How can the government get Brexit over the line?

Firstly, apologies for staring another Brexit thread.

Mods: I have tried to be specific about the questions raised. If you think they are too generic, feel free to delete.

The purpose of this thread is to seek the informed views of Arrsers about three questions:

1. How can the government get Brexit over the line? (that is, by what methods?); [there was some speculation that HMG might now not defend Robin Tillbrook's court case, which is that we left on 29/03/2019];

2. Is there any way at all in which HMG can say either 'We're already out'; or just declare that we have left?; and,

3. Can HMG get a no deal past Parliament? Can it get even a deal past the Remainers?

I ask these questions outside of the estimable @Auld-Yin 's thread because it is still stuck in a 'should we leave/yes we should/no we shouldn't' cycle.
What concerns me is the technical/procedural aspect - how is Brexit achieved from this point onwards?
 
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Auld-Yin

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:cool:
 
Firstly, apologies for staring another Brexit thread.

Mods: I have tried to be specific about the questions raised. If you think this is too generic, feel free to delete.

The purpose of this thread is to seek the informed views of Arrsers about three questions:
There's your first mistake.
 
Firstly, apologies for staring another Brexit thread.

Mods: I have tried to be specific about the questions raised. If you think this is too generic, feel free to delete.

The purpose of this thread is to seek the informed views of Arrsers about three questions:

1. How can the government get Brexit over the line? (that is, by what methods?); [there was some speculation that HMG might now concede that Robin Tillbrook's court case, which is that we left on 29/03/2019, is correct];

2. Is there any way at all in which HMG can say either 'We're already out'; or just declare that we have left?; and,

3. Can HMG get a no deal past Parliament? Can it get even a deal past the Remainers?

I ask these questions outside of the estimable @Auld-Yin 's thread because it is still stuck in a 'should we leave/yes we should/no we shouldn't' cycle. What genuinely concerns me now is: is Brexit dead? Can we actually find a way to get this over the line? That is, the technical aspect - how is Brexit achieved from this point onwards?
If 1) is correct, then 2) is inherent and 3) is irrelevant.
 
1: The PM is the only respondent required in the Tilbrook case. The case quite clearly states the PM and not a named individual can respond and agree. If he does then that is admitting that the previous PM had asked for an extension illegally. On a technicality she did. She asked for the extension first and then put her SI in place when in fact she should have put it the other way round.

2: Again, it is the PM who has the capacity to declare "we are already out" and not the Government or Parliament. Parliament has already agreed to a leaving date with A50. The extensions were there to try to secure us to the EU so the PM can declare that there is no point in further negotiations as the EU will not budge from the WA. Ergo no point carrying on.

3: The default is leave on the 31st. Whether a deal has been struck or not, All the PM has to do is sit tight until the 1st November and no extension requested, only the PM can request one just as May did, and we will be out.

You may note that in all the answers above it is the PM who has control and by the looks of it Boris isn't going to drop the reins.
 
I believe that we are nearly at the point now where Boris can just, in the American parlance, take a knee and run down the clock.

We leave on 31st October by automatic function of law, unless there's an extension agreed by the EU

(Westminster) Parliament can't force Boris to change that - they cant force the EU to extend, and at the moment they won't vote for the deal thats been offered

So ultimately, we are here:


But this time wearing a suicide vest. If we go no deal then the Irish economy is utterly, utterly, fucked - I don't believe that the EU will let that happen, so they will ultimately have no option but to drop the backstop and make a deal.
 
“we will not create a hard border between the north of Ireland and the Irish republic, if the EU want to build one that’s up to them, but it won’t last long - it will be blown up!”

 
1: The PM is the only respondent required in the Tilbrook case. The case quite clearly states the PM and not a named individual can respond and agree. If he does then that is admitting that the previous PM had asked for an extension illegally. On a technicality she did. She asked for the extension first and then put her SI in place when in fact she should have put it the other way round.

2: Again, it is the PM who has the capacity to declare "we are already out" and not the Government or Parliament. Parliament has already agreed to a leaving date with A50. The extensions were there to try to secure us to the EU so the PM can declare that there is no point in further negotiations as the EU will not budge from the WA. Ergo no point carrying on.

3: The default is leave on the 31st. Whether a deal has been struck or not, All the PM has to do is sit tight until the 1st November and no extension requested, only the PM can request one just as May did, and we will be out.

You may note that in all the answers above it is the PM who has control and by the looks of it Boris isn't going to drop the reins.
Thank you. How would that change if, before 01/11, Boris was not the PM? There was talk in yesterday's Telegraph of there being up to 40 Tories ready to oppose the PM in a vote of no confidence. Does the PM have to face such a vote?
 
Selective assassination.

Ken Clarke has a convenient "fatal heart attack" and the dissenting Tory MPs get the message to wind their necks in.

As the late Johnny Speight said, "you wont get democracy in this country until you start shooting people."
 

RP578

LE
Book Reviewer
If he does then that is admitting that the previous PM had asked for an extension illegally. On a technicality she did. She asked for the extension first and then put her SI in place when in fact she should have put it the other way round.
Would you mind expanding on that?
 
Thank you. How would that change if, before 01/11, Boris was not the PM? There was talk in yesterday's Telegraph of there being up to 40 Tories ready to oppose the PM in a vote of no confidence. Does the PM have to face such a vote?
If a vote of no confidence is passed (66% of house or greater required) then Boris has 14 days to get a vote of confidence from the house. If he can't get a vote of confidence he can either ignore it and carry on, as he has the majority in the house, or he calls for a GE. He then goes to the Queen to ask for permission to dissolve Parliament, the Queen says yes and Boris then declares the date for a GE. Boris will set the date for after the 31st so in reality this isn't a good option for the remain camp.
 

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