How does the 2 REP (FFL) compare to the British Paras?

Is that a parachute emblem on the front of his Crucifix?
Could be St Michael, patron St. of paratroopers, with a canopy behind his head.

 
Yes the officer corps of the REP is known to be a hotbed of "Cathos tradi" with very large families. Not all 2°REP officers are like that but those who are tend to congregate there if they can.

The Chaplain you mentioned, Père Lallemand, is now 82 and has retired into prayers. Before being a priest, he was an officer in the "Commandos de Chasse", hunting the FLN guerrillas during the war in Algeria during which his brother, an officer, was KIA.
Père Lallemand was made Commandeur de la Légion d'honneur in 2012 which is very rare for a chaplain. He has over 900 parachute jumps.

View attachment 459692
He was the padre when I was at 2 REP - good bloke, could muck in with the toms.
 
Is it possible to elaborate on the incidents with the Spanish Policemen?
On 3 April 1941, LTN Roumiantzoff was in Spanish-occupied Tanger, waiting for a fishing boat to go clandestinely to Gibraltar. In a café he was arrested by 2 policemen. He opposed no resistance to the arrest; he was not searched; as soon as he was in a quiet street with the 2 policemen, he drew a pistol and killed them both. He then ran into the arab souk and hid at a female friend until 7 April. While preparing to go to Gibraltar again, he was betrayed by a neighbour.
He was then put in a train to a Spanish prison in Spanish Morocco with 2 policemen; when one went to the toilet, LTN Roumiantzoff, handcuffed, jumped on the other and managed to strangle him with the chain of his handcuff; in the fight, he was stabbed in the leg by the policeman he killed. He then jumped from the moving train but losing a lot of blood, he was recaptured.
He was then jailed in solitary confinement with very little food in the Ceuta fortress on 10 April 1941.
Seven months later, on 26 December 1941, after he had been sentenced to death, he managed to escape after taking hostage the director of the prison who had come to see his execution. He released him on the road outside the prison where a car was waiting for him. After his arrest of 10 April 1941, the French Résistance movements in Tangier had heard of his plight and had managed to have a pistol delivered to him in the prison and to organise this escape.
On 27 December, he finally boarded a boat to Gibraltar and landed there on 30 December 1941 and in London on 31 December 1941.
On the same day LTN Roumiantzoff went to 4, Carlton Gardens and joined the Free French Forces. He was introduced to Général de Gaulle and told him "I hope I will not disappoint"; de Gaulle answered "If I believe what I hear about you, that should not be the case"....he then asked him if he could call him "Roum" instead of "Roumiantzoff" and LTN Roumiantzoff said he had no objection at all. From then on, he would be known to all as "Le Roum".
 
On 3 April 1941, LTN Roumiantzoff was in Spanish-occupied Tanger, waiting for a fishing boat to go clandestinely to Gibraltar. In a café he was arrested by 2 policemen. He opposed no resistance to the arrest; he was not searched; as soon as he was in a quiet street with the 2 policemen, he drew a pistol and killed them both. He then ran into the arab souk and hid at a female friend until 7 April. While preparing to go to Gibraltar again, he was betrayed by a neighbour.
He was then put in a train to a Spanish prison in Spanish Morocco with 2 policemen; when one went to the toilet, LTN Roumiantzoff, handcuffed, jumped on the other and managed to strangle him with the chain of his handcuff; in the fight, he was stabbed in the leg by the policeman he killed. He then jumped from the moving train but losing a lot of blood, he was recaptured.
He was then jailed in solitary confinement with very little food in the Ceuta fortress on 10 April 1941.
Seven months later, on 26 December 1941, after he had been sentenced to death, he managed to escape after taking hostage the director of the prison who had come to see his execution. He released him on the road outside the prison where a car was waiting for him. After his arrest of 10 April 1941, the French Résistance movements in Tangier had heard of his plight and had managed to have a pistol delivered to him in the prison and to organise this escape.
On 27 December, he finally boarded a boat to Gibraltar and landed there on 30 December 1941 and in London on 31 December 1941.
On the same day LTN Roumiantzoff went to 4, Carlton Gardens and joined the Free French Forces. He was introduced to Général de Gaulle and told him "I hope I will not disappoint"; de Gaulle answered "If I believe what I hear about you, that should not be the case"....he then asked him if he could call him "Roum" instead of "Roumiantzoff" and LTN Roumiantzoff said he had no objection at all. From then on, he would be known to all as "Le Roum".
He didn't lead a boring life, did he?
 

