How accurate is Contact (1985)?

Also mix that with the soldiers experience prior to those tours. As CSM said, early troubles you would have lots of Aden vets

Had a Cpl in my pl with both the Borneo and NI clasps on his GSM.
 
It would not have been possible for any soldier to gain all the clasps awarded with the GSM 1962, but this guy comes close: Private R.R. Devar Argyle and Sutherland Highlanders. His army number ( 23476699 ) indicates he enlisted around 1955-56
GSM 1962 multi clasp 23476699.jpg
 
It would not have been possible for any soldier to gain all the clasps awarded with the GSM 1962, but this guy comes close: Private R.R. Devar Argyle and Sutherland Highlanders. His army number ( 23476699 ) indicates he enlisted around 1955-56
View attachment 610383
The clasp for Malay Peninsua wasn't for the Malay Emergency of 1948-60 though, but for dealing with Indonesian SF landings on the mainland of Peninusula Malaya in 1964 and 1965 during Confrontation.
 
The clasp for Malay Peninsua wasn't for the Malay Emergency of 1948-60 though, but for dealing with Indonesian SF landings on the mainland of Peninusula Malaya in 1964 and 1965 during Confrontation.
That is about right since his Malay Peninsula Clasp was awarded after his Borneo Clasp. Borneo was 20 Jan 1963 to 11 Aug 1966. South Arabia was 1 August 1964 to 30 Nov 1967 and Northern Ireland 14 Aug 1969 - 31 July 2007. It all fits, including the physical attachment of the Clasps. I suspect he was a 22 year man.
ETA The Argyles first NI Tour was 28 July - 28 Nov 1972, so the man was still a Pte after c. 16 years service when he qualified for the 'Clasp Northern Ireland' - Salt of the earth.
 
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Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
One thing I don't think has been mentioned is that the actors portraying the Toms are of the right age for a change , their bergens appear to be full and yes , they look bloody knackered .
To add : An old Morris 1100 in good nick these days fetches as much as £5000 , which shows just how inflated classic car prices are these days , but then again , there are no fancy electronics in them , so perhaps they ought to re start production
 
I think it was autobiographical rather than being a thriller. I certainly don't recall an KGB stuff.
The incidents from it that stay with me are these:
  • They have reason to go into a bar and somehow one of them ends up racing a pint against a local loudmouth. The Bootie wins and they leave but the next day they see the loudmouth and his arm has been broken for losing to a Brit.
  • There is a raid or set to of some sort in a (seperate?) bar and in the aftermath one of the RM stitches up some punters head using whiskey to clean the wound area.
  • The author and his unit are involved in dealing with disorder. His friend "Froggy" (who is due to transfer) is hit and injured by something like a brick and is last seen saying his goodbyes to hime from the back of a four tonner. The author never sees him again as by the time they return to their barracks "Froggy" has been transfered.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Had a Cpl in my pl with both the Borneo and NI clasps on his GSM.
That wouldn't be my father, as he didn't have his stripes up then having left during the disbandments at the end of the 1960s and then re-enlisted, but he'd have matched that medal stack, plus a UN medal for Cyprus.

Nor was he infantry by then, but RAOC, who sent a formed company to support (from memory) 7RHA in 1973. A sadly departed ARRSEr, Thai_Exile, was his commanding officer.

Yes, hard, rough men and different times - which was one reason that police primacy was eventually (and rightly) pursued as a policy.

Some of the stories my father has told me in later years are hair-raising. Plenty of others will have had similar experiences. What's sad is that the actions of many, as ever, get judged at a distance in time and in calmer circumstances and by those with specific agendas.

As my father put it to me: "I'd found and seen the bodies of some of those who the IRA had tortured. No way were they capturing me. I'd have topped myself first."

The reinvention in recent years of thugs and psychopaths as freedom fighters and heroes is nauseating.
 
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HaloMan has been quite open about his time as a hooligan!
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
One thing I don't think has been mentioned is that the actors portraying the Toms are of the right age for a change , their bergens appear to be full and yes , they look bloody knackered .
To add : An old Morris 1100 in good nick these days fetches as much as £5000 , which shows just how inflated classic car prices are these days , but then again , there are no fancy electronics in them , so perhaps they ought to re start production
Apparently an old car in good nick and no modern bolt-ons can be worth renting out to production companies who just want to populate a street in a period drama with the right cars.
 
Apparently an old car in good nick and no modern bolt-ons can be worth renting out to production companies who just want to populate a street in a period drama with the right cars.
Correct, a chap I knew regularly drove to where they were filming Heartbeat and just parked his classic car somewhere for the day and was paid handsomely.
 
I think it was autobiographical rather than being a thriller. I certainly don't recall an KGB stuff.
The incidents from it that stay with me are these:
  • They have reason to go into a bar and somehow one of them ends up racing a pint against a local loudmouth. The Bootie wins and they leave but the next day they see the loudmouth and his arm has been broken for losing to a Brit.
  • There is a raid or set to of some sort in a (seperate?) bar and in the aftermath one of the RM stitches up some punters head using whiskey to clean the wound area.
  • The author and his unit are involved in dealing with disorder. His friend "Froggy" (who is due to transfer) is hit and injured by something like a brick and is last seen saying his goodbyes to hime from the back of a four tonner. The author never sees him again as by the time they return to their barracks "Froggy" has been transfered.
Did it mention the time when the Marines were in the New Lodge and were so overworked that they requested help from the Parachute Regiment who were in Ardoyne?

When the PARA guys turned up at Girdwood Park they found the Marines playing volleyball in the sunshine so the Pln Sgt turned the vehicles around a d fücked off back to Flax St Mill.

It was actually in ‘74
 

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