• ARRSE have partnered with Armadillo Merino to bring you an ARRSE exclusive, generous discount offer on their full price range.
    To keep you warm with the best of Merino gear, visit www.armadillomerino.co.uk and use the code: NEWARRSE40 at the checkout to get 40% off!
    This superb deal has been generously offered to us by Armadillo Merino and is valid until midnight on the the 28th of February.

Hong Kong Kai Tak Airport

#4
You don't go into Kai Tak anymore - The current HK airport is Chek Lap Kok.

However you are right... Kai Tak was (I think) the only airport with a curved approach and the pilots had to be specially trained / certificated. Never been there but bet it was something different.
 
#5
Wow, that brought back some memories :D Best landing I have ever experienced, and its been the only time that I have witnessed 90% of the passengers turn a subtle shade of green :lol:

I just wish I had had the pilots eye view and not seat A row 15 in cattle class :(

Thanks for posting
 
#6
was posted there for a year, and the landing was something else, nothing but sea on three sides of you.
Osbourne Bks was under the flight path to Kai Tak, and the sharp right turn that the planes took was visible from my bedroom window. I could see the chequerboard where the planes turned behind my a/c unit as I lay in bed. Watching tv was near on impossible twice a day as the planes were going over every 4 minutes.
The Cathay Pacific pilots would always try to fly as close to the hatch bar in Osbourne bks as possible. There was a bar downtown were you could get onto his roof and watch the planes fly over you while resting on sunloungers.
I only landed there once, and only took off once as well.
Not sure when it closed, but the new airport itself was finished (if not actually functioning) in mid 97 when I came home.
 
#7
zazabell_012 said:
Wow, that brought back some memories :D Best landing I have ever experienced, and its been the only time that I have witnessed 90% of the passengers turn a subtle shade of green :lol:

I just wish I had had the pilots eye view and not seat A row 15 in cattle class :(

Thanks for posting
Likewise - definately one of the most entertaining airports (as a passenger)to land at. Did it a couple of times in 1995, and definately turned most passengers green (and a few pilots too)! The locals who lived under the approach must have had some of the most pronounced deafness on the planet.

Although, I do look at The Hudson River in a whole different new light these days, when flying into Newark. :)
 
#10
aah kai tak airport, i used to sit for hours staring out of the balcony watching various aircraft do their approach. fly straight towards the checker board then chuck in a right turn at the required moment, it used to amaze me how some of them landed the angles they approached at, some of them looked like they were landing sideways.
 
#12
I lived in Infantry House, Osborne Bing Fong for two years.....those checker boards were right on the hill just behind the block.
Made for some interesting photos.....especially when a Typhoon was blowing up and they were trying to get as many as they could on the ground.

Ahh, two years of alcoholic haze.
 
#13
:D our flats at North Point looked down onto Kai Tak, i spent hours sat watching the planes from the sun terrace on the roof!! Or wandering round Stinky's market watching the pale faces of abject terror looking out of the windows as they seemingly just missed the rooftops :D
 
#14
We lived for 6 months in a high rise on Boundary Street, before moving up to Durham Court on Kowloon Tsai.

Was great fun watching the airliners pass about 100 ft overhead and, eventually, easy enough to sleep through.
 
#15
anyone there when the Air China jumbo fell off the run way into the sea, think it was 1994, I was at the BMH, heard it on the radio, we could see the tip of the runway from the coffee room but couldnt quite see the plane in the sea.
Went out on a flight not long after, the plane was out of the sea and on land, all markings had been obscured.
 
#16
Filbert Fox said:
anyone there when the Air China jumbo fell off the run way into the sea, think it was 1994, I was at the BMH, heard it on the radio, we could see the tip of the runway from the coffee room but couldnt quite see the plane in the sea.
Went out on a flight not long after, the plane was out of the sea and on land, all markings had been obscured.
Air China - now that's one bunch I refuse to fly with. Mickey Mouse outfit doesn't even start to describe them. *shudder*
 
#18
It was the Taiwanese version of China Airlines, brand new frame as well. Caused a huge amount of disruption, but I had a prime seat when the police blew the tail off to allow the airpot to return to full capacity. The plane didn't float, the harbour is pretty shallow at that point.

There was also a similar incident in the 80's when a Lufthansa jet piled in at the end of the runway, and it took the Gurkhas several days to move it including a large amount of manual labour.

Probably no coincidence that they were both cargo planes, don't think the pilots graduated to passenger flights, and the weather was rubbish on both days.

My favourite though was when you took off from the sea end, headed straight at the checker board. But flying in I could see my flat on Broadcast Drive (opposite Osborne Barracks) as I flew in.
 
#19
Filbert Fox said:
anyone there when the Air China jumbo fell off the run way into the sea, think it was 1994, I was at the BMH, heard it on the radio, we could see the tip of the runway from the coffee room but couldnt quite see the plane in the sea.
Went out on a flight not long after, the plane was out of the sea and on land, all markings had been obscured.
There was a major crash during the Vietnam war when a plane carrying US servicemen overshot and most (if not all) the passengers were lost. My memory is that it was a civil airliner on charter but I might be wrong.
Even with the huge number of casualties in VN, it seemed especially tragic to be killed on the way there.

Took some good shots from the Chequer Board (The Lion Rock) , It involved walking up through the park and then through a chainlink fence, one end of which previous visitors had kindly rolled back.

Very strange seeing the planes heading straight towards us and then turning. I made the mistake of having a 200mm fixed lens which meant when the plane was at the nearest point, it was too close to get all the plane in the shot. Got some good shots of touch-downs though, I never realized before just how much smoke is given off by the tyres when they hit the tarmac
 
#20
[quote="Tawahi-50
There was a major crash during the Vietnam war when a plane carrying US servicemen overshot and most (if not all) the passengers were lost. My memory is that it was a civil airliner on charter but I might be wrong.
Even with the huge number of casualties in VN, it seemed especially tragic to be killed on the way there.

Took some good shots from the Chequer Board (The Lion Rock) , It involved walking up through the park and then through a chainlink fence, one end of which previous visitors had kindly rolled back. [/quote]


It was a C-130 with US Marines on board, abit before my time, but everytime there was a prang it came up, you are right nearly all of them died 50+ IIRC.

The Cathay Pacific pilots used to have a race to see who could get between one of the markers and the checker board in the quickest time, never found out who held the record. It was a closely guarded secret.
 

Latest Threads