that] jumper error was was the decisive factor, and (c) he had not yet completed 200 jumps.
 
Without need of any further information, I'm going to say that statistically it's a near certainty that (a) there was a chain of errors; (b) [there's something like an 80% probability that] jumper error was was the decisive factor, and (c) he had not yet completed 200 jumps.
As a young ranker, not being privy to the inquiry, I would hazard a guess that you are right on all three points. I believe that it was the only parachuting fatality during my time in the Regiment.
 
Again not 2 REP, but 4 RE the training regiment (and by extension indicative of the whole Legion).
A French press article about Adjudant-Chef (WO1 equivalent) Marco S. a German former REP man who is now the Officer in charge of all Messing, Accommodation and Leisure at 4 RE. A trained chef in Germany before joining the Legion in 2002, he was pinged for the specialisation "restauration, hôtellerie, loisirs" upon passing the selection tests and that is what he was posted into after completing his infantry specialist training in 2 REP. He remained in 2 REP for much of his career apart from a two year posting to DLEM in Mayotte. He was promoted to Adjudant-Chef at sixteen years of service and was posted to 4 RE in Castelnaudary.

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He is directly in charge of 38 (increasing shortly to 46) personnel, of which eight are SNCOs and the rest JNCOs and Legionnaires. (Note - there are no civilians or civilian contractors) among them: managers, purchasers, accountants, cooks/chefs, storemen, waiters, barmen and shop staff. They run the Cookhouse ("Ordinaire") and the club ("Foyer") for the Junior Ranks, the Sergeants' and Officers' Messes and their respective living-in accommodation (106 rooms in total at an average of 83% occupancy) and the on-camp general shop/store ("superette") for all the items personnel on the various courses need (particularly the recruits in basic training who cannot go off camp). Work is ongoing seven days a week throughout the year. The food and drink budget alone is 130,000 Euros per week. He is reported to quote a saying by Napoleon: "A soldier marches often, fights sometimes, but eats every day". One of his duties is to ensure that all his personnel maintain their soldier skills with regular training, rangework and military skills tests complemented by two military skills camps each year. First and foremost, they are Legionnaires.

I would comment that he is likely to be heading for a Commision to Officer and advancement to a senior G4 position in the Legion.

ETA: I would add another comment that this article appears to be part of a general thrust to recruit more French into the Foreign Legion and they are trying to show how well Legionnaires are looked after.
 
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An FFL element (2°REI IIRC) is currently detached to the French elements in Senegal (EFS). The EFS role is to provide training team all over its AOR to various African nations.

This time, the EFS were training a senegalese Gendarmerie unit, the escadron de surveillance et d’intervention (ESI).

Senegal is universally considered as the strongpoint of the whole area as jihadist groups are spreading to various neighboring countries, exploiting bad governance and ethnic fractures.

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From the 2 REP Instagram page: Amphibious training in New Caledonia (COMMENT: possibly 3rd Company on their most recent our out there).
 
During a live fire exercise, 2 REP combat medics were called upon to practice their skills on an advanced medical injury simulacrum mannequin:
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As I understand, the mannequin can be adapted and programmed in various ways, to actively simulate various injuries and conditions and provides relevant vital signs responses upon treatment.
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This takes me back a bit! Here's a short clip of a Regimental Police (called "Police Militaire" at the time) patrol in Calvi in the seventies. Althogh I got there in early 1982, the same Finnish Caporal-Chef Pietlainnen was doing the rounds, though this time with another Caporal-Chef called Diallo from Senegal I think. Considering that Pietlainnen was very pale and Diallo very dark, you could imagine the looks they got from tourists in the summer.

Clip from official 2 REP social media.
Note the winter walking out dress uniform worn by the "permissionnaires" and the one without a "permission" chit being taken back to camp. Also note quite a drab street in Calvi, looks like maybe the Rue Clemenceau, quite a dfifference to today if you go on GoogleMaps street view.
That is a real memory swipe as I was in the RMP for a bit after my corporal's course - to let me understand how stupid the ordinary Legiannairre could be when he had a drink in him. (As if I needed reminding!) He was alright as it goes, very correct. In the sense, if you were wrong you were wrong and if you were ok - then enjoy yourself. And you would not have argued with him. He let me off once for not wearing the right kit when I was on leave in Calvi and walking from the town to the beach with a girlfriend. I would have to have changed uniform 3 times to get from my hotel room to the beach!
I was amazed when in the RMPs I saw him with his pet cat in the MPs billets. He called it 'me musk'. Really strange to see this 16 stone Fin cradling this small semi-wild cat - that only he could pick up.
 
This takes me back a bit! Here's a short clip of a Regimental Police (called "Police Militaire" at the time) patrol in Calvi in the seventies. Althogh I got there in early 1982, the same Finnish Caporal-Chef Pietlainnen was doing the rounds, though this time with another Caporal-Chef called Diallo from Senegal I think. Considering that Pietlainnen was very pale and Diallo very dark, you could imagine the looks they got from tourists in the summer.

Clip from official 2 REP social media.
Note the winter walking out dress uniform worn by the "permissionnaires" and the one without a "permission" chit being taken back to camp. Also note quite a drab street in Calvi, looks like maybe the Rue Clemenceau, quite a dfifference to today if you go on GoogleMaps street view.
And it's winter. Nothing to do, no women, bars closed - nothing to do except eat cakes, drink coffee and read the English papers until Emile's opened or the disco place near the citadel called Pardina (?)
 

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