How does the 2 REP (FFL) compare to the British Paras?




For lovers of the bugle:

FAMAS

As mentioned in many posts in this thread, this rifle has never been called “the bugle” (“le clairon”) by serving French soldiers. Marketing types pushed the nickname in the late seventies and some journos picked it up.

The lower picture in this post is not representative of a great rifle in service for forty years which proved itself on many operations and theatres around the world. I have never seen such a totally impractical "banana magazine" and I have no idea what the two pistol grip assembly is for, it doesn't even look as if it belongs with the FAMAS.

Edited to add - after a quick google search the bottom right two-pistol grip weapon was a 90's prototype for a personal defence weapon by GIAT industries. The fifty round "banana magazine" on the FAMAS appears to have been a manufactiurer's flight of fancy and was never adopted.

I have commented on the FAMAS several times already on this thread and others on ARRSE. It was a cracking weapon and after using it for five years in the Legion, I was presented with the abortion that was the SA80 A1 when I joined the British Army. The A2 version which came later was better but still not as practical and comfortable as a field weapon compared to the FAMAS.

The FAMAS was replaced and not upgraded because the assembly lines and tooling for it had been scrapped and the very effective, efficient and field-maintenance friendly (no gas parts) delayed blowback mechanism necessitated steel cartridges as brass distorted on ejection, therefore was not compatible with NATO standard ammunition (despite the identical calibre) and was more expensive.

The HK 416F is a practical and timely replacement.
 
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New gucci kit coming for French SF, would this apply to FFL too?



Photo credit: The Doc (JPW)
See my post of Feb 7th.
#5,287

You'll find alot of European armies are rolling out new kit these days, I know the German have their own equivalent program which I've poked my nose at, I know the French are replacing the FAMAS (can't remember with what) so I'm guessing the kit will go also be slowly "modernized". I would think it was about time anyway as CCE camo has been in for decades now,
As mentioned in my post quoted above, the cammo pattern itself for most of the army seems to be being retained (the fabric and the cut/design of the uniforms is changing). What is shown on the left hand mannequin is a proposed pattern for French SF troops.
 
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As mentioned in many posts in this thread, this rifle has never been called “the bugle” (“le clairon”) by serving French soldiers. Marketing types pushed the nickname in the late seventies and some journospicked it up.

The lower picture in this post is not representative of a great rifle in service for forty years which proved itself on many operations and theatres around the world. I have never seen such a totally impractical "banana magazine" and I have no idea what the two pistol grip assembly is for, it doesn't even look as if it belongs with the FAMAS.

Edited to add - after a quick google searchthe bottom right two-pistol grip weapon was a 90's prototype for a personal defence weapon by GIAT industries. The fifty round "banana magazine" on the FAMAS appears to have been a manufactiurer's flight of fancy and was never adopted.

I have commented on the FAMAS several times already on this thread and others on ARRSE. It was a cracking weapon and after using it for five years in the Legion I was presented with the abortion that was the SA80 A1 when I joined the British Army. The A2 version which came later was better but still not as practical and comfortable as a field weapon compared to the FAMAS.

The FAMAS was replaced and not upgraded because the assembly lines and tooling for it had been scrapped and the very effective, efficient and field maintenance friendly (no gas parts) delayed blowback mechanism necessitated steel cartridges as brass distorted on ejection, therefore was not compatible with NATO standard ammunition (despite the identical calibre) and was more expensive.

The HK 416F is a practical and timely replacement.
Does the FAMAS have a bolt and bolt carrier assembly as per SA80?
 

Joker62

ADC
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Saw a few of those when I was in Paris last week, being carried by the latest roulement on Op Sentinel, didn't seem to be as many though as the CRS and well armed Gendarmerie seemed to be wandering the streets more than the Army, although when I tipped up at L'Arc De Triomphe for the rekindling ceremony, there were a few squaddies around.
 
Saw a few of those when I was in Paris last week, being carried by the latest roulement on Op Sentinel, didn't seem to be as many though as the CRS and well armed Gendarmerie seemed to be wandering the streets more than the Army, although when I tipped up at L'Arc De Triomphe for the rekindling ceremony, there were a few squaddies around.
It is a very good if somewhat expensive rifle, for what is effectively a well engineered, piston, M4. The civvy version, the MR556A1, cost's around $2800 a piece, compare that to similar SIG516 for $1200, and any number of made for Bubba Specials for $600.
 
