Hong Kong - Its past, the current and future - where is it heading?

While it is natural for someone in his position to want to continue the fight from abroad, I think the deal for most Hong Kong people will be that they move here and integrate.
That's not how it generally works when you get politically motivated emigration. They move to your country while taking their politics with them, and then insist that you adopt their political agenda as part of your foreign policy as well. This sometimes goes on for generations.

With people who move in order live a better lifestyle, this is less of a problem. People with a "cause" are another matter altogether.
 
This is simply not true, the principle reason for living there is business, money and rule of law, the new law directly affects that and the ramifications will begin to be felt throughout the business ecosytem soon enough, face saving subsidies from Beijing won't last that long.
It is likely to have some economic benefits as the city becomes more calm again and will help enable integration into the Greater Bay Area plan - which will turn a domestic market of 7.5m people into one of 70m people.
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Which means Hong Kong just becomes another PRC city and the unique advantages that have allowed it to prosper dissapate over the next few years. Laowai on the make will continue to hustle as usual as they are and were only really windowdressing, and it not as if there is work elsewhere for them now that Dubai has gone down the tubes.

It will be interesting to see how HK performs in the Greater Bay area plan roll out you extol, a domestic market of 7.5 sophisticated HK's replaced by a 70 million + one of mainlanders all chistling margins as only Chinese competing with Chinese can. HK will be fast absorbed apart from the bits kept on for the PRC Tourist industry.

Hong Kongers are not popular on the mainland, never have been, doubley so now, they will be drinking from the cup of bitterness offered by their countrymen on the mainland in deal after deal no doubt while being politely reminded of their special status within the PRC.

Also HK as a location for mainland SME business will begin to dry up - to howls from Kowloon, HK's rule of law was treasured by all business people all over the PRC.
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Publicly most companies are staying tight lipped but privately the law is mostly welcomed by both domestic and international firms as it allows everyone to go back to normal. There is still a massive flow of international money coming in, much of it via Hong Kong, with the lion's share of it being from US firms - make of that what you will
 
It looks like the central government has accidentally given a lot of Hong Kongers a reason to leave. They are going to tax them at mainland rates. According to this SMCP article, this tax increase, combined with the high living costs in Hong Kong, will persuade many that it is time to get out. The same financial factors will make it less attractive for mainlanders to move in to replace them.
 
We have a big coach manufacturers locally, just 3 minutes from my home.
For decades, they produced top notch vehicles specifically for HK, and as far as I know from the corner sandwich shop the lads use, had a biggy in the pipeline worth millions.
Rumour has it ( in the sandwich bar) they are not so sure now. This factory employs 450/500 perm & agency engineers & coachbuilders. It'd be a massive impact locally if....the company closed up here and concentrated on it's other premises in England. Only time will tell. I'm not sure if actual contractual orders were signed up, but if things get to the chucking of pram toys, the Chinese will do what they usually do...which is what they want.
 

Cruthin1967

Clanker
Love HK - a couple of epic runs ashore there. I would get lots of Hong Kongers over to GB ASAP. Highly educated, bloody hard workers, family-oriented. Better value than the most of our flabby, irresponsible, dole-bludging native population.
 
Love HK - a couple of epic runs ashore there. I would get lots of Hong Kongers over to GB ASAP. Highly educated, bloody hard workers, family-oriented. Better value than the most of our flabby, irresponsible, dole-bludging native population.
You might, indeed will, find that the younger generations og Hong Kongers no longer live up to those ideals.
 
Love HK - a couple of epic runs ashore there. I would get lots of Hong Kongers over to GB ASAP. Highly educated, bloody hard workers, family-oriented. Better value than the most of our flabby, irresponsible, dole-bludging native population.
Shame we can't do a straight swap.
 
Love HK - a couple of epic runs ashore there. I would get lots of Hong Kongers over to GB ASAP. Highly educated, bloody hard workers, family-oriented. Better value than the most of our flabby, irresponsible, dole-bludging native population.
With many who speak little English.
 
This is a rather interesting story in that it's about how a combination of the riots in Hong Kong and COVID-19 have put a Canadian gemstone mining company into bankruptcy. While there is also a COVID-19 angle to it, I thought that the Hong Kong angle was more interesting.
How the Hong Kong protests, combined with COVID-19, led to the near collapse of a renowned Canadian jeweller

A company called Korite International mine a rare gemstone called "ammolite" in Alberta. It's pretty much the only place in the world this is produced. Ammolite is formed from the fossilised shells of ancient sea creatures (ammonites, which are sort of like a nautilus). It is a rare gem that has an iridescent appearance. The deposits in Alberta are of exceptional quality.
The company that mines Alberta's official gemstone is on the verge of collapse after pro-democracy protests and the pandemic have combined to wipe out its biggest markets.

Ammolite is a rare iridescent gem found almost exclusively in Alberta, and Korite International, headquartered in Calgary, now produces about 90 per cent of the world's supply. It was recently a rising star in the world of precious stones, with demand surging in 2017. But the company's fortunes began to crumble when the unrest began in Hong Kong. The COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated its mounting financial losses, and Korite obtained creditor protection on June 30.

