How does the 2 REP (FFL) compare to the British Paras?

The French don’t do “MERT” as we’d recognise it from HERRICK, for a whole host of reasons.

First of all, Mali is not Helmandshire, so the range and scale of medical care change are very different.

Second, the methodology of injury is not necessarily the same, thus the style of medical care will be different.

Thirdly, and most importantly, the French philosophy of medical care is as national as the UK one. To transpose it to the civilian sector, SAMU/SMUR is not the same as our local Ambulance trust. “Stay and Play” (to use the parlance) is much more entrenched, and thus Doctors are normally much further “forward”. In French Military Medical Doctrine, each Coy Gp will be provided with a fully trained GP (with trauma upskilling) in the RAP, with a Surgical Team much further forward than we’d expect. If your French is good enough, the doctrine can be found at


Have fun!
I think that (the forward RAP surgical team) was what was being loaded onto the RAF Chinook in the clip I linked to above.
 
The French don’t do “MERT” as we’d recognise it from HERRICK, for a whole host of reasons.

First of all, Mali is not Helmandshire, so the range and scale of medical care change are very different.

Second, the methodology of injury is not necessarily the same, thus the style of medical care will be different.

Thirdly, and most importantly, the French philosophy of medical care is as national as the UK one. To transpose it to the civilian sector, SAMU/SMUR is not the same as our local Ambulance trust. “Stay and Play” (to use the parlance) is much more entrenched, and thus Doctors are normally much further “forward”. In French Military Medical Doctrine, each Coy Gp will be provided with a fully trained GP (with trauma upskilling) in the RAP, with a Surgical Team much further forward than we’d expect. If your French is good enough, the doctrine can be found at


Have fun!
ISTR that this was a source of controversy with the Diana crash.

"Why didn't you stabilize her and head to A&E?"
 
ISTR that this was a source of controversy with the Diana crash.

"Why didn't you stabilize her and head to A&E?"
“Stay and play” v “Scoop and run”.

MERT could be characterise as “Scoop and Play”!
 
How many recruits actually finish training?
It depends ............ ;-)
Depends on the qualities of that particular intake I suppose. With seven applicants for each place they don't have problems with a quota system governing pass-rates.
Absolutely.

Whilst the Foreign Legion aims to get the best elements of each volunteer selection (at 1 RE in Aubagne) and recruit intake (at 4 RE in Castelnaudary) through basic training and into the field regiments, there is considerable variation of quality. As was mentioned in a recent post above, the minimum criteria for selection to commence Legion basic training are the same standards that are applied to French regular army infantry recruits. The main difference in Legion selection is the assessment by the cadres of: "Is this bloke going to hack it and cope with the extra psychological stresses imposed by the Legion's particularities in basic training and then in continuity training in his destination regiment?" I would hazard a guess, that in order to get the desired numbers into recruit training; sometimes the benefit of the doubt may be given in this regard.

As regards how many actually complete basic training, I cannot give a figure as I do not know. But I do know that it is influenced by a multitude of factors pertinent to and potentially different in each recruit platoon ("section" in French).

I can only give one firm example and that is from my own training platoon over the winter of 1981-82. I joined up in Fort de Nogent in Paris. From what I saw, I would (very) roughly estimate that about 60% of potential recruits that turned up there passed the pre-selection process and got sent to 1 RE in Aubagne. There followed a very severe winnowing process with maybe 20-25% being sent on to 4 RE at Castelnaudary for training. My training platoon was very large - I cannot recall how many to begin with, but I believe that it was well over 50 strong. Seventy-two seems to ring a bell, but it seems excessive now looking back. We were housed in Caserne Lapasset, a 19th century prison-like barracks in the centre of town, in a huge long dormitory on the third or fourth floor, in three-tier bunks. Recruits dropped out or were back-squadded for various reasons (there were no successful desertions in basic training). The figures that stick in my head were 32 passing out on the final parade after four months, out of which 28 were from the original squad. Though again, I may be mistaken - it was a long time ago. I do not know if this was standard or just an anomaly at the time.

I am led to believe that the basic training completion rate is much better these days.
 
The French don’t do “MERT” as we’d recognise it from HERRICK, for a whole host of reasons.

First of all, Mali is not Helmandshire, so the range and scale of medical care change are very different.

Second, the methodology of injury is not necessarily the same, thus the style of medical care will be different.

Thirdly, and most importantly, the French philosophy of medical care is as national as the UK one. To transpose it to the civilian sector, SAMU/SMUR is not the same as our local Ambulance trust. “Stay and Play” (to use the parlance) is much more entrenched, and thus Doctors are normally much further “forward”. In French Military Medical Doctrine, each Coy Gp will be provided with a fully trained GP (with trauma upskilling) in the RAP, with a Surgical Team much further forward than we’d expect. If your French is good enough, the doctrine can be found at


Have fun!
Thanks, the linked to document essentially only covers initial forward medical procedures.
 
Absolutely.

