Household cavalry

Hb124

Crow
Do you need a drivers licence before joining the household cavalry, or is this unimportant as it is learnt after sandhurst.
thank you.
 
Unless your role requires you to drive, it will be your responsibility. Someone with more current knowledge will be along no doubt, but unless you are a "Driver", then you need to cough for your own.
 

Hb124

Crow
Any fool knows you do not need a driving licence for a horse. Pah!
I ask this because an integral role is driving tanks. I was wondering whether one had to have a license before applying as this is a major part
 
Last edited:

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
I ask this because an integral role is driving tanks. I was wondering whether one had to have a license before applying as this is a major part
Caveat. From the 1970s.

An integral rôle for a tank driver is to drive a tank. The army will train him. All crewmen will be trained as drivers. Commanders will probably learn to drive a tank on their troop leader course.

But. My good mucker Dave Pawley RIP drove Zero Alpha, the senior 6-wheeled regimental command Saracen (under the pre-1982 callsign system), for which he had been trained, on a group B licence (car, etc with an automatic gearbox, which technically it was, but very, very heavy). He'd probably driven Chieftain on a group H licence.

But his BFG group A car licence was provisional. As an RAC Crewman, he had no need of a group A licence. That was for RAC Soldiers.
 
Caveat. From the 1970s.

An integral rôle for a tank driver is to drive a tank. The army will train him. All crewmen will be trained as drivers. Commanders will probably learn to drive a tank on their troop leader course.
I always wondered, is it better to train a tank driver from absolute scratch, or one who already had a car license and knowledge of driving?
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
I always wondered, is it better to train a tank driver from absolute scratch, or one who already had a car license and knowledge of driving?
I have no idea, I'm afraid. I took a group A licence with me when I joined. Went to NI as drivers started disappearing on Scorpion courses ahead of rerôling as recce at end of tour, which got me gigs driving Makrolon-heavy Land Rovers and, after maybe ¼-hour learning the mysteries of the pre-select gearbox, Ferrets.

I do know that a couple of months later I was on the first in-house Scorpion driving course, and because I'd been driving for four years (and I'd bought a motorbike on return from Omagh), they obviously decided I was good to sit my group H test a week ahead of those who hadn't.

Edit. Proof that I ever sat in the driver's seat of a CVR(T).
It appeared previously in Your Worst Military Photo or somesuch thread. Taken a handful of years later, now a Control Signaller, having spent three years in Command Troop, I was sorting the driver's Clansman harness. The regimental photographer was mooching and caught me as I came up for air.

This picture came to light on the regimental Facebook group and received the comments, "Boggles (me) in the driver's seat? Is the world off its axis?" And "Look at the dut (a Geordie hat)." I did point out that it had more or less stayed on my head whilst upside down but had bounced off one or two sharp harness boxes etc whilst down there.
 
Last edited:

BopBopBop

War Hero
I always wondered, is it better to train a tank driver from absolute scratch, or one who already had a car license and knowledge of driving?
My very first "proper" driving lessons and driving test were in a Chieftain when I was about 18.
Think I just had an army driving permit in Germany at the time?

Got my normal licence soon after on a Landrover.

I have probably driven everything since like an MBT but have noticed the other cars don't get out of your way as fast.

You do appreciate stopping distances more.
 
My very first "proper" driving lessons and driving test were in a Chieftain when I was about 18.
Think I just had an army driving permit in Germany at the time?

Got my normal licence soon after on a Landrover.

I have probably driven everything since like an MBT but have noticed the other cars don't get out of your way as fast.
As long as you don’t get crossbind
 

Bobby_Bert

Old-Salt
Hi,

As stated above- you do not have to possess a driver’s license in prior to attending RMAS.

Do not confuse the role between Soldier & Officer within HCav. It is very unlikely that an officer would routinely drive the CVR (T) range of vehicles. Search Household Cavalry on the Army careers site for more information on the role. See here: Household Cavalry

Each term at RMAS they run an Arms and Services fair for Officer Cadets to showcase the wide variety of careers available to them in the Army.⁠ Should you be successful and get that far you will have the chance to see a wide variety of the Army's kit and equipment, as well as to speak to ranks from many different units. This will help you to make an informed decision about which corps or regiments to apply to later in your time at the Academy.

