Hospital sends war hero, 101, home to die wearing a nappy..

#2
Typical of the modern world, however, I would ask, where were his loving caring and angered family while he was in the hospital and taxi?

Surely you would go to pick up your 101 year old father?
 
#3
What has 'This country' got to do with it?

This is happening up and down the Country to lots of people with far less an illustrious history than the late Brig. Platt.

This Country is always worth it, and will always be worth it. Some of the individuals and Health trusts within it however , in the past have proven not.

Is there any other reason this was done, other than to save Money/PCH? Or did Brig. Platt summon the last of his strength to let it be known he wished to die at home?

..and how does it take an hour to get from Salisbury to Morpeth?
 
#4
"Some aspects of Brig Platt’s discharge from hospital in 2006 were unacceptable....."

Putting aside the immediate urge to remove all of the front teeth of the "spokesperson", this sickening story is maybe two years old.

What has prompted it to surface only now?
 
#5
Gren said:
Typical of the modern world, however, I would ask, where were his loving caring and angered family while he was in the hospital and taxi?

Surely you would go to pick up your 101 year old father?
I have to agree with you Gren, the family should have raised these issues prior to discharge not after. I kind of get the impression that they didnt visit either because of the soiled clothes in a bag in the locker, relatives would normally bring fresh in and take dirties away for washing.

oh, and an hour from salisbury to morpeth?
 
#6
Gren said:
Typical of the modern world, however, I would ask, where were his loving caring and angered family while he was in the hospital and taxi?

Surely you would go to pick up your 101 year old father?
Not if he'd just shat himself!! Bloody right you'd throw him a taxi!
 
#7
Blogg said:
"Some aspects of Brig Platt’s discharge from hospital in 2006 were unacceptable....."

Putting aside the immediate urge to remove all of the front teeth of the "spokesperson", this sickening story is maybe two years old.

What has prompted it to surface only now?
Are his family about to sue the Trust?

I thought Hospital SOP's were to inform the NOK that the patient is about to be discharged?
 
#8
Given his age I would assume that his daughter-in-law would be in her late 70s early 80s herself & even if she was aware of him being discharged, I doubt she was in a position to help him anyway.
 
#9
smudge67 said:
Not if he'd just shat himself!! Bloody right you'd throw him a taxi!
Would being driven from Salisbury District Hospital to Northumberland in just one hour not cause anyone to sh1t themself? :omg:
(Or have I got the wrong end of the stick? :oops: )

Brig Platt, who took part in one of the fiercest battles of the Italian campaign during the Second World War, died several days after his hour-long journey home to Morpeth, in Northumberland.
 
#10
sunami said:
Given his age I would assume that his daughter-in-law would be in her late 70s early 80s herself & even if she was aware of him being discharged, I doubt she was in a position to help him anyway.
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/comment/obituaries/article606446.ece

In 1940, he married Isobel Fenwick who predeceased him. He is survived by two sons.

Brigadier John Platt, DSO, OBE, commanding officer, 2nd Battalion Somerset Light Infantry at the crossing of the Garigliano in 1944, was born on June 17, 1905. He died on October 16, 2006, aged 101.
No, his oldest offspring would have been 66.

There's a large chink missing from this narrative. I'm all in favour of lambasting those that treat our veterans callously , but what are the actual facts here? Brig. Platt was based in Wiltshire, where does Northumberland come into it?
 
#11
Blogg said:
"Some aspects of Brig Platt’s discharge from hospital in 2006 were unacceptable....."

Putting aside the immediate urge to remove all of the front teeth of the "spokesperson", this sickening story is maybe two years old.

What has prompted it to surface only now?
"His case came to light as Nial Dickson, chief executive of the health thinktank the King's Fund, warned of a deterioration of compassion from under-pressure staff in NHS hospitals."

A fuller story; http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/402...uman-dignity-by-hospital-care-family-say.html
 
#12
#13
sunami said:
Blogg said:
"Some aspects of Brig Platt’s discharge from hospital in 2006 were unacceptable....."

