how bone is your missus.

NSP

LE
I always drink from the kitchen tap.

But that's because I can't get my mouth under the one on the washbasin.
 
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At the moment we are having a discussion about which taps are good to drink from within the house.
The ever lovely Mrs R has to have tap water from the kitchen for her bedside glass. Or any other glass, for that matter.
I filled mine up from the bathroom sink tap and she was horrified (we have been married for a long time, and she has seen me slake a thirst from much worse).
When did bathroom tap water become unsuitable for drinking? We don’t do filters, fancy taps or even bottled water. I’m genuinely baffled.
The same occured with my daughter, she was of the opinion that water in the bathroom was for washing and flushing the toilet and should not be used for drinking.
 

gorillaguts981

War Hero
I had a direct from the source tap installed when I put in a water softener as the process can leave salt in the supply. When I worked in Saudi, raw water came out of the tap which was from a de-sal plant and was undrinkable, so all potable water was from the cooler. For a couple of years after I got back, I would fill a jug and keep it I the fridge for drinking. I had a prejudice about drinking from the tap direct. Weird, I know but there was an aversion which took a while to overcome.
 
Possibly from a time when hot water came from the 'cylinder in the airing cupboard' and there was a cold header tank above it, the cold water in the bathroom also came from the header tank but the 'kitchen tap' was connected directly to the (lead) water pipe coming into the house and was therefore 'fresh' and better for you than water from a corroding galvanised tank with dead insects, spiders and possibly a pigeon decaying away in it.
Well that's what my Dad told me when he saw me drinking from the bath tap one day....
Ours had one of those pigeons too. I always assumed they came with the tank.
 
When did bathroom tap water become unsuitable for drinking? We don’t do filters, fancy taps or even bottled water. I’m genuinely baffled.
In UK housing, always - the kitchen tap is always connected to the mains and therefore is potable water. Most other taps will be connected to the water tank and generally isn't supposed to be drinking water.

and possibly a pigeon decaying away in it.
Yup, "pigeon water" as it's known here.
 

gorillaguts981

War Hero
When I looked in our tank, there was about 2 inches of limescale and the remains of several hundred woodlice. Apparently they do 'burials at sea' as well as dying under my shelf unit.
 
Just a mo' ago, she's sitting, doing the Mail Arrow Word as per usual for a Saturday.

"How do you spell 'Kaplinsky', you know, that newsreader Kate, I can't get it to fit."

"You mean Natasha."

Shoves paper under my snout, there's a picture.

(Sniggering) "That's Kate Silverton, S I L V"

"SHUT UP!"
 

Tool

LE
He's right you know. Kitchen sink, bathroom basin.
I used to think that it depends on what the kitchen receptacle is made of - ceramic or Zinc (aluminium nowadays). Apparently not. The word used to describe a basin with a drainpipe, and originiated in the Old English sincan, to submerge.
***Edited for spulleng
 
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Possibly from a time when hot water came from the 'cylinder in the airing cupboard' and there was a cold header tank above it, the cold water in the bathroom also came from the header tank but the 'kitchen tap' was connected directly to the (lead) water pipe coming into the house and was therefore 'fresh' and better for you than water from a corroding galvanised tank with dead insects, spiders and possibly a pigeon decaying away in it.
Well that's what my Dad told me when he saw me drinking from the bath tap one day....
My flat in Viewpoint Place Glasgow had that for all the cold taps, they got an exemption from the building regs in 1968 so they could claim the 500,00th council house in the UK and Harold Wilson opened the estate. Did not get upgraded until 2005.
 

RonS

Clanker
In UK housing, always - the kitchen tap is always connected to the mains and therefore is potable water. Most other taps will be connected to the water tank and generally isn't supposed to be drinking water.



Yup, "pigeon water" as it's known here.
All cold taps are normally connected to the incoming supply directly. You can check by turning off the incoming cold water (usually under your sink) and opening the cold taps.
 
No. They are not.
I don't think I've ever lived in a house where they weren't. It was my belief that the cold water tank connection to bathroom cold taps was only used where there was low mains pressure.
My current house is 1990's vintage, and all the cold taps are mains connected.
 
I don't think I've ever lived in a house where they weren't. It was my belief that the cold water tank connection to bathroom cold taps was only used where there was low mains pressure.
My current house is 1990's vintage, and all the cold taps are mains connected.

"Many older properties have cold water storage tanks in the roof space or loft. In most cases thisstorage tank will provide cold water to upstairs bathrooms but in some properties all of the cold water taps may be fed from this tank."

"In older houses the kitchen cold tap maybe the only tap connected directly to the mains."

Every house I have lived in has been like that - 1950s, 1920s, 19th century, 16th century.

New properties tend to connect the mains feed up. I've seen two different reasons given for the usage of a water storage tank - 1) to cope during any supply issue and 2) to prevent impurities getting back into the main. No idea if either is correct.
 

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