Whilst the Foreign Legion aims to get the best elements of each volunteer selection (at 1 RE in Aubagne) and recruit intake (at 4 RE in Castelnaudary) through basic training and into the field regiments, there is considerable variation of quality. As was mentioned in a recent post above, the minimum criteria for selection to commence Legion basic training are the same standards that are applied to French regular army infantry recruits. The main difference in Legion selection is the assessment by the cadres of: "Is this bloke going to hack it and cope with the extra psychological stresses imposed by the Legion's particularities in basic training and then in continuity training in his destination regiment?" I would hazard a guess, that in order to get the desired numbers into recruit training; sometimes the benefit of the doubt may be given in this regard.

As regards how many actually complete basic training, I cannot give a figure as I do not know. But I do know that it is influenced by a multitude of factors pertinent to and potentially different in each recruit platoon ("section" in French).

I can only give one firm example and that is from my own training platoon over the winter of 1981-82. I joined up in Fort de Nogent in Paris. From what I saw, I would (very) roughly estimate that about 60% of potential recruits that turned up there passed the pre-selection process and got sent to 1 RE in Aubagne. There followed a very severe winnowing process with maybe 20-25% being sent on to 4 RE at Castelnaudary for training. My training platoon was very large - I cannot recall how many to begin with, but I believe that it was well over 50 strong. Seventy-two seems to ring a bell, but it seems excessive now looking back. We were housed in Caserne Lapasset, a 19th century prison-like barracks in the centre of town, in a huge long dormitory on the third or fourth floor, in three-tier bunks. Recruits dropped out or were back-squadded for various reasons (there were no successful desertions in basic training). The figures that stick in my head were 32 passing out on the final parade after four months, out of which 28 were from the original squad. Though again, I may be mistaken - it was a long time ago. I do not know if this was standard or just an anomaly at the time.

I am led to believe that the basic training completion rate is much better these days.
I completed infantry recruit training in the mid eighties, and it was f*****g hard. There were a number of infantry training depots back then, the drop out rate was about two thirds across them all.
 
The French don’t do “MERT” as we’d recognise it from HERRICK, for a whole host of reasons.

First of all, Mali is not Helmandshire, so the range and scale of medical care change are very different.

Second, the methodology of injury is not necessarily the same, thus the style of medical care will be different.

Thirdly, and most importantly, the French philosophy of medical care is as national as the UK one. To transpose it to the civilian sector, SAMU/SMUR is not the same as our local Ambulance trust. “Stay and Play” (to use the parlance) is much more entrenched, and thus Doctors are normally much further “forward”. In French Military Medical Doctrine, each Coy Gp will be provided with a fully trained GP (with trauma upskilling) in the RAP, with a Surgical Team much further forward than we’d expect. If your French is good enough, the doctrine can be found at


Have fun!
IIRC during Serval, the French took higher force protection measures for their troops to reduce the risk of more serious injury, as well as pushing doctors/medics forward because of the distances involved.

Similarly, the French have a rule regarding the amount of medical support that must be on hand for a given number of soldiers. In Mali at a certain point, according to the French G-4, doctrine dictated that they needed to have the ability to perform 12 major surgeries at the same time when in fact they could only support 2.35 French officers also disclosed that they were not capable of providing the “golden hour” standard of medical support called for by French doctrine for all of the operations going on at the same time. In at least one instance, they had to choose not to provide golden hour coverage to one operation to provide it to another.

 
IIRC during Serval, the French took higher force protection measures for their troops to reduce the risk of more serious injury, as well as pushing doctors/medics forward because of the distances involved.

Similarly, the French have a rule regarding the amount of medical support that must be on hand for a given number of soldiers. In Mali at a certain point, according to the French G-4, doctrine dictated that they needed to have the ability to perform 12 major surgeries at the same time when in fact they could only support 2.35 French officers also disclosed that they were not capable of providing the “golden hour” standard of medical support called for by French doctrine for all of the operations going on at the same time. In at least one instance, they had to choose not to provide golden hour coverage to one operation to provide it to another.

Thanks @smallbrownprivates That American article provides an excellent explanation of the “GTIA” & “SGTIA” concepts and the French military embrace of “rusticity” as a force multiplier and enabler on expeditionary operations. The Foreign Legion takes “rusticity” very seriously and its troops are always mentally prepared to have to achieve more with less.
 
Bad news from Mali.


A Tigre attack helicopter and a Cougar transport heliciopter collided at low level while participating in a counter-terrorist operation in the Liptako area in the evening of 25 Nov. All thirteen personnel on board both airframes were killed in the crash.

An official communique has been released:

Seven were from 5 RHC (Régiment d’hélicoptères de combat) based in Pau
Four were from 4 RC (Régiment de chasseurs) based in Gap
One was from 93 RAM (Régiment d’artillerie de montagne) based at Varces
One was from 2 REG (Régiment étranger de génie) based at Saint Christol

RIP mes freres d'armes
 

Looks like that the Legion will have use made of it for a long time.
With a 7:1 applicant/recruit ratio, I guess Crapaudita or whatever the French recruitment contractor equivalent is, need not apply
 

Looks like that the Legion will have use made of it for a long time.
With a 7:1 applicant/recruit ratio, I guess Crapaudita or whatever the French recruitment contractor equivalent is, need not apply
That's what I believe too and there is scope for further enlargement due to poor regular recruiting as most young Frenchmen do not see a career in the military as something to aspire to. As far as I know there is no contractor for forces recruiting in France and it is done "in house". That is certainly the case for the Foreign Legion.