Putting aside the immediate urge to remove all of the front teeth of the "spokesperson", this sickening story is maybe two years old.

What has prompted it to surface only now?
"His case came to light as Nial Dickson, chief executive of the health thinktank the King's Fund, warned of a deterioration of compassion from under-pressure staff in NHS hospitals."

A fuller story; http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/402...uman-dignity-by-hospital-care-family-say.html
Knowing he was dying after losing the ability to swallow food, he asked to go home. But no ambulance was available so he was sent in a taxi on an hour-long journey to the care home where he died a few days later.
So, sloppy journalism from the Mail. Quelle surprise :roll:

I have my own views on whacking parents into Care Homes, then shouting the odds.

Suffice to say my mother is never going into one, no matter what it takes.
 
#14
Having experienced this hospitals sloppiness first hand and their complete neglect of patients this comes as no surprise. They really dont care when you complain either yet wonder why people sue.

And PTP, I fully agree with you ref care homes.
 
#15
just as another point of view, my Nan was sent to a rest home to recuperate following a fall and she really REALLY didn't want to go home. She lived in a bungalow with my uncle, but had no company during the day, needed help getting in and out of bed etc. Being in the home she had the company of people she'd known in her heyday, was looked after wonderfully and was totally gutted when she was deemed ready to go home. Not all homes are created equal. She died on saturday, peacefully, but never stopped rabbiting on about how lovely it was in the home.
 
#16
Bigbird I concur, I saw my grandparents cared for in an exemplary fashion in a fantastic care home. My grandmother was virtually unconscious for the last 5 years, but throughout they maintained her dignity and the care was 100%, and given that most of the care home staff are not on NHS wages, but significantly less, its a tribute to their dedication.
When it comes to our NHS establishments, it is a top down policy that impacts the care given to people. I visited my mother who was in one of the "foundation hospitals" It was filthy, the nurses didnt seem to be bothered, and sat chatting and reading magazines while other patients on the ward were requesting assistance. All in all a very sloppy organisation.
 
#17
Some homes are very pleasant and enhance the last days of the inpatients. They allow for socialising, reminesing about when chicken tasted like chicken, and a better class of care.

On the flip side, if an old fogey wants to go home, where they can be with family it is still possible to provide adequate care. My gran gets four visits a day, in the mean time she can sit with granddad and reminese and take visitors.

Both should be used, and both should always have the highest standards of care and lifestyle at their heart.

Unfortunatley, the NHS is overburdened keeping glue sniffing smack heads and aids ridden foreigners alive.
 
#18
Putting the old chap in a taxi may have been the best method of getting him home if his relatives hadn't turned up pick him up.
Putting him in a nappy was probably the best thing for him if he was incontinent, far better catch it all in a nappy than have it all over his clothing.
I would question quite where they thought they were sending a 101 year-old incontinent man though since he clearly could not look after himself, I suppose that is all down to Social Services so no surprises if they, once again, dropped the ball. Perhaps it's as much an indictment of our family system as of our hospitals.
Like PTP I will not let my Dad (87) or my Mother In Law (72) be in a home they don't want to be in, I will care for either or both of them to the best of my ability as long as that is what they want.

Please don't confuse Salisbury District Hospital with the Hospice at the same location. They looked after my brother to the last with compassion, utmost care and preservation of dignity and even took the time to talk to us after he had gone, he could not have been better looked after and neither could all his friends and family who were there to see him off.
 
#19
[
Brig Platt, who took part in one of the fiercest battles of the Italian campaign during the Second World War, died several days after his hour-long journey home to Morpeth, in Northumberland.
[/quote]

Probably some foreign taxi driver having Tom Tom problems!
 
#20
chocolate_frog said:
Unfortunatley, the NHS is overburdened keeping glue sniffing smack heads and aids ridden foreigners alive.
To be fair you'd have to include the 40-a-day smokers with heart and lung problems, the 34 stone pie-mountains with backache and arthritis and old people!!!
 

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