As recently discussed on another thread, it is unwise to attend RMAS with the sole intention of joining one particular Regiment or Corps. It is best to keep an open mind should your “plan A” not pan out.

By all means research The Household Cavalry. Pay attention to the arrival of the very first “Ares” armoured fighting vehicle and the implications this will have. Also note how their D Sqn recently have been utilising the Warrior armoured fighting vehicle, in preparation for their transition to the AJAX platform. All information is available on the website and various forces news outlets.

Very best of luck with the application.
 
I always wondered, is it better to train a tank driver from absolute scratch, or one who already had a car license and knowledge of driving?
Years ago when I did my Police Advanced Car Course, one of the PCs in my car was exactly that. He was the police equivalent of a depot driver, passed his test at 17, and not driven until his Standard course a few years later and scraped that. He'd transferred to firearms and therefore needed his advanced ticket.

We talked this through in the car over the course, I thought it'd be an interesting experiment as on one hand he's been trained correctly, with no chance for bad habits to develop. On the other he was an inexperienced driver, and Vauxhall Astra to BMW 535d/Audi A6 Quattro is a hell of a jump.
Unfortunately he failed, he just didn't have the experience behind the wheel to make the grade. He had a second go after some mentoring, gained his Class 1 and went on to pass the Pursuit and TPAC module.

I'd think the same applies to any sort of vehicle, if you know how vehicles behave, the highway code, spacial awareness and general roadcraft you'll be in a far better position than someone who gets in the Chally instruction tank and hasn't got a clue what he's doing and then trying to teach him how to operate it safely.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
roadcraft
My brother was in the Northumbria Constabulary Special Patrol Group. The day I passed my group A test, he handed me his copy of Roadcraft, by HMSO, compulsory reading in his rôle. Reading that has served me well over nearly 50 years.
 

BopBopBop

War Hero
My brother was in the Northumbria Constabulary Special Patrol Group. The day I passed my group A test, he handed me his copy of Roadcraft, by HMSO, compulsory reading in his rôle. Reading that has served me well over nearly 50 years.
Off the top of my head.

The system of car control is a system or drill each feature of which is considered in sequence by the driver.....

On my advanced course giving commentary at high speed.

Heavy breaking combined with clenched teeth and white knuckles.

"Revised the plan!"
 

NemoIII

War Hero
It is very unlikely that an officer would routinely drive the CVR (T) range of vehicles.
They dont even get Cat H do they?

Our officers were shown a very basic lesson on how to drive. I think the context being is if they are the last remaining crewman they are still able to drive the vehicle out of danger.

Doubt this would ever be the case other than Ops, I've personally never seen a Officer drive a vehicle.
 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
MOD comment.

I see people are struggling with the forum rules again.

If it isn’t accurate, up to date and helping to answer the OPs question it doesn’t belong here. Comedy attempts to the NAAFI, general driving chat to the motoring board.
 
MOD comment.

I see people are struggling with the forum rules again.

If it isn’t accurate, up to date and helping to answer the OPs question it doesn’t belong here. Comedy attempts to the NAAFI, general driving chat to the motoring board.
Damn, I was about to regale the young man with war stories from the D&M phase of my Tp Ldrs’ course of 1983. You’ve quite spoiled my afternoon.

Anyway, to the OP, good luck and I hope you have a fab time at Sandhurst.
 
No. You don't. You will be put through your driving license whilst at RMAS if you don't have it already (full and manual) although you lose a week of AT or leave to do so

Sent from my ONEPLUS A6003 using Tapatalk
 
Do you need a drivers licence before joining the household cavalry, or is this unimportant as it is learnt after sandhurst.
thank you.
No, you will get taught at Bovington if you don't already have a driving licence. You will need a licence to learn the basics of driving a tank during the Driving and Maintenance phase of the Troop Leaders' course.
 

Latest Threads

Top