.......................

Edited to add - after a quick google searchthe bottom right two-pistol grip weapon was a 90's prototype for a personal defence weapon by GIAT industries. The fifty round "banana magazine" on the FAMAS appears to have been a manufactiurer's flight of fancy and was never adopted.
This side of the pond Surefire produced it's high capacity magazines, whilst they do have an application in MINIMI style section weapons that accept STANAG magazines all I have heard from soldiers is whinges about the weight and bulk. Magpul, I believe, made a 40 round mag that I see for sale at gun events, still in the new, original, intended for the military wrapper.......so I don't think they caught on either.
 
I saw this story about a Swiss of Syrian ethnicity who it being tried for fighting against ISIS, as Swiss neutrality laws forbid service in any foreign military.
Swiss soldier on trial for fighting IS

It reminded me of stories I had read and seen on TV when I lived in Switzerland, of Swiss nationals who had to hide their service in the FFL and of former legionnaires associations where anonymity was preserved. Seems a bit paradoxical in this day and age, but the laws were put in place for good reason.
 
Does the FAMAS have a bolt and bolt carrier assembly as per SA80?
Ever heard of Google?
1550753864542.png


The following video explains the delayed blow-back action quite well, but unfortunately does not go into the full field strip for daily maintenance.

This is a good video (unbiased US gun review):
 
I saw this story about a Swiss of Syrian ethnicity who it being tried for fighting against ISIS, as Swiss neutrality laws forbid service in any foreign military.
Swiss soldier on trial for fighting IS

It reminded me of stories I had read and seen on TV when I lived in Switzerland, of Swiss nationals who had to hide their service in the FFL and of former legionnaires associations where anonymity was preserved. Seems a bit paradoxical in this day and age, but the laws were put in place for good reason.
There have always been some real Swiss (as opposed to Frenchmen officially masquerading as Swiss) in the Legion. The two I knew personally were good blokes.
 
Ever heard of Google?
View attachment 378980

The following video explains the delayed blow-back action quite well, but unfortunately does not go into the full field strip for daily maintenance.

This is a good video (unbiased US gun review):
Google?
As FAMAS is ambidextrous, I am curious as to how the working parts assemble.How do you ensure that empy cases will be ejected through the correct side of the weapon?
 
Google? As FAMAS is ambidextrous, I am curious as to how the working parts assemble.How do you ensure that empy cases will be ejected through the correct side of the weapon?
Use the Google foo! :)
The FAMAS is not completely ambidextrous, but each rifle can easily be configured/reconfigured for left or right hand shooting in a very short time by an experienced user. This entails field stripping of the weapon, removal of the bolt from the bolt carrier, disassembly of the bolt head and switching the extractor to the opposite side of the bolt head and replacing the plug in the other side.

As per https://www.forgottenweapons.com/wp-content/uploads/manuals/FAMAS F1 manual English.pdf
(Sections 6.1.6 and 6.1.9)
 
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Use the Google foo! :)
The FAMAS is not completely ambidextrous, but each rifle can easily be configured/reconfigured for left or right hand shooting in a very short time by an experienced user. This entails field stripping of the weapon, removal of the bolt from the bolt carrier, disassembly of the bolt head and switching the extractor to the opposite side of the bolt head and replacing the plug in the other side.

As per https://www.forgottenweapons.com/wp-content/uploads/manuals/FAMAS F1 manual English.pdf
(Sectiosn 6.1.6 and 6.1.9)
Wiki is for the weak.;)
That is sort of what I was expecting. So it is a user job as opposed to an armourer's job. How long would it take to complete the conversion?
But the FAMAS is now in the process of being replaced by the HK416 across all of the French armed forces.

Foreign Legion: Units to receive HK 416 F | French Foreign Legion Information

An M4 with a gas system similar to that in an SA80?
 
........... That is sort of what I was expecting. So it is a user job as opposed to an armourer's job. How long would it take to complete the conversion? ...........
You can do it in the field in under a couple of minutes, but the small parts in the bolt head are rather finicky, so you wouldn't want to be doing it at night in a rainstorm ;-).
 
