How do I fix too much tomato paste in a recipe?

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
Wot 'E said.
I think we've all made the mistake of too much tomato sauce.

Whatever you do in the future, read the recipe carefully.. I'm numerically dyslexic.. A recipe said 3-4 cloves... I put in 34.

Unless you are a vampire there is no such thing as too much garlic
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
It is.. But if you mention Dyscalculia to most people you get a reaction of "WTF is that"

Is that the opposite of the count in sesame street?
 
For Bolognese sauce I use Passata, but then I whizz together half a dozen fresh tomatoes and a bit of garlic together in the blender. I add this as needed, any leftover goes in the freezer.
 
Unless you are a vampire there is no such thing as too much garlic
It wasn't Cloves of Garlic.. Just CLOVES. The little black things that look like a spikey thing.
Turned EVERYTHING Purple and the house smelt like a dentists.... Hang on, Purple. The bastards had me and I hadn't even realised it.

Well played your Eminence, well played.
 
It's on a very slow simmer at the moment, I'll give it a taste in 20 mins and see how it's going. From this thread I understand that I should add more of any included liquids that don't taste of tomato. I'll try not to drink all the wine first...
You might try a bit of sugar if it's too tart - I'd not get overly excited about the recipe unless you're doing a classic and feel you need to be authentic. A classic ragu has no garlic for instance. Nor chili, both of which go in mine.

If you're a beginner, it tastes alright and you're not looking to get in anyone's knickers say feck it, dilute and then dunk some crusty bread in to soak some up and crack on. This is how you learn.
 

Whining Civvy

War Hero
Yes, that reduces any acidity. The other problem might be the thickness of the sauce caused by the paste. Easily remedied by adding a little water. The excess sauce can be ladled or sieved off for use at another time.

I've never found too much tomato paste to be up there in the pantheon of culinary disasters, really. It's something very forgiving. Did the OP accidentally tip in a bucketful of it?

"That looks about right".

Took half the sauce out, added water, then a touch of stock, then a bit of wine, it's more or less palatable now. Not my finest work but it's edible and I don't have to chuck it out so let's call it a win.
 

Whining Civvy

War Hero
You might try a bit of sugar if it's too tart - I'd not get overly excited about the recipe unless you're doing a classic and feel you need to be authentic. A classic ragu has no garlic for instance. Nor chili, both of which go in mine.

If you're a beginner, it tastes alright and you're not looking to get in anyone's knickers say feck it, dilute and then dunk some crusty bread in to soak some up and crack on. This is how you learn.
Yeah sugar was going to be the next bit to add if the other efforts didn't fix it up. I thought I'd stop my repairs at the point where it was kind of ok I guess instead of trying that one more thing and risking fcuking it up entirely.

As I understand it, if there's too much then pull out half of the sauce and rebalance the flavours with other ingredients. That will go in the memory box. Cheers for your help.
 
You might try a bit of sugar if it's too tart - I'd not get overly excited about the recipe unless you're doing a classic and feel you need to be authentic. A classic ragu has no garlic for instance. Nor chili, both of which go in mine.

If you're a beginner, it tastes alright and you're not looking to get in anyone's knickers say feck it, dilute and then dunk some crusty bread in to soak some up and crack on. This is how you learn.

As with most Italian and other Mediterranean recipes, if you ask 100,000 cooks, you'll get 100,000 different versions claiming to be the authentic and definitive version. Just look on your own as being number 100,001.
 
Yeah sugar was going to be the next bit to add if the other efforts didn't fix it up. I thought I'd stop my repairs at the point where it was kind of ok I guess instead of trying that one more thing and risking fcuking it up entirely.

As I understand it, if there's too much then pull out half of the sauce and rebalance the flavours with other ingredients. That will go in the memory box. Cheers for your help.
Sauces take practice, for ragu I always used Carluccio's which I got from his 'Passion for Pasta' way back...then I decided I like garlic and/or chili in it. Some cracking recipes in it.
 
As with most Italian and other Mediterranean recipes, if you ask 100,000 cooks, you'll get 100,000 different versions claiming to be the authentic and definitive version. Just look on your own as being number 100,001.
Nope. Classic ragu is as Carluccio gives it - it's like people on here insisting paella has chorizo in it - go to Valencia and tell them.

Which doesn't stop you making something as you like it - as I said I do.
 
Sauces take practice, for ragu I always used Carluccio's which I got from his 'Passion for Pasta' way back...then I decided I like garlic and/or chili in it. Some cracking recipes in it.
Something that I have found is that recipes and sauces things that have been accepted as traditional Italian staples do not actually exist in Italy or, at least, are something considerably different. I suspect that many of these may be Italian/American recipes rather than Italian.
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
try the Keith Floyd fix
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drink wine until you don't care what the food tastes like
 
Nope. Classic ragu is as Carluccio gives it - it's like people on here insisting paella has chorizo in it - go to Valencia and tell them.

Which doesn't stop you making something as you like it - as I said I do.

Do you think that (domestic) Italian cooks do not adopt that policy? Unless a sauce or recipe can be sourced to a single chef there is rarely a single definitive version. There will just be several definitive versions.
 
It wasn't Cloves of Garlic.. Just CLOVES. The little black things that look like a spikey thing.
Turned EVERYTHING Purple and the house smelt like a dentists.... Hang on, Purple. The bastards had me and I hadn't even realised it.

Well played your Eminence, well played.
Am I the only one here then, who sucks on dried cloves
 
Something that I have found is that recipes and sauces things that have been accepted as traditional Italian staples do not actually exist in Italy or, at least, are something considerably different. I suspect that many of these may be Italian/American recipes rather than Italian.
A classic ragu Bologneses does, with regional variations. One of the best meals I've eaten had a hare ragu as the primi - lush as feck. The company had fecked up and had to book us into one of the most expensive hotels in Milan.
 
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