LepetitCaporal

Old-Salt
medail16.png

Médaille de blessé...Wounded medal
I knew several légionnaires who wore this décoration, mainly from the Lebanon. It has since been supressed by the French Army
 
View attachment 459755
Médaille de blessé...Wounded medal
I knew several légionnaires who wore this décoration, mainly from the Lebanon. It has since been supressed by the French Army
Actually, after having been in limbo for a long period, being called sometimes an insignia and sometimes a medal, it is now officially allowed and has a legal document to back it up:

Le bulletin officiel des armées du 4 juin 2015 a diffusé une "INSTRUCTION PROVISOIRE N° 1403/DEF/EMAT/CAB/ADM/REC relative à l'attribution de l’insigne des blessés de guerre au personnel de l'armée de terre. Du 14 avril 2015".
- "L'insigne des blessés de guerre témoigne la reconnaissance et le soutien de la nation aux militaires blessés. Il est attribué aux militaires atteints d'une blessure de guerre constatée par le service de santé des armées et homologuée par le ministre de la défense.",
- "L'insigne des blessés de guerre est constitué d'un module bronze doré, de 30 mm constitué d'une étoile à cinq branches en émail rouge vif entourée d'une couronne mi-feuilles de chêne, mi-feuilles de laurier et d'un ruban de 50 mm de long et 35 mm de large, composé de la façon suivante : un liseré blanc de 1 mm suivi d'une bande bleue de 5 mm, raie blanche de 1 mm, bande bleue de 4 mm, raie blanche de 1 mm, raie jaune de 3 mm, raie blanche de 1 mm de part et d'autre d'une bande centrale rouge sang de 3 mm. Chaque blessure supplémentaire est matérialisée par une étoile émaillée rouge vif sur le ruban de l'insigne. La barrette de l'insigne des blessés de guerre est un rectangle du ruban décrit ci-dessus d'une longueur égale à la largeur du ruban et de 10 mm de hauteur. Les blessures sont matérialisées sur la barrette par autant d'étoiles que celle-ci peut en contenir."


It is thus still attributed as shown below with a cushion full of médaille des blessés being awarded in the 2°RIMa.

1585211434461.png


The decorations below belong to COL Héluin who, as a LTN, was the platoon commander who led the assault and retaking of the Serbian position on the Verbanja bridge in Sarajevo on 27 May 1995 during which he suffered a head wound. He had 2 KIA and about 10 WIA in that operation which is the last Op in which FRA troops used bayonets.
The médaille des blessés is the one with the red star.

1585211570347.png


LTN Héluin at the parade honouring the 2 soldiers of his platoon KIA on 27 May 1995 in Sarajevo
1585211714269.png
 
Yes the officer corps of the REP is known to be a hotbed of "Cathos tradi" with very large families. Not all 2°REP officers are like that but those who are tend to congregate there if they can.

The Chaplain you mentioned, Père Lallemand, is now 82 and has retired into prayers. Before being a priest, he was an officer in the "Commandos de Chasse", hunting the FLN guerrillas during the war in Algeria during which his brother, an officer, was KIA.
Père Lallemand was made Commandeur de la Légion d'honneur in 2012 which is very rare for a chaplain. He has over 900 parachute jumps.

View attachment 459692

He always has the right word. I attended a very moving funeral for a much loved 2 REI Caporal Chef at which Père Lallemand officiated. Mostly officers and their families in the chapel but full turnout in the cemetery.

Utmost respect for him.
 
I have never researched medals but I doubt there is such a resource like the National Archives where you can get the text of the citations.

France has always awarded a lot more medals that the UK (I think something like 92,000 living members of the LH are allowed for example with, on average, 2800 new members every year, including 320 foreigners) and there were more than a million croix de guerre during WW1. Today, there are still quite a lot of awards for bravery that would not guarantee a MiD in the UK.

