How can our chubby, drug-addled and right-on Army protect us from our enemies?

......yep, and in my day it was estimated that the GSFG were prepared to take a 1-3% live casualty rate during exercises.....and that was a stupid risk too
 
Perhaps I should clarify a little... My point about two jack wagons was that having more seats than punters seems to imply an excessive expectation of injury/ies. The distance and terrain is hardly taxing for fit young 20/30 year olds (it's a trade training location, not basic) given that I'm over 50 and do much the same route with my dogs most days.

When I was serving our risk assessment would have been "it's 10 mins from camp. If someone gets hurt then go back and get help, leave a few with him to stop it getting worse" there aren't many likely injuries that require such urgent return to camp that a jack wagon has to follow you the whole route.

With such a limp approach to risk in-camp I can't see how soldiers exercise their risk assessment skills to a state where they need to be on ops.

I'll hazard a guess and say when you were serving people didnt try to sue very often.
If someone has a heart attack, break their leg/ankle, creams in with heat injury (the latter two Ive seen on PT, the first one happened on a PT lesson at Gutersloh) waiting for 10 minutes isnt going to help, also if the person who sprinting back for help falls on their arse, a bad situation has just been made worse.

While I agree the approach to risk is a bit ****, everyone from Nick Carter downwards develops slopey soldiers when ambulance chasers come calling. Which is why those further down the food chain are learning to put up umbrellas to protect themselves.
As for risk assessments, if you can justify it then you are safe(ish), standing in court saying you didnt think you needed two jack wagons and due to that someones injury was made worse, because you couldnt be arsed probably wont be a good justification.
 
Block 6 at Templer Bks was crap. I had better accn in NI. I also had better food in NI. Not to mention more amd better shags.

I'm surprised you noticed the accomodation...what with being so very busy with all the course work, trade training, fitness training, duties and so on...


...oh, who the hell am I kidding... :)
 
The RM does have an occasssional biff Greggs gangster skulking in the background, likewise no doubt the Paras

But Why do the vast majority of both organisations look like muscled up, junkyard dogs with fight in their eyes

Corporate ethos, esprit de corps and management that upholds the above from first stepping off the station at lympschwitz/Catterick

Fatties in my day were hated DLs and an occasional Chef or store dweller

Having done support for joint lympstone and RMAS final exercises from my POV the RMAS lot were a shameful shower of shit

You need robust, high standards and the ethos inculcated even before joining up (99% need not apply)
Not a be gay and pray , don’t need to do pull-ups kind of vibe
 
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The RM does have an occasssional biff Greggs gangster skulking in the background, likewise no doubt the Paras

But Why do the vast majority of both organisations look like muscled up, junkyard dogs with fight in their eyes

Corporate ethos, esprit de corps and management that upholds the above from first stepping off the station at lympschwitz/Catterick
Plus steroids and the desire to hang around other sweaty, semi naked men.
 
When l first joined battalion, going sick was.........an experience.
Parade in No2s, carrying sausage bag with overnight kit and your "Survive to Fight" for reading material. Before going to the Med Centre you would be inspected by the RP Staff, so could count on a show parade that night.

Result = No one went sick
 
When l first joined battalion, going sick was.........an experience.
Parade in No2s, carrying sausage bag with overnight kit and your "Survive to Fight" for reading material. Before going to the Med Centre you would be inspected by the RP Staff, so could count on a show parade that night.

Result = No one went sick
That also resulted in some pretty sick people not seeking medical help.
 
When l first joined battalion, going sick was.........an experience.
Parade in No2s, carrying sausage bag with overnight kit and your "Survive to Fight" for reading material. Before going to the Med Centre you would be inspected by the RP Staff, so could count on a show parade that night.

Result = No one went sick
Including the bloke with sepsis? Try explaining why medical care isn’t easily available now, no a chance
 
When l first joined battalion, going sick was.........an experience.
Parade in No2s, carrying sausage bag with overnight kit and your "Survive to Fight" for reading material. Before going to the Med Centre you would be inspected by the RP Staff, so could count on a show parade that night.

Result = No one went sick
As others have said, presumably this includes people not going sick when something serious was up.

Reminds me of a joke I heard about Breast cancer - something like "in the old days, we didn't bother with doctors, we just called it itchy tits and died at the age of 30".
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
One injury can take the jack wagon away, leaving no cover for anyone else.
In this no win, no fee world, who wants to take risks?
Just let them do PT in their own individual jack wagons, that way if they feel like jacking it, they just peel off and head home.
 
Just let them do PT in their own individual jack wagons, that way if they feel like jacking it, they just peel off and head home.
I believe that's part of the new upcoming fitness tests.
 
I'm surprised you noticed the accomodation...what with being so very busy with all the course work, trade training, fitness training, duties and so on...


...oh, who the hell am I kidding... :)
Indeed. The time to which @Whiskeybreath is referring would have been our A1/D & D2. So all that stuff you list would have been irrelevant.

But we were a bunch of racing snakes, though.
 
Indeed. The time to which @Whiskeybreath is referring would have been our A1/D & D2. So all that stuff you list would have been irrelevant.

But we were a bunch of racing snakes, though.
I seem to recall my A1/D&D2 as one looooooong hangover... ;-)
 
I seem to recall my A1/D&D2 as one looooooong hangover... ;-)
I seem to recall . . . very little. I do remember a combat int argument with someone with a HQ 1 (Br) Corps-type background whereas I was much more Bde HQ/Dhofar.
 
I seem to recall . . . very little. I do remember a combat int argument with someone with a HQ 1 (Br) Corps-type background whereas I was much more Bde HQ/Dhofar.
I had a "discussion" with a DS on my A1 - he wanted to know if I had read the DS pink before one of the CPX type tests. I asked him why?

Apparently the DS wanted to know why, during my int brief, I had warned of the likelihood of enemy AA in certain areas and also the probablilty that certain potential LZs would be within range of en mortars etc. Aircrew should be briefed on this when selecting their routes in/out and planning LZs.

"How did you know this?" the DS insisted.

"I'm good at my job and briefed aircrew on the same thing during Op Corporate."

I was always a smug git though....
 
One injury can take the jack wagon away, leaving no cover for anyone else.
In this no win, no fee world, who wants to take risks?
Does one injury really need to take the Jack Wagon away?

Understandable if the injury requires medical intervention which can't wait until the phys session is finished, but if such a life threatening drama occurs, the phys could be suspended.

Otherwise, anyone dropping out can sit in the wagon of shame and look their muckers in the eye at the finish line.

There is no end to the 'what ifs?'

What if we need more than one Jack Wagon?

What if one (or both, if we're into the realms of improbables) of the Jack Wagons break down?

Jack Wagon contingency shouldn't become like lifeboat configurations on boats.
 
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