How does the 2 REP (FFL) compare to the British Paras?

Not the Legion but, a quick FYI on one of the French THEM units. RPIMA traces it's roots back to being the French Squadron in the WW2 SAS and has recently undergone a change of headwear to again reflect this.

They have swapped out their reddish colour beret and RPIMA insignia for a maroon beret and the winged dagger insignia. The who dares wins motto displayed in french "Qui Ose Gagne" and of course in true French style the cap badge is worn over the right eye.

Old style on top, newer style on the bottom.



Photo credit goes to my mate JPW "The Doc".
Yes - apparently since April 2017.
The Regimental insignia (which is not worn on the beret) remains as it used to be:

Again, it shows their origin as part of the WW2 SAS. As does the Regimental insignia of 2 RPIMa:

Which is not part of the French SF and retains the beret and cap badge previously also worn by 1 RPIMa.
 
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Hopefully this will lead to the Legion Paras also getting a cap badge reflecting their uniqueness and not just duplicating the ringed "dextrochere" - winged hand holding a sword worn by all "Metropolitan Paras" As the former Colonial Paras which are the RPIMa's have the dextrochere entwined with an anchor, it has long been mooted that 2 REP should have the dextrochere entwined with a Legion grenade and flame:
 
2 REP training with 2 PARA again (from facebook):
16 Air Assault Brigade is at Salisbury Plain.
16 July at 07:26 · Warminster ·

"If we go out on a mission anywhere in the world, I believe 2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment and 2e REP - 2ème Régiment étranger de parachutistes would be able to function very easily, because we have the same mentality and the same way of working."
British and French paratroopers have shared best practice and bonded during joint machine gun training, building our combat readiness together.

Anglo-French machine gun training
 
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2 REP Regimental Colours on parade in Calvi town on the occasion of Bastille Day:



 
Not 2 REP but 2 REI. Yesterday was the "passasation de commandement" ceremony in Nîmes when the outgoing CO hands over to the incoming CO. COMLE was there and at least 2 recent former COs. If you can access the pics then scroll through. You can spot the mascot, the Musique de la LE and see some of the traditions that are upheld. Typical Nîmois bright blue sky. Other half was on parade with les anciens. It's always a great ceremony. Followed by Kro and vin de Puyloubier!

https://www.facebook.com/pg/2eREIofficiel/photos/?tab=album&album_id=2086262221445296


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Noticed this on France24.com while looking at something unrelated:

"Shrouded in mystery, the French Foreign Legion has cultivated a reputation for being as feared by its enemies as it is envied by its allies. The Legionnaires come from across the world to serve a country that is not their own. Far from home, they are told the Legion is their homeland. Who are these soldiers and what motivates them to serve in the French Army?

France 24 reporters, Claire Paccalin and Fanny Allard, spoke to Legionnaires from the 13th DBLE at their barracks in France and in Mali where they are part of Operation Barkhane, France’s counter-extremism operation in the Sahel.

Scroll down for the full report, extra interview footage, a Legionnaire’s French lesson and tips for filming in the desert."

There are eight videos, in English and French with English subtitles.
An embedded player will pop up when you choose to watch one. From there you can scroll to the next one.

Reporter Claire Paccalin was embedded with them. She is tall, leggy and has quite a walk...

The Foreign Legion: another French exception
 
Noticed this on France24.com while looking at something unrelated:

"Shrouded in mystery, the French Foreign Legion has cultivated a reputation for being as feared by its enemies as it is envied by its allies. The Legionnaires come from across the world to serve a country that is not their own. Far from home, they are told the Legion is their homeland. Who are these soldiers and what motivates them to serve in the French Army?

France 24 reporters, Claire Paccalin and Fanny Allard, spoke to Legionnaires from the 13th DBLE at their barracks in France and in Mali where they are part of Operation Barkhane, France’s counter-extremism operation in the Sahel.

Scroll down for the full report, extra interview footage, a Legionnaire’s French lesson and tips for filming in the desert."

There are eight videos, in English and French with English subtitles.
An embedded player will pop up when you choose to watch one. From there you can scroll to the next one.

Reporter Claire Paccalin was embedded with them. She is tall, leggy and has quite a walk...

The Foreign Legion: another French exception
Thanks for that. One of the better insights.
I think it's funny though, the "surrounded in mystery" aspect. The FFL seems one of the most media heavy units on YouTube and elsewhere. Seems fairly understandable these days what the enlistment/training process is like, the culture and expectations.
 