As I wrote before, I once discussed the issue with a military psychiatrist and he told me that this liberal approach to awards was partly based on the recommendations of mental health specialists; if you get an award, you are less likely to wonder if what you did was worthwhile and less likely to question it and further down the line, to develop PTSD.
Thanks for the reply! The granddads was a legitimate award based on his actions, he also got the Military Medal (UK), i was trying to se if there was another version of the events out there - and yes, my dads was a mass ceremony for Op Dragoon - still nicer than anything the Brits ever did!!
 
Thanks for the reply! The granddads was a legitimate award based on his actions, he also got the Military Medal (UK), i was trying to se if there was another version of the events out there - and yes, my dads was a mass ceremony for Op Dragoon - still nicer than anything the Brits ever did!!
If you want to PM me your GD's details, I'll see what I can find . . .
 
Actually, after having been in limbo for a long period, being called sometimes an insignia and sometimes a medal, it is now officially allowed and has a legal document to back it up:

Le bulletin officiel des armées du 4 juin 2015 a diffusé une "INSTRUCTION PROVISOIRE N° 1403/DEF/EMAT/CAB/ADM/REC relative à l'attribution de l’insigne des blessés de guerre au personnel de l'armée de terre. Du 14 avril 2015".
- "L'insigne des blessés de guerre témoigne la reconnaissance et le soutien de la nation aux militaires blessés. Il est attribué aux militaires atteints d'une blessure de guerre constatée par le service de santé des armées et homologuée par le ministre de la défense.",
- "L'insigne des blessés de guerre est constitué d'un module bronze doré, de 30 mm constitué d'une étoile à cinq branches en émail rouge vif entourée d'une couronne mi-feuilles de chêne, mi-feuilles de laurier et d'un ruban de 50 mm de long et 35 mm de large, composé de la façon suivante : un liseré blanc de 1 mm suivi d'une bande bleue de 5 mm, raie blanche de 1 mm, bande bleue de 4 mm, raie blanche de 1 mm, raie jaune de 3 mm, raie blanche de 1 mm de part et d'autre d'une bande centrale rouge sang de 3 mm. Chaque blessure supplémentaire est matérialisée par une étoile émaillée rouge vif sur le ruban de l'insigne. La barrette de l'insigne des blessés de guerre est un rectangle du ruban décrit ci-dessus d'une longueur égale à la largeur du ruban et de 10 mm de hauteur. Les blessures sont matérialisées sur la barrette par autant d'étoiles que celle-ci peut en contenir."


It is thus still attributed as shown below with a cushion full of médaille des blessés being awarded in the 2°RIMa.

View attachment 459758

The decorations below belong to COL Héluin who, as a LTN, was the platoon commander who led the assault and retaking of the Serbian position on the Verbanja bridge in Sarajevo on 27 May 1995 during which he suffered a head wound. He had 2 KIA and about 10 WIA in that operation which is the last Op in which FRA troops used bayonets.
The médaille des blessés is the one with the red star.

View attachment 459762

LTN Héluin at the parade honouring the 2 soldiers of his platoon KIA on 27 May 1995 in SarajevoView attachment 459763
Hopefully they have stopped awarding the Croix de Valeur Militaire for getting wounded then. A Belgian Leg 1cl. in my company got a VM for getting some shrapnel in Beirut in 1982. The dozy twat was at a VCP when a couple of militiamen run out with an RPG and loosed a round off at him. He just stood there! And he got a friggin’ medal for it! I would have understood the wound decoration being awarded, but a VM!
 
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On 3 April 1941, LTN Roumiantzoff was in Spanish-occupied Tanger, waiting for a fishing boat to go clandestinely to Gibraltar. In a café he was arrested by 2 policemen. He opposed no resistance to the arrest; he was not searched; as soon as he was in a quiet street with the 2 policemen, he drew a pistol and killed them both. He then ran into the arab souk and hid at a female friend until 7 April. While preparing to go to Gibraltar again, he was betrayed by a neighbour.
He was then put in a train to a Spanish prison in Spanish Morocco with 2 policemen; when one went to the toilet, LTN Roumiantzoff, handcuffed, jumped on the other and managed to strangle him with the chain of his handcuff; in the fight, he was stabbed in the leg by the policeman he killed. He then jumped from the moving train but losing a lot of blood, he was recaptured.
He was then jailed in solitary confinement with very little food in the Ceuta fortress on 10 April 1941.
Seven months later, on 26 December 1941, after he had been sentenced to death, he managed to escape after taking hostage the director of the prison who had come to see his execution. He released him on the road outside the prison where a car was waiting for him. After his arrest of 10 April 1941, the French Résistance movements in Tangier had heard of his plight and had managed to have a pistol delivered to him in the prison and to organise this escape.
On 27 December, he finally boarded a boat to Gibraltar and landed there on 30 December 1941 and in London on 31 December 1941.
On the same day LTN Roumiantzoff went to 4, Carlton Gardens and joined the Free French Forces. He was introduced to Général de Gaulle and told him "I hope I will not disappoint"; de Gaulle answered "If I believe what I hear about you, that should not be the case"....he then asked him if he could call him "Roum" instead of "Roumiantzoff" and LTN Roumiantzoff said he had no objection at all. From then on, he would be known to all as "Le Roum".
Thats a story in itself!
 
