Hong Kong - Its past, the current and future - where is it heading?

Link these two stories together, and things could be about to get very ugly.

'A 70-year-old government worker who was hit in the head with a brick thrown during clashes between protesters and residents in Hong Kong died on Thursday night. The Prince of Wales Hospital confirmed that the man, surnamed Luo, was left in a critical condition after being struck on the head in the Hong Kong border town of Sheung Shui on Wednesday was treated in the neurosurgery department before he died.

'Police said Friday they are treating the man’s death as murder, claiming he was “maliciously” killed by a black-clad person in a mask



'Yesterday, in fact, Xi Jinping threw all his support on the Hong Kong police and the use of force, and on the judges to radically punish those who contravened the law. Speaking in Brasilia at a BRICS summit (Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa), he said that the most urgent priority for Hong Kong is to end the violence and restore order. Expressing support for Chief Executive Carrie Lam, he added: "We sternly support the Hong Kong police to take forceful actions in enforcing the law, and the Hong Kong judiciary to punish in accordance with the law those who have committed violent crimes".'

 
Cant see the turning of the University into a de facto armed separatist enclave surviving long
 
Cant see the turning of the University into a de facto armed separatist enclave surviving long
Ironic that they've picked the Chinese University of Hong Kong...
 
Ironic that they've picked the Chinese University of Hong Kong...
Getting to the end-game.

'A heavily-fortified university campus in Hong Kong has been stormed by police with some declaring it a “war zone”.

'Police stormed the Hong Kong Polytechnic University before dawn on Monday where anti-government protesters had barricaded themselves behind sophisticated and elaborate walls. They had been fighting back using catapults, petrol bombs and bows and arrows — one of which landed in the leg of a police officer. The ABC’s China correspondent, Bill Birtles, is in the thick of it and says “all hell is breaking loose”.'


 
China is long past the era of needing Hong Kong for anything other than to help complete their collection of formerly wayward Chinese territories and the protesters in Hong Kong don't appear to have realised that times have changed and they are living in China.
Precisely.
 
Precisely.
Not entirely true, Whilst HK's contribution to China's GDP has declined dramatically since 1997 it is still the major gateway for inward investment into PRC.

Correct, though, that the university, and high school students, who make up the majority of the rioters have a massively over inflated sense of their own importance.
 
Correct, though, that the university, and high school students, who make up the majority of the rioters have a massively over inflated sense of their own importance.
It's not just them, youth in a surprising number of places have talked this up into Tiananmen Mk2.

A social media article widely shared across Taiwan used the term 大屠殺 ('massacre') to describe the police attempt to close down the weapons factory at CUHK in which they were met with rocks, arrows and petrol bombs but nobody actually died.

This is being driven by sheer visceral emotion and it has a way to go yet before it burns out.
 
When I was there it was paradise:

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(...) Correct, though, that the university, and high school students, who make up the majority of the rioters have a massively over inflated sense of their own importance.
Is there any indication as to how many of the activists have access to a foreign passport? I've been curious as to what their plans are after things have quieted down and they start to think about their own personal futures.
 
Is there any indication as to how many of the activists have access to a foreign passport? I've been curious as to what their plans are after things have quieted down and they start to think about their own personal futures.
I expect that the PRC already have plans longterm for them.
 
Is there any indication as to how many of the activists have access to a foreign passport? I've been curious as to what their plans are after things have quieted down and they start to think about their own personal futures.
Given the ages and backgrounds, probably not many by now. The ones that do are likely to be concentrated in the upper ranks of the definitely-not-leadership.
 

overopensights

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It's not just them, youth in a surprising number of places have talked this up into Tiananmen Mk2.

A social media article widely shared across Taiwan used the term 大屠殺 ('massacre') to describe the police attempt to close down the weapons factory at CUHK in which they were met with rocks, arrows and petrol bombs but nobody actually died.

This is being driven by sheer visceral emotion and it has a way to go yet before it burns out.
I'm not surprised that people in Taiwan would be following the situation in Hong Kong very closely, as they would see it as having some direct or indirect relevance to Taiwan.