From a Legion blog on the interweb: View attachment 341541 A 2 REP Adjudant Chef's civil wedding ceremony at the Calvi Mayor's Office. His bride apparently also works at the regiment and both do voluntary work for the local branch of the French equivalent of the RNLI - hence all the chaps in orange in the background. Of interest is the Adjudant-Chef Major (normally just called Major - the British equivalent rank of "Major" in the French Army is known as "Commandant") sitting on the far left. He would be the most senior non-commissioned officer in the regiment and usually commissioned later. Note the prominent tattoos.
Your comment about the "Major" is a bit out of date. When I was a young Légionnaire, in the early 80s, your comment would be true. They also had to pass a "concours" to become a Major. We had one Major in our Régiment and saw him so infrequently that, when we did see him we had trouble remembering how to address him! The concours has been scrapped and Major is just another rank on the ladder now. There are lots of them these days. Funnily enough, even with all of those Majors around, the Président of the SNCOs is always an Adjudant Chef which is, as you know, is one rank lower than MAJOR.
 
Your comment about the "Major" is a bit out of date. When I was a young Légionnaire, in the early 80s, your comment would be true. They also had to pass a "concours" to become a Major. We had one Major in our Régiment and saw him so infrequently that, when we did see him we had trouble remembering how to address him! The concours has been scrapped and Major is just another rank on the ladder now. There are lots of them these days. Funnily enough, even with all of those Majors around, the Président of the SNCOs is always an Adjudant Chef which is, as you know, is one rank lower than MAJOR.
So is the rank of Major a sort of honorarium for a deserving long-standing Adjudant-Chef? Or do you have to attain Major to be commissioned later?
 
It's just another rank now. Even the Corps des Majors no longer exists and a Major is now considered to be a Sous-officier. You can become Major after three years as an ACH.
 
It's just another rank now. Even the Corps des Majors no longer exists and a Major is now considered to be a Sous-officier. You can become Major after three years as an ACH.
So something like an Adjudant-Chef de Premiere Classe :) like the Caporal-Chef de Premiere Classe which was recently brouht in in the French Army.
 
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Looks like a bright idea to use the trip-flare brackets to hold the spare GPMG barrel. During my GPMG(SF) course we would just lie the barrel on the ground next to the gun. On one occasion the training wing WO was supervising our gun and when we changed the barrel I dropped it onto his boots, he didn’t notice until his feet started to get a bit hot!
 
What with the proposed small arms changes at infantry section/platoon level in the British Army; I wonder if there will be any tactical lessons learned / cross-pollination going on between Para Regt and 2 REP?
 
Is there a new insignia for this rank? I assume a black kepi is worn as well.

Cheers,
Dan.
I don't think the Legion have adopted the rank of C/C de 1cl, but if they have it would be a Black Kepi. A currently serving member should answer on that score.

As regards the French regulars:


Several points to note:
What in the UK we would call JNCOs are grouped with privates in the category "militaires de rang" or "rankers".
Rankers base chevron colours depend on branch of service - in the Legion they are green.
The thin stripe/chevron overlaying the others is a throwback to conscription, when it was worn to denote a contracted professional soldier as opposed to a conscripted one. As the Legion never had conscripted soldiers it never used this thin chevron and still does not.
The highest rank a conscript could achieve was "Sergent". This was denoted by one thick gold (or silver) chevron. As conscription has ended this rank badge is no longer in use. As the Legion never had conscripted soldiers it never used this rank badge.
What we would call SNCOs are called "sous officiers" or "under officers". A "Sergent" in the French Army (Infantry Branch) commands a "Groupe" (British - Section, US - Squad) in the field. Thus would be equivalent to a British Army Corporal. But in garrison a French "Sergent" also carries out duties equivalent to a British Army Sergeant (excellent as regards to the duty roster as there are many more "Sergents" in a French unit than there are Sergeants in a British unit).
"Adjudant" and above are "sous-officiers superieurs" the equivalent of UK Warrant Officers.
The gold or silver rank badge colouring is interchangeable. Cavalry and Gendarmerie use base silver. All other branches use base gold. The most confusing aspect is that for the Cavalry the "Adjudant" and "Adjudant-Chef" rank badges are swapped around.
An "Aspirant" is essentially an aspiring Officer. Sometimes you see "Aspirants" in the Legion as attached (very) junior medical officers.
As regards General Officer ranks, the French appear to have pulled a fast one; as what in NATO parlance is a "one-star" officer in the French Army wears two stars and at every level they wear an extra star apart from "Marechal" where it is two extra stars.
 

Calvi and 2 REP
 
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Florence Parly the French Minister of Defence, recently visited 2 REP on Op Barkhane in Niger, where they are providing the greater part of the "Altor" Battle-Group.





And some touchy-feely hearts and minds stuff:
 
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2 REP Sniper Training on Caylus Training Area and Ranges:
 

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