How does the 2 REP (FFL) compare to the British Paras?

Castaldi is the grandson of the Oscar winning French actress Simone Signoret. He made his name with the French equivalent of Big Brother, Loft Story. One of his ex wives accused the British photographer David Hamilton of abusing her when she was 13, he committed suicide shortly after. My daughter was at school with his son. Sorry for the thread drift!
 
Nice pics of a sea jump by men of 2 REP's 3rd Company. Apparently this is the first time the new EPC parachute system has been used for this.
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Pictures taken from the 2 REP Facebook page.
 
Only extremely tangentially connected to 2 REP. The Legion's 3 REI runs all the French military jungle courses in French Guyana.

This clip is a report by a French journalist attached to a course run for aspiring combat arms officers as part of their officer training and it includes women, who are expected to do the same as the men. It is not a jungle warfare course, more an endurance/ survival/ leadership skills course.

The main instructor featured is a bit of a beast, a German Sergent-Chef (S/C) called Reinhardt, whose French is very good and almost accentless and who is described as having joined the Legion at the age of twenty, thirteen years previously and having served in Calvi (i.e. at 2 REP) and in Djibouti (i.e presumabl at 13 DBLE when they were there, so pre-2011)
Greetings Condottiere. My understanding is that "les gris" / 4th company have some of their chefs de groupe & chefs de section (Section & Platoon leaders) who have done or are sent to CEFE, this linked to the 4th company new specialty (Forest and behind the lines operations).
 
Here is an interesting retex (or post training review) by François-Michel Le Tourneau a French scientist who has done the 7 week long "Stage Jaguar" or Jungle Platoon Leader Course.

This text presents reflections on my participation in the "jungle platoon leader" training course organized by the French Foreign Legion in its training center in French Guiana, the Training Centre in Equatorial Forest (CEFE). Besides describing the running of the course in the manner of a field book, I compare the teachings received on this occasion with others from other contexts, including with my experience among Native Americans. In taking stock of the contributions of this adventure for the practice of geography in the Amazonian forest, I finally answer a question that Molière would not have disowned: "What the Hell would he be doing in this galley?".

Click on the link below for the full article in French
Deux mois à la Légion : une autre vision de la forêt
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Greetings Condottiere. My understanding is that "les gris" / 4th company have some of their chefs de groupe & chefs de section (Section & Platoon leaders) who have done or are sent to CEFE, this linked to the 4th company new specialty (Forest and behind the lines operations).
Sure and 2 REP also does rotational company tours in Guyane,
 
Here is an interesting retex (or post training review) by François-Michel Le Tourneau a French scientist who has done the 7 week long "Stage Jaguar" or Jungle Platoon Leader Course.

This text presents reflections on my participation in the "jungle platoon leader" training course organized by the French Foreign Legion in its training center in French Guiana, the Training Centre in Equatorial Forest (CEFE). Besides describing the running of the course in the manner of a field book, I compare the teachings received on this occasion with others from other contexts, including with my experience among Native Americans. In taking stock of the contributions of this adventure for the practice of geography in the Amazonian forest, I finally answer a question that Molière would not have disowned: "What the Hell would he be doing in this galley?". ............................
Noticed that the above paragraph appears to be a google translate of the opening paragraph of the linked report. I would say that, in my opinion, the last sentence would be better translated idiomatically as : "What the fark was he doing in this hell-hole?" :)

Edited to add - pic of the report author:
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Ze jangel - it faacks you up. :)
François-Michel Le Tourneau - Wikipedia
 
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Here is an interesting retex (or post training review) by François-Michel Le Tourneau a French scientist who has done the 7 week long "Stage Jaguar" or Jungle Platoon Leader Course. ..............................................................
Some interesting points:

1. The course is divided into three phases: Firstly a "toughening-up" ("aguerrissement") phase concentrating on extreme physical exercise, jungle movement and jungle survival techniques. Then comes the combat phase when various jungle-warfare scenarios are taught and practiced. Then the last phase is a confirmation phase when all the principles and techniques taught on the first two phases are tested.