The GOC Foreign Legion hinted earlier this year that he was looking at increasing the possibility for Legionnaires to do long postings overseas (2-3 years). These are highly sought after as they are competitively remunerative and are accompanied for married Caporaux-Chefs and above. Also doing a long posting overseas is good for retention as in many cases it entails an extension of the initial or subsequent contracts.

At present the Legion only has two units permanently based overseas where this is possible 3 REI and DLEM of which the latter is only a headquarters company with additional companies posted on short (4 month) rotations in from other regiments. This is down from four in my time 13 DBLE, 5 RMP (later reverted to 5 RE) and larger versions of 3 REI and DLEM. There is scope for more, although this is likely to be fiercely resisted by the "Troupes de Marine" whose regiments man most of the permanent overseas bases and would probably lose out.

p.s. Whoever chose that irrelevant picture in the referred to article should be subjected to at least a couple of hours of "la pelote".
 
Emphasising the fact that the Legion is trying to recruit more French natives, the following advertisement has recently been published:
1575402674919.png

The FOREIGN LEGION​
Recruiters inform you that:​
Frenchmen cannot join - False​
It is comprised completely of criminals - False​
Physical ability needs to be exceptional - False​
Recruitment process takes 21 days - True​
And in case you haven't got all the information?​
- Frenchmen can join. They currently man above 10% of the Legion strength and are essential to its functionality.​
- The Legion recruits between the ages of 17 to 40 without any need for an educational attainment certificate.​
- The selection process lasts about three weeks and is composed of mental, medical and physical tests.​
- Our vocation since 1831: Creating professional soldiers.​
Rebrand yourself, change your life and become part of the elite.​


For Frenchmen, the Legion does offer some recruiting advantages over the French Regular Army.
Minor criminal convictions are not a bar to recruitment in the Legion.
The French Regular Army only recruits up to age thirty.
The French Regular Army requires a certificate of completion of secondary level education.
The French Regular Army recruitment process can be quite long, slow and laborious
(Though nowhere near the current painful British Army process.)

There seems to be a shrinking pool of volunteer recruits to the French Armed Forces (Army in particular). The Legion is likely to be accursed of unfairly fishing in the Regular Army's pool.
 
Not sure if I've posted this or a similar video clip before. If I have, apologies.

It's a 11eme Brigade Parachutiste GCP "Groupement Commando Parachutiste" ,(including personnel from 2 REP's GCP) HAHO insertion for a forty man operation in a remote part of western Mali.
Points to note: First use of an Airbus A400M for a parachute operation; medical support to the team provided by a free-fall qualified medical officer as well as a medic who is being carried in a tandem harness; the boss, a Captain Solveig (as I heard it) is quoted as jumping at a total weight of 160kg; the plane is flying at 240km/h at an altitude of 4000m; there is a 10km parachute insertion flight, to be followed by a foot insertion to the target area.

 
Some other things I picked up - use of English in the aircraft (the countdown t jump was done in English). It fits with what I know of FAF procedures.

Also good to have cross-correlation of French Medical Doctrine!

ps - the embedded video doesn’t work for me, but I found it on FaceAche.
 
I’ve been googling - I’ve found a fair few reference to “Parachute Train Regiment”. I presume this is a truncated auto-translate, and they actually mean “Parachute Training Regiment”...

That, or the A400 can carry a serious load.
 
I’ve been googling - I’ve found a fair few reference to “Parachute Train Regiment”. I presume this is a truncated auto-translate, and they actually mean “Parachute Training Regiment”...

That, or the A400 can carry a serious load.
"Train" in French military parlance refers to logistics/supply. It harks back to the waggon trains that used to supply the armies of yore.
 
"Train" in French military parlance refers to logistics/supply. It harks back to the waggon trains that used to supply the armies of yore.
Ah...
 

Papa Fox

Old-Salt
I’ve been googling - I’ve found a fair few reference to “Parachute Train Regiment”. I presume this is a truncated auto-translate, and they actually mean “Parachute Training Regiment”...

That, or the A400 can carry a serious load.
1er Regiment du Train Parachutiste
1575414153858.png


As Condottiere mentionned the 1st "Logistics/Projection" Airborne Regiment is tasked to support the 11th Airborne Brigade and have a specialist support role to facilitate the Brigade air projection and airborne capacity.

Below is a short video on the type of service they can provide such as dropping bulldozers

A capacity that was used operationally in Timbuktu in 2013
 
The jump seen above, in #5813, was freefall off the ramp. Does anyone know if the slipstream 'problems' with the more normal use of the side-doors been solved yet? Or maybe it's one door only, or ??
 

Papa Fox

Old-Salt
The jump seen above, in #5813, was freefall off the ramp. Does anyone know if the slipstream 'problems' with the more normal use of the side-doors been solved yet? Or maybe it's one door only, or ??
Up to 80 paratroopers would have jumped from both doors at the same time (2x40) recently according to the source below

 

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