I haven't been seeing much indication of exceptional interest in Canada though, despite the large number of people who have family connections to Hong Kong. Canada issued a routine statement during the summer, as well as another one jointly with the EU. The Chinese embassy in Ottawa issued a routine "mind your own business" response.
Chinese Embassy tells Canada to stop meddling in Hong Kong affairs

That's the official response, and I haven't seen much unofficial interest from the usual suspects since the summer.

Here's a story from CBC Radio from a month ago which is nominally about the Canadian election, but incidentally covers Hong Kong issues (Canadians living on Hong Kong could vote in the Canadian election).
Canadian voters in Hong Kong on democracy, Canada-China relations and the federal election
There is an audio clip of interviews with Canadian citizens living in Hong Kong (their English is a bit iffy, so probably born in Hong Kong and lived in Canada a few years before going back). It's short (6 minutes) but well worth listening to. They express disappointment in the lack of response from Canada to the current situation.

One of them (from the Progressive Lawyers Group in Hong Kong) talked about the ability of foreign passport holders to leave, but also talked up the need for Western countries to offer asylum to protesters who want to leave Hong Kong plus also offering assistance (I assume of the financial sort) to them.

Overall they don't sound like a movement on the cusp of victory.

Meanwhile in Iraq, the government is shooting down loads of people in the streets, with very little criticism from anyone. Didn't the US and UK bring freedom and democracy to them on the point of a bayonet not that long ago?
 
Meanwhile in Iraq, the government is shooting down loads of people in the streets, with very little criticism from anyone. Didn't the US and UK bring freedom and democracy to them on the point of a bayonet not that long ago?
A case of what we rather we forget about?
 
This is a minor story, but mildly interesting. There are apparently a few people living in Canada who say they are flying to Hong Kong to vote in the upcoming elections. Apparently you are supposed to be a resident of Hong Kong in order to vote, but these people think they will be able to vote. They are from Hong Kong originally, and I'm not sure whether they have been able to maintain residency status there while away. It's not a cut and dried situation, as it depends on a number of factors.
These young people are flying from B.C. to vote in Hong Kong's elections
Stacey Ng lives in Vancouver but can't stop thinking about Hong Kong.

While the University of British Columbia is calling for exchange students to leave the city amid rising threats of violence, Ng has purchased a ticket to fly in the opposite direction.

The 25-year-old is heading back in a few days to cast her ballot in Hong Kong's district elections on Nov. 24.

"I am scared. I'm terrified right now. I don't even know if I'm going to be arrested for going out on a street," she said nervously.

"But I feel ... a sense of responsibility. The feeling that I got from seeing the news … I feel like that trumps all over my fear and a lot of my uncertainty. I feel like I still need to go."
The presence or absence of a handful of people such as this won't make a difference in the election, but it does show their degree of emotional attachment to recent events there.

From my perspective it looks like typical immigrant politics which we see in people who come from many parts of the world. This rarely leaks out into broader society unless there are enough of them to make them a voting block worth paying attention to.

Also in the same story, a former Hong Kong legislative councillor currently in Vancouver had some interesting things to say about the upcoming election in Hong Kong. He says that the elected council will have little real power, but election could still be a problem for president Xi Jinping. If those who oppose Xi win, then he would lose face and he could never allow that to happen.
Albert Chan, a former Hong Kong district and legislative councillor currently living in Vancouver, says officials elected this Sunday will hold little decision-making power.

"The district council mainly addresses the local issues and also [acts] as a consultative body if the government wants to consult on an issue," he said. "But even after consultation, the government still can decide whatever they like."

But he says the upcoming election could be a problem for Chinese president Xi Jinping.

"If they are going to lose the election, that means that he is going to lose face. For a presidency, he will never accept such events to happen in Hong Kong," Chan said.
It's not clear to me that this would be a serious problem for Beijing, but it perhaps suggests what the protesters are hoping for as a consolation prize.
 
Given the ages and backgrounds, probably not many by now. The ones that do are likely to be concentrated in the upper ranks of the definitely-not-leadership.
Interesting that the few spokes people that there are (Joshua Wong, Joey Siu etc.) al have other countries to run to
 

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