How can our chubby, drug-addled and right-on Army protect us from our enemies?

What no standard formula?

Do they just make it up, then?

Now you're just being a knob.
No my learned friend, someone makes a formal risk assessment for the activity, documents it all and then possibly requests drivers and vehicles. It would be a brave MTO that says no without legal representation.
 
I think it makes sense for low level sport and PT. It's how it works in civi street too. You might have someone who can do first aid, but even high risk sports like MMA, boxing etc don't require a medic on site (when training at least - competing it's different).
Exactly, when training on camp you should know where the nearest first aid kit is. The first aid kit is going to be in the vehicle if you’re out for a run, and disappear with the vehicle if it pops off to the Medcen.
 
one person goes down and the whole thing's off? Really? Maybe there were two because if one had to take a casualty back to SMC they could press-on?
One person going down with a life threatening injury absolutely should result in the whole thing being called off.

If it's not life threatening, they can receive first aid and sit it out in the wagon.
 
Exactly, when training on camp you should know where the nearest first aid kit is. The first aid kit is going to be in the vehicle if you’re out for a run, and disappear with the vehicle if it pops off to the Medcen.

Since leaving, I've realised in a lot of ways the army during my time was more risk aversive that civvie street. I remember during the chippy course I did at Chatham, one morning the workshop was below a certain temperature so they made us all stand outside on parade until it hit a certain temperature. Mental (especially when the temperature guidelines are just that).

Another time I did a H&S course, and we were told a previous student during the practical exercise started having a go at one of the receptionists because he said paper on the radiator was a fire risk. This guy would have gone back to his unit and behaved in exactly the same way - he's probably the one going around cutting the plugs off brand new kettles.
 
AGAI Vol 1, Chap 7 (Physical Trg) is your friend, the following is used as a footnote rather extensively:

"Ideally 2 or more vehicles to allow flexibility, vehicles with air conditioning should be used if available."

It would be relatively foolish not to follow written direction unless you had a strong justification ^~
 
Eh, the majority of sports training takes place out of hours, that’s why you get a mobile number. No one is being denied medical cover.
Eh, organised Unit phys takes place out of hours?

If the phys session is Unit organised, then it's within the Units (and the medics) hours.

Best of luck with your day in the Coroners Court if you're satisfied with a mobile phone number to cover medical dramas.
Mobile phone signal is always reliable. The bod on the end of the phone always picks up.

Unit medics are like rocking horse shit, but you can't move for wheels and drivers.
 
Eh, organised Unit phys takes place out of hours?

If the phys session is Unit organised, then it's within the Units (and the medics) hours.

Best of luck with your day in the Coroners Court if you're satisfied with a mobile phone number to cover medical dramas.
Mobile phone signal is always reliable. The bod on the end of the phone always picks up.

Unit medics are like rocking horse shit, but you can't move for wheels and drivers.
I haven’t been to a unit that is short of white fleet. MT drivers can be an issue but sub units provide. I don’t get what you are driving at unless you are trolling...
 
AGAI Vol 1, Chap 7 (Physical Trg) is your friend, the following is used as a footnote rather extensively:

"Ideally 2 or more vehicles to allow flexibility, vehicles with air conditioning should be used if available."

It would be relatively foolish not to follow written direction unless you had a strong justification ^~
The terms 'ideally' and 'if available' are carefully chosen.

They allow for a degree of common sense, which H&S legislation strives for, despite some of its practitioners determined efforts to remove risk, rather than to mitigate and reduce risk to an acceptable level.
 
The terms 'ideally' and 'if available' are carefully chosen.

They allow for a degree of common sense, which H&S legislation strives for, despite some of its practitioners determined efforts to remove risk, rather than to mitigate and reduce risk to an acceptable level.
I agree, and my interpretation is that 'ideally' is used in the context that the activity can continue if one vehicle has to remove someone to a medical facility. Because what is mandated is that certain activities will stop without the presence of a safety vehicle.

But here's the rub, its not just the practitioners who are risk averse at times, there is plenty of evidence to prove that our legislators do not take the common sense approach when the is a noisy clamour for compensation.

So if I was the OIC and I had the vehicles and manpower available to deploy 2 safety vehicles (because my regulations tell me that that is the ideal), why wouldn't I?
 
T
Recruitment is particularly difficult at the moment not only because it has been a predictable failure in outsourcing which wont continue for too much longer i think. It is a problem because in the past, people would join up because they had a mate who joined up and came back and told them all about it or they had a brother who was in. The army was part of our culture and everyone knew somebody who was serving or had served and word of mouth about the stories, the adventure, the laughs, the travels, the birds, the money. All that talk was worth it´s weight in gold when it came to recruiting and all the recruitment office NCO´s had to do was try to convince everyone to join the infantry instead of the trad they wanted. Guys had already decided that they wanted to join.
Guess they can't use this poster much, anymore?

 
We will soon leave the EU, with no deal, all going well and we must re-establish ourselves as a serious player if this is to become a success story - which it must - if nothing else than to show the EU that they were wrong about us. A larger military is a no brainer and a larger military brings economy of scale and solves problems like recruitment (believe it or not)
I would like for the UK to be part of the EU, but this, I can totally support.
 
Has it changed? When I did a stint as an RMA in the mid-2000s often we'd be tasked to provide medical cover for CFTs, sports, live firing range etc.
Live ranges we have a medic, I dont think Ive ever seen one on an AFT, They are in attendance for a lot of sports.
 
The terms 'ideally' and 'if available' are carefully chosen.

They allow for a degree of common sense, which H&S legislation strives for, despite some of its practitioners determined efforts to remove risk, rather than to mitigate and reduce risk to an acceptable level.
Right up until someone gets hurt, common sense goes out the ******* window, the MOD goes to court, the CO/OC/SSM/etc suddenly say "Not me jack", someone as low down the food chain that the Army can manage gets dry bummed raped and someone who stubbed their little toe gets a nice payout.

There are very few units that do not have access to two vehicles. 99 times out of 100 they will only ever need 1 jack wagon (or less). The 1 in 100 time is the one people dont want to risk.
 
One person going down with a life threatening injury absolutely should result in the whole thing being called off.

If it's not life threatening, they can receive first aid and sit it out in the wagon.
A few things,
You might not know its life threatening.
The individual might be in severe pain.
Not getting the injury treated as soon as possible may result in it becoming worse.
 
A few things,
You might not know its life threatening.
The individual might be in severe pain.
Not getting the injury treated as soon as possible may result in it becoming worse.
Hence why a medic on station is the safe bet.

Insisting on every casualty being evacuated immediately, regardless of their condition, raises the question of how many vehicles are required.

First cas goes down with a soft tissue injury - casevac'd.

Second cas goes down with a similar injury soon after - casevac'd.

What happens with subsequent casualties, particularly those who have life threatening injuries?

Overreaction to minor injuries leads to more potential for danger to the major injuries.
 
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