I saw this story about a Swiss of Syrian ethnicity who it being tried for fighting against ISIS, as Swiss neutrality laws forbid service in any foreign military.
Swiss soldier on trial for fighting IS

It reminded me of stories I had read and seen on TV when I lived in Switzerland, of Swiss nationals who had to hide their service in the FFL and of former legionnaires associations where anonymity was preserved. Seems a bit paradoxical in this day and age, but the laws were put in place for good reason.
I have met a few Swiss military and reservists when parachuting. Nice blokes but, they seem to get a bit miffed at the limited amount of interesting things to do unless you are in one of a couple of speshul units. The one's I met had gone to Holland to do the Dutch Walty wings* course as there is the same chance of doing a para course in Switzerland as there is of a snowball surviving in hell. Once they have the Dutch static wing qualification stamped into their logbook then they try and harass the boxheads to get onto the German wings course. The Germans regularly run 5 day friendship jump courses in the LL/LTS, Altenstadt, Bavaria, training and 5 jumps over 5 days with many learned discussions assisted by liquid refreshment - its the tradition of everyone slapping you on the arrse when you qualify that is questionable.

Note: * There is also an Italian Walty wings course.
 
I have met a few Swiss military and reservists when parachuting. Nice blokes but, they seem to get a bit miffed at the limited amount of interesting things to do unless you are in one of a couple of speshul units. The one's I met had gone to Holland to do the Dutch Walty wings* course as there is the same chance of doing a para course in Switzerland as there is of a snowball surviving in hell. Once they have the Dutch static wing qualification stamped into their logbook then they try and harass the boxheads to get onto the German wings course. The Germans regularly run 5 day friendship jump courses in the LL/LTS, Altenstadt, Bavaria, training and 5 jumps over 5 days with many learned discussions assisted by liquid refreshment - its the tradition of everyone slapping you on the arrse when you qualify that is questionable.

Note: * There is also an Italian Walty wings course.
Thank all your gods and deities that you haven't passed through Hammelburg: there you get to have a night time torch light ceremony in front of a BFO stone.

Very Third Reich.
 
I have met a few Swiss military and reservists when parachuting. Nice blokes but, they seem to get a bit miffed at the limited amount of interesting things to do unless you are in one of a couple of speshul units. The one's I met had gone to Holland to do the Dutch Walty wings* course as there is the same chance of doing a para course in Switzerland as there is of a snowball surviving in hell. Once they have the Dutch static wing qualification stamped into their logbook then they try and harass the boxheads to get onto the German wings course. The Germans regularly run 5 day friendship jump courses in the LL/LTS, Altenstadt, Bavaria, training and 5 jumps over 5 days with many learned discussions assisted by liquid refreshment - its the tradition of everyone slapping you on the arrse when you qualify that is questionable.

Note: * There is also an Italian Walty wings course.
Arrse slapping being a particularly Bavarian peccadillo. Do they make you wear leather shorts as well?

Two of my Swiss mates were in speshul units. One was in a mountain troop (no idea what it was called) and had some hair-raising stories, including one where the guy next to him got swept away as the schneebrett he was on let loose. The other didn't talk about what he did, but I remember him getting pissed off when he changed jobs and went to work for Swisscom - they immediately transferred him into a unit designated to guard telephone exchanges.
 
Liberally translated from the official 2 REP facebook page:

2 REP's Third Company is on a short rotational tour in support of RIMaP/NC "Régiment d’Infanterie de Marine du Pacifique, Nouvelle Calédonie" - The Marine Infantry Regiment of the Pacific, New Caledonia base (another part of this regiment is based in French Polynesia).

It undertook an airborne exercise on the Deva training area where the topographical features and vegetation make it an ideal infantry combat training ground being both physically and tactically demanding. After a night insertion by parachute, the Legionnaires enabled a subsequent daytime helicopter insertion by French regular engineer unit.

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All pictures from 2 REP facebook page
 
Arrse slapping being a particularly Bavarian peccadillo. Do they make you wear leather shorts as well?

Two of my Swiss mates were in speshul units. One was in a mountain troop (no idea what it was called) and had some hair-raising stories, including one where the guy next to him got swept away as the schneebrett he was on let loose. The other didn't talk about what he did, but I remember him getting pissed off when he changed jobs and went to work for Swisscom - they immediately transferred him into a unit designated to guard telephone exchanges.
Possibly Pigeon Handler 1st class?
 

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