How does the 2 REP (FFL) compare to the British Paras?

Agreed - very much miss his worldview of the Sahel & Mali BTW thanks for a stack of posts to catch up on - great stuff!
@Condottiere, I echo the thanks. Not enough 'likes' for all your posts. Cheers, Dan.
I try to catch up on my posts when I can. Friday-Saturday is the weekend here and seeing as the rest of the world has Sat-Sun off, Saturday can be less demanding, especially if all is calm. Add to that, it is the Holy Month of Ramadan - when on the local side everything slows down . So it all combined with a decent internet connection and I could do some research and posts. Currently eating a late lunch consisting of an eighth of a mahoosive water melon straight from the fridge. As the weather outside is in the mid-forties C, the melon is rather nice.
 
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Nice pic of 2 REP legionnaires on Op Sentinelle recently:


This one is a bit dated (2017), but is a good shot of the militarised Toyota Land Cruiser supplied to the French Army by MassTech:

(Op Vigipirate was the precursor to Op Sentinelle.)
 
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Not sure what to say, Sahel is interesting, extremely hot, Op Barkhane seems to be very fluid with the national borders, I’ve operated in 2 countries. The enemy are small in number but intelligent and opportunistic. No one tells me anything, and many people are demotivated and counting down the days to the depart.
 
From a Legion blog on the interweb:
Registry wedding of a 2 REP Adjudant Chef in June 2018.jpg
A 2 REP Adjudant Chef's civil wedding ceremony at the Calvi Mayor's Office. His bride apparently also works at the regiment and both do voluntary work for the local branch of the French equivalent of the RNLI - hence all the chaps in orange in the background. Of interest is the Adjudant-Chef Major (normally just called Major - the British equivalent rank of "Major" in the French Army is known as "Commandant") sitting on the far left. He would be the most senior non-commissioned officer in the regiment and usually commissioned later. Note the prominent tattoos.
 
The Adjudant Chef looks like he`s about to rip the registrar`s head off , (he also looks like pulling heads off bodies is a past time of his) :)
 
Apologies if this has been covered before but I was wondering how re-enlistment works?
Once the initial 5 year contract has been completed are subsequent contracts also in 5 year blocks or are other lengths of contract available?
Additionally, is it necessary to have reached a certain rank or specialisation by a certain point in order to extend one's service?

Thanks,

F-M
 
An official leaflet about the current state of the French Army, released in advanceof the 14th July Parade on the Champs Elysee. In French, but a lot of the gist can be worked out even if you don't know the language.
https://www.asafrance.fr/images/dp-armee-de-terre-2018.pdf

Points to note:
Legionnaires on the front cover.
On page six the text gives effective strength figures of 98,000 regular troops and 19,000 volunteer reservists and that in 2017, about 20,000 troops had been deployed on operations internally and externally or on overseas tasks. Of the 98,000 regular troops, the operationally deployable component is 77,000. (Note: current Legion strength is 8,900 so even if admin and training personnel are discounted, over ten per cent of French Army deployable strength is comprised of Foreign Legionnaires)
Up to date orbat of the French Army on pages eight and nine.
Up to date worldwide deployments of the French Army on pages ten and eleven.
Personnel breakdown of the French Army on pages twelve and thirteen - note ten per cent are female. (Note: no females in the Legion).
On pages sixteen to twenty-one details on current and programmed equipment issue for the French Army.
Page twenty-five is a list of units taking part in the 14 July parade. As well as the usual annual presence of the Foreign Legion Band and Pioneer Platoon (the chaps with the axes and leather aprons), 2 REI will be parading on foot and 2 REG will be parading in vehicles.
Pages thirty and thirty-one pay hommage to the French Army troops killed on duty since 14 July 2017. This includes two Legionnaires.
 
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Apologies if this has been covered before but I was wondering how re-enlistment works?
Once the initial 5 year contract has been completed are subsequent contracts also in 5 year blocks or are other lengths of contract available?
Additionally, is it necessary to have reached a certain rank or specialisation by a certain point in order to extend one's service?

Thanks,

F-M
Re-enlistment can be in incremental contracts from a minimum of six months to a maximum of five years.

Re-enlistment not only depends on whether the individual wants to stay, but also on whether the Legion wants/needs to keep him.

A contract renewal is less likely unless the rank of "caporal" or a specialisation has been achieved in the first five years. Future prospects are also taken into account as well as maintenance of fitness levels and disciplinary issues.

