How can our chubby, drug-addled and right-on Army protect us from our enemies?

#41
People were complaining about the state of soldier fitness when I joined in 98. Yet the guys who joined then and after were still able to do the business on the ground in Iraq etc.

If things have radically changed, perhaps it's the introduction of PAYD? I saw a video of an infantry lad showing off his single person room and he showed off his "kitchen" in his room (which seemed to comprise of a microwave and a kettle). It looked like he existed on packets of super noodles.
 
#42
COLONEL TIM COLLINS: How can our chubby, drug-addled and right-on Army protect us from our enemies? | Daily Mail Online

No paywall to bar anyone from reading. Good Daily Mail (or Mail on Sunday) fodder for the outraged classes before Church and a sermon on 'Life is a Cheeseburger' or whatever.

This part is more worrying than much of the rest, in my opinion:


- Which followed on from the Executive Summary:


We continue to dribble on about 'leadership' and 'management' in these columns, but tend (+/-) to miss the very highest elements of the strategic level; those which shape the actual requirement for a defence capability of any sort. Given the weird state of HMF over the past few years, the 'lawfare' treatment of soldiers (but oddly, not the more senior officers), the vast indefensible aircraft carriers, the ludicrous prioritising of identity politics within the ranks etc, I sometimes feel that the whole area of defence is too important for politicians to handle; someone else could surely do a better job. We need a Tsar.
There is one partiicular Tory MP girding up his loins as we type...Or not if his furious back peddling on twitter is to be believed
 
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#43
I have always said that the British showed their cards with Iraq, it was the only army involved in Iraq or Afghanistan that left with its reputation in complete tatters, even the likes of Latvia left with some credit...its really a lesson in the power of Mystery.
The down hill started in Aden, 1967, 22 men dead and no action taken against the killers,
there after no decent kit, shit officers at the top, we are not at the bottom yet IMHO
 
#44
I have always said that the British showed their cards with Iraq, it was the only army involved in Iraq or Afghanistan that left with its reputation in complete tatters, even the likes of Latvia left with some credit...its really a lesson in the power of Mystery.
Was that down to the lads on the ground though, or the decision making from the higher ups?
 
#45
People were complaining about the state of soldier fitness when I joined in 98. Yet the guys who joined then and after were still able to do the business on the ground in Iraq etc.

If things have radically changed, perhaps it's the introduction of PAYD? I saw a video of an infantry lad showing off his single person room and he showed off his "kitchen" in his room (which seemed to comprise of a microwave and a kettle). It looked like he existed on super noodles.
We still had fat cnuts in 2003 they were just hidden (as well as a fat **** can hide) among everyone else.
Now the manning rates are at one of their lowest and biffness is running between 20-25% it's a bit more noticeable.
A reason why some people go on the biff is they can see just how easy it is. Shitbag officers refuse to address this and allow them the easy option. Once you are on the biff for a while it's quite easy to turn into a fat ****.
 
#46
I still think it all went wrong with the introduction of SLAM.

As mentioned previously, I ******* loved SLAM because I hated having to share a room with six ******* morons, but it led to an almost immediate drop in the concept of a 'team' - people who previously would go to their six or eight man room, chat, laugh and **** about, instead went into their SLAM, shut their door and said goodbye to the world.

You could routinely walk around all the blocks and see or hear no-one, whereas in the old blocks you'd hear talking, shouting, laughing, screaming, crying for help, etc.

That was a big turning point for many a Regiment, the team that was pretty much 24/7 became working hours only, bar a few things such as nights out, etc.
Was talking about this with the missus the other day and said exactly the same. I remember most doors being propped open and people wandering into each others rooms, competing with other stereos and tv's, tv rooms actually being used by the lads. Now as you say the lines seem empty because the doors are shut and locked, headphones on, zoned on the xbox.
Also the clamping down on the drink culture of the army. All us crusties remember Sqn Bars, non exemption parade happy hours on a Friday afternoon where the OC to the newest sprog were all in there, getting the chest pointing stuff off your chest, a bit of milling organised by the Sqn PTI in the middle of the bar, troops trying out sing each other, the bar being wrecked then rebuilt on Sunday over a pint. It was a work hard / play hard ethic, and it worked for the most part.
The young cool kids on FYB might call us relics, but we lived the better days before the snowflake politics made the army the way it is now.

Edited to add: PAYD!! Who the **** thought that was a good idea???
 
#47
Was talking about this with the missus the other day and said exactly the same. I remember most doors being propped open and people wandering into each others rooms, competing with other stereos and tv's, tv rooms actually being used by the lads. Now as you say the lines seem empty because the doors are shut and locked, headphones on, zoned on the xbox.
Also the clamping down on the drink culture of the army. All us crusties remember Sqn Bars, non exemption parade happy hours on a Friday afternoon where the OC to the newest sprog were all in there, getting the chest pointing stuff off your chest, a bit of milling organised by the Sqn PTI in the middle of the bar, troops trying outside each other, the bar being wrecked then rebuilt on Sunday over a pint. It was a work hard / play hard ethic, and it worked for the most part.
The young cool kids on FYB might call us relics, but we lived the better days before the snowflake politics made the army the way it is now.

The thing I don't get is students get their own accommodation/room in halls, and they don't lock themselves away, still socialise etc. They play xbox, playstation etc, but it's a group activity. The same when they move into a shared house.