Hopefully they have stopped awarding the Croix de Valeur Militaire for getting wounded then. A Belgian Leg 1cl. in my company got a VM for getting some shrapnel in Beirut in 1982. The dozy twat was at a VCP when a couple of militiamen run out with an RPG and loosed a round of at him. He just stood there! And he got a friggin’ medal for it! I would have understood the wound decoration being awarded, but a VM!
It still is the case. A wound in action almost guarantees a CVM. Comparison is no reason but the Germans also awarded the EKII for serious wounds during WW2.
 
Current estimates place the cost of COVID in France at a minimum of 300 billion Euros. I would not be surprised if in the future other operations are scaled down or stopped IOT cut on costs.
 
That's around 4300 EUR per person, man woman and child. Oops.
I think the EU will go for a huge stimulus plan once the crisis has blown over; the Krauts and the Cloggies will try to play the financial orthodoxy card but I think we will see debts and deficits in scales previously thought unbelievable....
 
Actually, after having been in limbo for a long period, being called sometimes an insignia and sometimes a medal, it is now officially allowed and has a legal document to back it up:

Le bulletin officiel des armées du 4 juin 2015 a diffusé une "INSTRUCTION PROVISOIRE N° 1403/DEF/EMAT/CAB/ADM/REC relative à l'attribution de l’insigne des blessés de guerre au personnel de l'armée de terre. Du 14 avril 2015".
- "L'insigne des blessés de guerre témoigne la reconnaissance et le soutien de la nation aux militaires blessés. Il est attribué aux militaires atteints d'une blessure de guerre constatée par le service de santé des armées et homologuée par le ministre de la défense.",
- "L'insigne des blessés de guerre est constitué d'un module bronze doré, de 30 mm constitué d'une étoile à cinq branches en émail rouge vif entourée d'une couronne mi-feuilles de chêne, mi-feuilles de laurier et d'un ruban de 50 mm de long et 35 mm de large, composé de la façon suivante : un liseré blanc de 1 mm suivi d'une bande bleue de 5 mm, raie blanche de 1 mm, bande bleue de 4 mm, raie blanche de 1 mm, raie jaune de 3 mm, raie blanche de 1 mm de part et d'autre d'une bande centrale rouge sang de 3 mm. Chaque blessure supplémentaire est matérialisée par une étoile émaillée rouge vif sur le ruban de l'insigne. La barrette de l'insigne des blessés de guerre est un rectangle du ruban décrit ci-dessus d'une longueur égale à la largeur du ruban et de 10 mm de hauteur. Les blessures sont matérialisées sur la barrette par autant d'étoiles que celle-ci peut en contenir."


It is thus still attributed as shown below with a cushion full of médaille des blessés being awarded in the 2°RIMa.

View attachment 459758

The decorations below belong to COL Héluin who, as a LTN, was the platoon commander who led the assault and retaking of the Serbian position on the Verbanja bridge in Sarajevo on 27 May 1995 during which he suffered a head wound. He had 2 KIA and about 10 WIA in that operation which is the last Op in which FRA troops used bayonets.
The médaille des blessés is the one with the red star.

View attachment 459762

LTN Héluin at the parade honouring the 2 soldiers of his platoon KIA on 27 May 1995 in SarajevoView attachment 459763
After seeing many of the photos on this thread, it looks a bit odd to see French troops wearing a beret with the badge over on the left side.
 

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