There is a constant stream of young and willing fresh recruits to fill the rank and file so there is no pressure to retain individuals who are considered not worthwhile.
 
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From a Legion blog on the interweb: View attachment 341541 A 2 REP Adjudant Chef's civil wedding ceremony at the Calvi Mayor's Office. His bride apparently also works at the regiment and both do voluntary work for the local branch of the French equivalent of the RNLI - hence all the chaps in orange in the background. Of interest is the Adjudant-Chef Major (normally just called Major - the British equivalent rank of "Major" in the French Army is known as "Commandant") sitting on the far left. He would be the most senior non-commissioned officer in the regiment and usually commissioned later. Note the prominent tattoos.
It looks like an inquest ?
 
Re-enlistment can be in incremental contracts from a minimum of six months to a maximum of five years.

Re-enlistment not only depends on whether the individual wants to stay, but also on whether the Legion wants/needs to keep you.

A contract renewal is less likely unless the rank of "caporal" or a specialisation has been achieved in the first five years. Future prospects are also taken into account as well as maintenance of fitness levels and disciplinary issues.

There is a constant stream of youn and willing fresh recruits so there is no pressure to retain individuals who are considered as potentially risky propositions.
@ Condottiere, thanks for the clarification. Am I right in thinking that a pension is payable after 15 years service?
 
@ Condottiere, thanks for the clarification. Am I right in thinking that a pension is payable after 15 years service?
That used to be the case - although there was a minimum age limit for it to be paid out, thirty-five I believe.
I am led to believe that currently it is payable after eighteen years service.
Pensions can be generous and are individually calculated on a points system, which takes into account many other factors as well as length of service, these include being a paratrooper (number of jumps made), being a diver, deploying on operations, being decorated, being wounded, etc.
 
That used to be the case - although there was a minimum age limit for it to be paid out, thirty-five I believe.
I am led to believe that currently it is payable after eighteen years service.
Pensions can be generous and are individually calculated on a points system, which takes into account many other factors as well as length of service, these include being a paratrooper (number of jumps made), being a diver, deploying on operations, being decorated, being wounded, etc.
Thanks again.
 
From a very recent local French newspaper edition in Metz commenting on a mobile Foreign Legion recruiting truck out of the recruiting office in Strasbourg:
Amnéville : en quête de 1 100 légionnaires
1531669747007.png


The article is interesting as it mentions that the Legion has not yet achieved its recently augmented mandated strength (which was said to have been 8,900). But in the article it quotes the Adjudant-Chef (UK WO1 equivalent) in charge of the recruiting team stating that the Legion is currently 8,200 strong and needs an uplift of 1,100 extra personnel. This appears to indicate that Legion numbers are now mandated at 9,300. This is the highest level since the end of the Algerian War and the withdrawal of the Legion from Algeria in the early to mid-sixties.

Recruitment criteria are stated as the following:
To be male between the ages of 17 and 40 and physically apt.
To be able to prove one's identity.
To be able to complete the obligatory medical, physical and psycho-technical selection tests.
To be able to read and write in one's own language.
To be motivated.
But no minimum educational attainment level is required.
On average one out of eight volunteers is accepted.

The advantages of becoming a Legionnaire are listed as:
Over 150 nationalities are represented in the Legion.
A Legionnaire can request French nationality after three years service and can keep his foreign nationality.
A Legionnaire can keep his Legion name at the end of his initial five year contract.
The starting basic net monthly salary is 1,280€. Extra pay is added dependent on activity carried out etc.
The Foreign Legion is comprised of Cavalry, Engineers, Infantry and Paratroops, trained by and in the Legion.
It forms its own family within the (French) Army. It represents a second chance for men of 17-40 years to integrate themselves into this family providing they respect its values, which are discipline, cohesion, solidarity, mutual help, selflessness, fraternity and combativeness.

According to Adjudant-Chef Gheorgh Gredjuc, the definition of the perfect Legionnaire is someone who is respectful, proud, physically fit and elegant and who serves France with honour and fidelity at the risk of his own life.
 
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Not the Legion but, a quick FYI on one of the French THEM units. RPIMA traces it's roots back to being the French Squadron in the WW2 SAS and has recently undergone a change of headwear to again reflect this.

They have swapped out their reddish colour beret and RPIMA insignia for a maroon beret and the winged dagger insignia. The who dares wins motto displayed in french "Qui Ose Gagne" and of course in true French style the cap badge is worn over the right eye.

Old style on top, newer style on the bottom.



Photo credit goes to my mate JPW "The Doc".
 

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