Ammolite is regarded as a Canadian national treasure, meaning the federal government must approve all applications to export it.

Ammolite comes from the shells of fossilized sea creatures called ammonites. It can be found in several places around the globe, but those found in a southern Alberta river basin are unique because of a thick layer of colour and iridescence, which are ideal for manufacturing gems.
There is particular interest in the gem in China, due to Feng Shui experts believing it has special qualities.
In 2015, a group of Calgary investors, including former company president Jay Maull, took over Korite with ambitious plans to grow the business, scaling up mining operations and partnering with a distributor in Asia as they tried to raise the gem's profile.

When they took over, the Korite mine, located south of Lethbridge, was expanded from less than one hectare to more than three hectares as the company said it was scrambling to keep up with surging demand. Executives had also reached a deal with a Chinese distributor to boost sales of ammolite jewelry in that country.

China has a unique interest in ammolite because Feng Shui experts are said to believe the gems can enhance health, wealth and wisdom.
A large proportion of ammolite sales take place through Hong Kong at trade shows. However, the riots and protests in Hong Kong forced those trade shows to be cancelled, blowing a hole in ammolite sales. COVID-19 disruptions have been enough to push the company over the edge.
The financial hardships began last year. A large portion of the company's sales in Asia were at trade shows in Hong Kong, but those events were cancelled amid ongoing massive and sometimes violent protests, resulting in the loss of over $2.4 million in anticipated sales, according to insolvency documents filed by the company.

"Hong Kong people appreciate precious gems — the rarer, the better," said Gordon Houlden, a former diplomat who has worked in Beijing and Hong Kong and is now director of the China Institute at the University of Alberta.

He was in Hong Kong last year when Korite was at an exhibition showcasing its product to Chinese buyers.

"The demonstrations created an unusual situation: Transport was disrupted, occasional disruptions to the airport. I thought overall it was manageable, but it was having an effect on the local economy," he said.
They are now looking for investors to refloat the company. But with the situation in Hong Kong being so uncertain, a deal may be difficult to put together now.
 

riksavage

Old-Salt
Hong Kong media mogul arrested under new security law.
I'm concerned for the future of the South China Morning Post. Time for them to leave, I think.
The Apple Daily has always been a thorn in the side of authority, even during the Colonial era. It certainly wouldn’t be allowed to operate in Singapore based on its normal content.
 
Quite 'coincidentally' Jimmy Lai's personal aide/business partner is 'ex'-CIA

 
Quite 'coincidentally' Jimmy Lai's personal aide/business partner is 'ex'-CIA
Would that be 'ex-CIA' in the same way Ren Zhengfei is 'ex-PLA' or an entirely different kind of 'ex'?
 
The Chinese coast guard intercepted a speed boat off the coast of Guangdong, believed to be on its way to Taiwan. According to media reports, on the boat were 10 people, including activist Andy Li. Li had been arrested earlier this month on charges of collusion with foreign powers.

The coast guard reported that two people with the surname Li and Tang were detained, but I suppose that doesn't narrow things down too much in that part of the world.

Hong Kong pro-democracy activist reportedly among those detained after China intercepts boat
Chinese authorities have arrested at least 10 people, including a Hong Kong pro-democracy activist, after its coast guard intercepted a speedboat believed to be heading to Taiwan, media reports said Thursday.

The reports, citing unnamed sources, said activist Andy Li was among those detained. Li had been arrested earlier this month with nine others on charges of collusion with foreign forces under a sweeping national security law imposed by Beijing and was out on bail.

A social media post by China's coast guard said the arrests were made on Sunday when it intercepted the boat off the coast of the southern province of Guangdong. It said that two people surnamed Li and Tang were among those detained. It was not immediately clear what charges they're facing.

"We are aware of such reports. For the time being, we do not have any information from the mainland-relevant authorities," Hong Kong police commissioner Chris Tang told a news conference Thursday.
 
The Chinese coast guard intercepted a speed boat off the coast of Guangdong, believed to be on its way to Taiwan. According to media reports, on the boat were 10 people, including activist Andy Li. Li had been arrested earlier this month on charges of collusion with foreign powers.

The coast guard reported that two people with the surname Li and Tang were detained, but I suppose that doesn't narrow things down too much in that part of the world.

Hong Kong pro-democracy activist reportedly among those detained after China intercepts boat
Rioters (the ones who liked to say "we will take bullets for you") running away because they are too cowardly to face up to their actions. No different to rioters from Portland trying to take a boat to Mexico to avoid prosecution.
 
Rioters (the ones who liked to say "we will take bullets for you") running away because they are too cowardly to face up to their actions. No different to rioters from Portland trying to take a boat to Mexico to avoid prosecution.
At this point there's a number of questions that we don't have answers to. Such as, who else was on the boat? Whose boat is it, and who arranged and paid for the boat? The answers to that may be a lot more interesting than what rumours we've read so far.
 

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