Horses, mules, donkeys, other equines and large quadrupeds . . . not suitable for the dog, or the cat, threads.

Be very careful to do your research when thinking of buying a pony from a dealer



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Dangerous at both ends, and uncomfortable in the middle...;)
 
Done, I'll let you know what response I get.

Prices are starting to come down, there will be a glut of cheap horses soon and rescues will be full to bursting when all the lockdown buyers get hit with the reality of keeping a horse, especialy through the winter. It's already started with cats and dogs.

Have you tried rescues? They might have just what you need.

These are in Lincolnshire . . .

 

PFGEN

GCM
When looking for a pony it depends very much on the area you live in. I know that round the Geneva area in Switzerland ponies and horses go for silly money. A case of people with too much of the stuff. They'll buy what we would describe as an average animal for the price of an expensive car; madness.

My own parish is basically horse country. Ponies and horses a plenty and unless you're looking for a top pedigree or a trained animal than prices are cheap. Shetland ponies are given away at competitions as prizes! They do make good companions for a lonely horse in the field. Their market value is around fifty euros.

I went to an auction with my horse friend and I suggested to her that we bid on a couple just to say we'd bid at the auction. Thankfully we didn't, some of the animals were going for the opening bid and they had good blood lines. We could easily have filled the trailer with new stock. Shop around a bit. Its possible to buy a good/sound animal for not much money.

I'd say there are two options on the pony front. First is buy a young one and train them yourself assuming child can ride. That way you know exactly what the pony has been through. Some people who make them, and horses, saddle sure should be taken out and shot. The second option is to buy an older pony from somebody who has grown and is moving up, say from a c-pony to a d-pony and needs to sell the first one.

If your just looking for a lawnmower then give a rescue animal a second chance. We once rescued a young stallion (7 years) that had been so badly ridden in show jumping it couldn't even jump a pole. Just speaking gently to him would result in him burying his head in my jacket (eyes covered) and he'd soak up some affection. Medical treatment and a few months TLC resulted in a beautiful horse that went on to a good home.
 
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:) :) :) . . .

 
Follow link for more informative - and, silly - baby elephant stuff . . . ;)

The elephant fact about feet.
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Elephants feet are surprisingly complex yet rather endearing and remarkably graceful. Take a look at the anatomy of an elephant’s foot; it’s formed in such a way that these gentle giants walk on the very tips of their five toes. Asian elephants have one more toenail per foot than the African species, five on the front feet and four on the back; not all of the toes have nails! Tough, fatty tissue makes up the soles of the feet that act as shock absorbers; their spongy feet mean that they walk almost silently and have the ability to creep up on people unawares; just one of their many super-hero traits.

The gestation period for a baby elephant is so long that their toenails grow over the soles of their feet.
The second picture was one of Haven’s feet and the third one is Luna when they were first born; the nails are wrapped protectively around their feet.
❤️
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❤️


Over the first few weeks, a baby begins to ‘find his feet’ and starts running around; naturally, the toenails will wear away.
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Follow link for more informative - and, silly - baby elephant stuff . . . ;)

The elephant fact about feet.
1f418.png
1f418.png


Elephants feet are surprisingly complex yet rather endearing and remarkably graceful. Take a look at the anatomy of an elephant’s foot; it’s formed in such a way that these gentle giants walk on the very tips of their five toes. Asian elephants have one more toenail per foot than the African species, five on the front feet and four on the back; not all of the toes have nails! Tough, fatty tissue makes up the soles of the feet that act as shock absorbers; their spongy feet mean that they walk almost silently and have the ability to creep up on people unawares; just one of their many super-hero traits.

The gestation period for a baby elephant is so long that their toenails grow over the soles of their feet.
The second picture was one of Haven’s feet and the third one is Luna when they were first born; the nails are wrapped protectively around their feet.
❤️
1f418.png
❤️


Over the first few weeks, a baby begins to ‘find his feet’ and starts running around; naturally, the toenails will wear away.
1f60d.png


There's something totally captivating and endearing about baby elephants, especially the (relatively) tiny one playing in the water. He/she is so joyous and having such a wonderful time
 
There's something totally captivating and endearing about baby elephants, especially the (relatively) tiny one playing in the water. He/she is so joyous and having such a wonderful time
There are not enough "love heart" emojees, for this one . . . "as she races home for bed".

Kerrio, a little life saved.

This little orphaned elephant is all legs as she races home for bed. Her story began at night in a hail of gunshots. The next morning, Kerrio's squeals attracted the attention of tribesmen who reported the lone tiny baby. A rescue was set in motion and we chartered a helicopter to fly to Northern Kenya, amid a dramatic thunderstorm, to bring her back to our Nursery. Here, it transpired she couldn’t stand, a worrying blow for us all. But from the outset, her happy-go-lucky and affectionate personality - as well as her sheer determination - shone through. Now, thanks to the fullness of time, and dedication of our Keepers, she is able to walk unaided, albeit wobbly. Considering all she has been through, every step is testament to her tremendous recovery and continued progress!

This #FosterFriday, you can adopt Kerrio for yourself (or as a gift for a loved one) and help fund the specialist care she - and the other orphans - need to thrive. Learn more about adopting Kerrio at: https://www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org/orphans/kerrio

 
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There are not enough "love heart" emojees, for this one . . . "as she races home for bed".

Kerrio, a little life saved.

This little orphaned elephant is all legs as she races home for bed. Her story began at night in a hail of gunshots. The next morning, Kerrio's squeals attracted the attention of tribesmen who reported the lone tiny baby. A rescue was set in motion and we chartered a helicopter to fly to Northern Kenya, amid a dramatic thunderstorm, to bring her back to our Nursery. Here, it transpired she couldn’t stand, a worrying blow for us all. But from the outset, her happy-go-lucky and affectionate personality - as well as her sheer determination - shone through. Now, thanks to the fullness of time, and dedication of our Keepers, she is able to walk unaided, albeit wobbly. Considering all she has been through, every step is testament to her tremendous recovery and continued progress!

This #FosterFriday, you can adopt Kerrio for yourself (or as a gift for a loved one) and help fund the specialist care she - and the other orphans - need to thrive. Learn more about adopting Kerrio at: https://www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org/orphans/kerrio

The sanctuaries do such woderful work, but apart from the odd accident here and there, they shouldn't have to. Greed and superstition, exert a high toll on these beautiful creatures and so many more
 
Got one ! Joey, 14.1 hh, aged 23. I'll pick him up next week, two very excited girl children, though not as excited as their mother I think. £1500, with tack and two rugs.
Chuffed doesn't cover it.
 
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