Hoverglide Backpack

#1
Saw this on another medium and thought it might trigger a few discussions about load carrying, injuries, reduction thereof etc. It looks like a fairly sound idea and one that might work. It's called a Hoverglide Backpack:

 
#3
Saw this on another medium and thought it might trigger a few discussions about load carrying, injuries, reduction thereof etc. It looks like a fairly sound idea and one that might work. It's called a Hoverglide Backpack:



Looks a bit stupid and counter-productive to me.

If you are on dangerous terrain or broken ground, you need a heavy rucksack tight to your body so you can adapt to the centre of gravity/mass and control your movement and inertia. Having a loose or unbalanced heavy load invites injury or worse.

I notice that the individuals in the video all appear to be carrying feather pillows in their rucksacks...
 
#4
Looks a bit stupid and counter-productive to me.

If you are on dangerous terrain or broken ground, you need a heavy rucksack tight to your body so you can adapt to the centre of gravity/mass and control your movement and inertia. Having a loose or unbalanced heavy load invites injury or worse.

I notice that the individuals in the video all appear to be carrying feather pillows in their rucksacks...

Looks downright dangerous in those respects. Likewise I'm sure it would contribute no end to achieving tight groups, trying to aim with a counterweight bobbing up and down on you. And how precisely would it help the stress on joints if you're carrying the same weight anyway (not to speak of the additional weight of the backpack frame device itself)? To me it looks as if it would actually increase the stress on joints by subjecting them to pressure additional times.
There is a trend at the moment of marketing all kinds of superfluous and spurious technical gimmicks via social media. This one seems to me to be a classic example.
 

MrBane

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#6
Looks like a big pile of **** from a tactical perspective.

The weight is still there, and in my eyes, what you have is a load that rather than being fixed firmly to your body and thus your body movements (So you and the backpack, if fastened properly and the weight is packed properly move as one unit), is in fact a load that's not responding to your movements at all.

I've watched the first three seconds of that fanny in the lime doing star jumps for about four minutes now, and apart from the fact as already stated, they appear to be carrying nothing heavier than their dreams, the system looks almost like it's designed to cause injury rather than avoid it.

If you're carrying 45kgs, you're carrying 45kgs. Nobody in that promo moves like they're carrying weight of any significance. The system might aid somewhat, but it doesn't make that weight vanish. The same as this guy here:
Hoverglide – World’s 1st “floating” Backpack
He's running with no weight, at all. The shape of the pack, the way the pack responds to movement and how he runs says there's nothing in there.

Studies and tests at DARPA and elsewhere such as Berkley Bionics have shown that the only way to effectively reduce load bearing on shoulder carried weight via a mechanical system (No electrics) is to use an exo-skeleton system where the weight of the bag is transferred down the back braces to the footbeds, so that the weight is being pushed directly to the ground, none of it comes into contact with you, and a pneumatic system helps lift the knees.

I'm sure if this slider was the solution, they would've developed it aeons ago.

As it is, I've looked at the company behind it and it looks like a JML type affair and they're using some sneaky viral marketing systems to make it all seem swimmingly wonderful.

So that's my thoughts on that!

In terms of load bearing / weight and injury, a lot of it was down to how the bergen was packed. I remember one fanny at CO's PT getting destroyed, as during the bag check, in order to get his weight he'd put in an iron and his ammo boots (I wish I was kidding) a 1kg bag of pasta along with freeweights.

That's the sort of stuff that'll injure you.

My bag was always loaded to represent a tactical situation. My layout was dossbag at the bottom, then a weeks worth of ration boilies, packaged up, then a couple of trip flare tubes filled with sand to represent technical kit, and then water on top of that. I always used the hip belt - guys never used the hip belt, but it was the belt that spread the weight across the body rather than leaving it solely down the back.

I made sure the shoulder straps were well padded and kept it tight and high for the fit so the weigh was bearing down on my shoulders rather than pulling down on my spine (Like you see kids today with their backpacks at their arses).

Having said that, it made **** all difference when your training weight of 25kgs suddenly became 45kgs on tour, which suddenly became around 55kgs, plus armour, weapon and everything else. The joys of trying to lift yourself up from the kneeling!
 