Why are soldiers so different when they get their own room (is it the same in Germany too - where people were generally closer imo, because they didn't shoot off at the weekends etc)? Is it the way the SLAM is set-up? Do they have a decent communal area for people to eat together, get pissed etc?
 
#48
I agree with some of what he says, but the Forces are in a mildly different world now. Our profile was raised massively post 9/11 and of course now everyone has an internet. It would be really hard for the Forces as a whole to go back to being 'quiet professionals', every unit has to have an Faceache and Twatter feed- "here are some of our chaps standing next to some brown school children" etc. Which is fine, but it soon goes wrong when a bloke who made the front pages for good reasons gets caught by CDT and makes the headlines for the wrong reasons, or some very junior lads get into a photo op with TR etc.
 
#49
If the UK ever get invaded by China/Russia - and the government decide to call people up again to fight - I will tell them to piss off, fight for what? We don't live in a democratic country any more - just look how May is fcuking up Brexit and I'm not fighting so gays can have more rights and the great unwashed leftists PC brigade can sue me in a few years time once everything has 'blown over'.
They can all go and fcuk themselves if they think I would fight for them ever again. I'll look after myself and my own and that's it.
 

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#50
The thing I don't get is students get their own accommodation/room in halls, and they don't lock themselves away, still socialise etc. They play xbox, playstation etc, but it's a group activity. The same when they move into a shared house.

Why are soldiers so different when they get their own room (is it the same in Germany too - where people were generally closer imo, because they didn't shoot off at the weekends etc)? Is it the way the SLAM is set-up? Do they have a decent communal area for people to eat together, get pissed etc?
I've thought about this many a time. I think it comes down to being forced together by circumstance.

Soldiers are forced together. So they learn to live, eat, work and play together. Sometimes it's people making real friendships, othertimes it's all a bit unbearable but we make it work.

The second we were given our own private rooms to escape the majority of idiots that lurked about, the quicker we shut the door on them. My shared room was great with six of us, but I distinctly recall a number of fights, a number of falling outs, a number of drunken dramas, and a number of other such issues which made it almost unbearable at times.

If we have to, we will. If we don't, we won't.
 
#52
I've thought about this many a time. I think it comes down to being forced together by circumstance.

Soldiers are forced together. So they learn to live, eat, work and play together. Sometimes it's people making real friendships, othertimes it's all a bit unbearable but we make it work.

The second we were given our own private rooms to escape the majority of idiots that lurked about, the quicker we shut the door on them. My shared room was great with six of us, but I distinctly recall a number of fights, a number of falling outs, a number of drunken dramas, and a number of other such issues which made it almost unbearable at times.

If we have to, we will. If we don't, we won't.
I think students are also forced together to an extent, in the first year anyway. Then again, they also make friends outside of their halls too. The army you're kind of closed off and it would be weird if you made best-mates with someone in another squadron etc.

And I'd completely forgotten the drama you mention actually. It was dysfunctional at times. I'd probably shut myself off from the world too!
 
#53
COLONEL TIM COLLINS: How can our chubby, drug-addled and right-on Army protect us from our enemies? | Daily Mail Online

No paywall to bar anyone from reading. Good Daily Mail (or Mail on Sunday) fodder for the outraged classes before Church and a sermon on 'Life is a Cheeseburger' or whatever.

This part is more worrying than much of the rest, in my opinion:


- Which followed on from the Executive Summary:


We continue to dribble on about 'leadership' and 'management' in these columns, but tend (+/-) to miss the very highest elements of the strategic level; those which shape the actual requirement for a defence capability of any sort. Given the weird state of HMF over the past few years, the 'lawfare' treatment of soldiers (but oddly, not the more senior officers), the vast indefensible aircraft carriers, the ludicrous prioritising of identity politics within the ranks etc, I sometimes feel that the whole area of defence is too important for politicians to handle; someone else could surely do a better job. We need a Tsar.
The Mail on Sunday hates the military
 
#54
Has anybody confirmed the status or the lardy cvnt in the article.
Is he regular Army, or some form of hanger on?
Shush - "Enabler" is the correct news speak
 
#56
I still think it all went wrong with the introduction of SLAM.

As mentioned previously, I ******* loved SLAM because I hated having to share a room with six ******* morons, but it led to an almost immediate drop in the concept of a 'team' - people who previously would go to their six or eight man room, chat, laugh and **** about, instead went into their SLAM, shut their door and said goodbye to the world.

You could routinely walk around all the blocks and see or hear no-one, whereas in the old blocks you'd hear talking, shouting, laughing, screaming, crying for help, etc.

That was a big turning point for many a Regiment, the team that was pretty much 24/7 became working hours only, bar a few things such as nights out, etc.
The PlayStation didn't help, nor closing all Sqn bars
 
#58
The PlayStation didn't help, nor closing all Sqn bars
To be honest I think you could go a bit further and maybe blame it on online gaming to an extent. With the first xboxes etc, you could have a group of people sat on a sofa playing the xbox, golden eye on the nintendo etc (that's how I remember it working during corridor parties back in '99). Now I don't think that's possible and all multiplayer games have to be multiplayed over the internet.
 
#60
From the look of him, feeder would be more descriptive. How can he possibly still be on the payroll in that physical shape?
More mobile than a tub of Mountain house come the apocalypse?

Is he part of PAYD brexit contingency planning?
 
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