2. This is a course aimed at Junior Officers and SNCOs but everyone is just known by a number and the "fack-about-factor" is applied liberally during much of the course to push people to physical and mental extremes, this includes additional collective physical exercise applied to a team for any individual faults or failures made by a member of that team. The report indicates that apparently this is a cause for many foreign students from western nations to drop out. it is stated that two out of every three Americans and British and on one of every two Germans and Canadians drop out.

3. The report author stated that despite the formidable array of natural hazards in the jungle that preys on the mind before undertaking the course, the course demonstrated that it was possible to maintain functionality and not be overly adversely affected. However he did add that half the course ended up getting Leishmaniasis.

I wonder if there is an unclassified open report about this course by a successful British Armed Forces attendee?
 
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Another gratuitous parachuting picture :)
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(from the official 2 REP Twitter feed)
 
Tcacd : Moussoro
I helped in building the left tower on my first tour in Tchad. ..did 3 in total = more than a year
In early 1984,
Third Company, 2 REP built the camp at Biltine in Chad in early 1984, in between LRDG type patrols in the north. It was our R&R task :)
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Edited to add: When we took over the site (from the French Regulars), it was a tented camp. We actually made and sun-baked the mud bricks we used ourselves as well!
“Legionnaire, soldat et batisseur!”
 
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An interesting read. WrItten by a former Canadian REP GCP.
Appel: A Canadian in the French Foreign Legion is the first-hand account of the author’s six years as a professional soldier during the 1990s, and his experience in the Legion’s elite Group Commando Parachutistes (GCP). Joel Struthers recounts the dangers and demands of military life, from the rigours of recruitment and operational training in the rugged mountains of France, to face-to-face combat in the grasslands of some of Africa’s most troubled nations.

His facebook page: Appel: A Canadian in the French Foreign Legion

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Told through the eyes of a soldier, and interspersed with humorous anecdotes, Appel is a fascinating story that debunks myths about the French Foreign Legion and shows it more accurately as a professional arm of the French military. Struthers provides insight into the rigorous discipline that the Legion instills in its young recruits, – who trade their identities as individuals for a life of adventure and a role in a unified fighting force whose motto is “Honour and Loyalty.”

Foreword by Col. Benoit Desmeulles, former commanding officer of the Legions 2e Régiment Étranger Parachutistes.

Langley author recounts service in the French Foreign Legion - Aldergrove Star
 
From the Appel book's Facebook link above:
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This is what looks like a young 2 REP newish arrival.

Note the typical living accommodation for junior ranks. It is usually eight to a room and what you see is one man's personal space: A bed, a bedside locker and that's it. All your belongings are either in this space or in a standard metal trunk (called a "cantine") that each individual has in the platoon storeroom for non day-to-day stuff. Quite spartan by today's "first world" army standards.

You live communally with your comrades.
 
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I remember the day well when we were issued the new lockers (have a photo some where).
The beds aren't like ours were. Might be new issue
Lockers and beds are not like in the early eighties (left over from the sixties). Lockers were smaller and beds were stackable. Everyone also had a metal frame footstool with a plywood seat (tabouret):
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I believe these are still in use - simple and solid. I remember a thief's hand being pinned to one with a Camillus.
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I remember the day well when we were issued the new lockers (have a photo some where).
The beds aren't like ours were. Might be new issue
I recall having metal lockers in the 1ere Cie, but upon moving to the CCS, discovered the luxury of wood. In the second photo, you can see the built-in wardrobes arranged at one end of the dormitory. iirc correctly, we were six to eight per room. I have no idea why the beds weren't aligned with the bedside lights :)
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I recall having metal lockers in the 1ere Cie, but upon moving to the CCS, discovered the luxury of wood. In the second photo, you can see the built-in wardrobes arranged at one end of the dormitory. iirc correctly, we were six to eight per room. I have no idea why the beds weren't aligned with the bedside lights :)
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Would never get that in a Compagnie de Combat!
For those who don't know what CCS stood for: "Compagnie de Commandement et Services" i.e. HQ Coy.
 

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