#7
^I bought a plain green daysack from the regi PRI 20 years ago. It is still my go to every day grab bag. KISS applies.

There s a theme in Brave New World that a new product can only be introduced if it is more complex and uses more resources than what it replaces - Fordism is alive and well here.
 

MrBane

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#9
Why do people spend all this money on daysacks? This is indisputably the best one and costs next to nothing, sometimes even issued.
A simple but hugely effective mod for this, was strapping across the back of the pack into which you could stick your helmet.

So rather than clipping it against the hip, if you knew you didn't need it for a while, you'd just shove it behind the strapping and job done.
 
#10
My daysack had rotted to death with the sub-tropical climate, all the internal coating was peeled away and the clips were bleached and brittle. On recommendation I replaced it with an Eberlestock daybag. Subsequently met the owner of the company who told me he had recently tied up a deal with the Australian Army to supply X thousand as their new pack. It is comfy and works well.

I'll do a review on it if @MrBane deems it worthy.

 
#11
Saw this on another medium and thought it might trigger a few discussions about load carrying, injuries, reduction thereof etc. It looks like a fairly sound idea and one that might work. It's called a Hoverglide Backpack:

Now that is what you call a solution in search of a problem.

The (combined and/or cumulative) effects of a insecure load of, say, 25kg+, when running or jumping would be a personal injury lawyer's wet dream.
 
#13
The masses speak and they are right. Good bit of marketing on video but whole load of problems uncovered with the comments.
 

MrBane

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#15
An over engineered nonsense.

Another example is the mystery ranch range of bergans and day sacks

super expensive utter bonk

I got one to try out and it was heavy, over engineered and disfunctional
You've got to remember though that the US tactical market has some very suspect practices. If I recall, a tactical product made in the US cannot be sold at retail for less than it is sold to the military - hence why so much stuff is in the hundreds to buy.

Plus the tactical market there is obscene anyway, so people don't blink at paying $300+ for a shoddily made backpack. London Bridge Trading Company are another example of expensive gash backpacks

The cnuts.
 
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#16
An over engineered nonsense.

Another example is the mystery ranch range of bergans and day sacks

super expensive utter bonk

I got one to try out and it was heavy, over engineered and disfunctional
Which one?

THEIRS rave about Mystery Ranch*. Although I hear Arc'teryx and Arc'teryx design inspired bags <cough> Tasmanian Tiger <cough> are starting to make inroads.

Note: * I think it may be more a case of, "neh, neh, ne, ne, neeeh, we've got them and you haven't".
 
#17
You've got to remember though that the US tactical market has some very suspect practices. If I recall, a tactical product made in the US cannot be sold at retail for less than it is sold to the military - hence why so much stuff is in the hundreds to buy.

Plus the tactical market there is obscene anyway, so people don't blink at paying $300+ for a shortly made backpack. London Bridge Trading Company are another example of expensive gash backpacks

The cnuts.
If you look at the kelty range of bags the one sold to the military has to be made in the USA and costs around $400'ish........the exact same bag made in Vietpakinamdia for the civvy market is around $150.

That said Mystery Ranch has gained popularity from its cottage operation and is now also having stuff produced outside the US.

LBT ain't cheap, how they can justify $400+ for a pair of effectively work trousers I have no idea, I would expect hand made by Pixies on Saville Row for that. If you want really expensive take a look at TAD Gear.
 
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#18
My daysack had rotted to death with the sub-tropical climate, all the internal coating was peeled away and the clips were bleached and brittle. On recommendation I replaced it with an Eberlestock daybag. Subsequently met the owner of the company who told me he had recently tied up a deal with the Australian Army to supply X thousand as their new pack. It is comfy and works well.

I'll do a review on it if @MrBane deems it worthy.


That looks a bit short on the number of compartments available, or is there something more cunning going on?
 
#19
I had a Camelbak Trizip which had a Mystery Ranch system and it was pretty good.

Sadly one of the pockets let go but they replaced it with another pack, as they'd stopped making the TZ, which I flogged it to an Airsofter for loads as I didn't need a cam pattern amy more.

Bought an Osprey with their AG system - love it.
 

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