Hong Kong - Its past, the current and future - where is it heading?

There's another, longer video of the incident which shows them pulling specific individuals off the train and arresting them.

The protests have been accompanied from the start by rock throwing and the use of laser pointers to try to blind policemen. I'm not surprised the UK police are running out of sympathy at the stage in the game.

See the incident where Officer Bald Lau Sir raises his shotgun at the crowd that garnered widespread support in mainland China. The Officer has a rather severe burn to one of his eyes from a laser. Many of those lasers are very defo not eyesafe models, look more to be 10mw plus range.
 
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There's another, longer video of the incident which shows them pulling specific individuals off the train and arresting them.

The protests have been accompanied from the start by rock throwing and the use of laser pointers to try to blind policemen. I'm not surprised the UK police are running out of sympathy at the stage in the game.
The bits of video where we can see the people the police are after, some of them are wearing black masks. The police seem to be going through them, possibly looking for specific individuals, not making mass arrests. Crowds of apparently uninvolved people were standing well clear.

Quite possibly this was a group of people who were making a get away through the subway after being involved in something which attracted the attention of the riot police, whom I imagine aren't spending a lot of time on minor infractions at the moment.

I have also seen news reports about the use of laser pointers to blind police. Those things aren't a joke and I don't have any sympathy for the individuals involved in those acts.

P.S. I think you meant the HK police rather than the UK police, although I imagine the UK police wouldn't be doing things much differently. However, given that certain segments of society in the UK may go into melt down mode this autumn in the UK due to the progress of certain upcoming political events which I won't mention here, the UK police may be in for a bit of a work out as well.
 
P.S. I think you meant the HK police rather than the UK police
Apologies, I did indeed. In mitigation, I'd like to mention that North Korea could easily solve their missile problems in they started fuelling them with Kaohliang.
 
However, given that certain segments of society in the UK may go into melt down mode this autumn in the UK due to the progress of certain upcoming political events which I won't mention here, the UK police may be in for a bit of a work out as well.
Should be interesting to say the least.
 
I was in Tung Chung yesterday with my kids as all of the rioters began to congregate. The most shocking thing is that they are all kids, literally spotty teenagers. Clearly for a lot of them it is a bit of a lark to smash up an MTR station and disrupt passengers heading to the airport.

This isn't revolution, much of it is barely even protest rather than wanton violence and destruction, these are kids concerned about inequality and opportunity in HK, compared to booming Shenzhen next door, doing everything that they can to make life even more difficult for themselves.

What is becoming apparent, at least through my conversations is that locals and foreigners alike are rapidly losing sympathy for them and support is noticeably waning.
 
On another, related, note, there are quite a number photos knocking around of western men* apparently briefing protesters both in person and via mobiles on social media which, further, raises suspicions of foreign influences.

*In the interests of gender equality it should be noted that Julie Eadeh, a 'political counselor' based in the US embassy here has also been photographed briefing protesters in a hotel and accompanying Joshua Wong at a rally.

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I appreciate your contribution - if this is indeed 'western' involvement it is surely pretty clumsy, or naive. Should there be any CCP involvement it would not be as obvious. What is the source of the images?
 
I appreciate your contribution - if this is indeed 'western' involvement it is surely pretty clumsy, or naive. Should there be any CCP involvement it would not be as obvious. What is the source of the images?
It certainly does seem that way but who can say for sure? Certainly Julie Eadeh's involvement has been confirmed by multiple media sources. The above pics, also, I have seen in multiple sources. I might be wrong, they may just be benevolent onlookers offering the oppressed a shoulder to cry on.
 
On another, related, note, there are quite a number photos knocking around of western men* apparently briefing protesters both in person and via mobiles on social media which, further, raises suspicions of foreign influences.

*In the interests of gender equality it should be noted that Julie Eadeh, a 'political counselor' based in the US embassy here has also been photographed briefing protesters in a hotel and accompanying Joshua Wong at a rally.

View attachment 414564

Incredibly naive of the Americans, Beijing will be delighted at this vindication of their susoicions.
 
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Incredibly naive if tge Americans, Beijing will be delighted at this vindication if their susoicions.
Beijing don't have any suspicions. They know, based on decades of experience and evidence, as well as repeated US policy statements, that the US intends to interfere in their internal affairs.

It's not paranoia if they've spent large amounts of money since you came into being trying to get you.
 
Beijing don't have any suspicions. They know, based on decades of experience and evidence, as well as repeated US policy statements, that the US intends to interfere in their internal affairs.

It's not paranoia if they've spent large amounts of money since you came into being trying to get you.

Indeed, but this is very public and very ham fisted.
Its amateur night at the State Department.
 
Indeed, but this is very public and very ham fisted.
Its amateur night at the State Department.
I remain unconvinced (but open to being convinced). Surely an embassy would use LEC? And really: beige baseball cap, black/dark blue polo shirt, tan cargo trousers? You just know that bloke is wearing hiking boots and a GBFO diver's watch, don't you?

Unless that embassy wants them to be seen, to send a message.
 
I was in Tung Chung yesterday with my kids as all of the rioters began to congregate. The most shocking thing is that they are all kids, literally spotty teenagers.
There is another, very significant but oft overlooked point about the age of the protesters - not just of the "spotty teenagers" but of those in their twenties and thirties.

1997 and reversion to Chinese sovereignty was twenty two years ago, so none under 40 have any experience of HK "democracy" as a British colony. Even those in their late 30's were too young to vote prior to 1997, and there was, in any case, no democracy and no desire for it and the current demand for a "return" to democracy is pure fantasy. It never existed.

For 150 years Britain ruled HK exactly as the Chinese are doing now - if anything, with considerably less "democracy" and local input, through a British governor with selected local representatives. In the last few years before 1997 under Chris Patten a sham of democracy was introduced with elections for half the Legislative Council (Legco) whose responsibilities were largely administrative (refuse collection, public toilets, etc) while the Executive Council (Exco) who actuaally ran things remained selected entirely by Britain. Unsurprisingly the HK electorate didn't care about the "elections" so there was a minimal turnout of 30%. Since 1997 the PRC has actually given the HK people far more democracy than they ever had, or wanted, under British rule.

HK and Chinese people have never had "democracy". It's an alien, Western concept as my HK Chinese Coy 2ic explained to me after the first HK "elections" in which he was the only one of a couple of dozen HK Chinese HKMSC officers to vote - and then he'd only done so as I'd asked him if he was going to. As he explained, you can't miss something you've never had and all the freedom most HK people wanted was little more than the freedom to make money.

Had the British introduced "democracy" and universal suffrage then things may have been very different and the PRC may have had some obligation to continue the process ..... but they didn't.

Instead the British ensured that the PRC had no reason to continue any "one country, two systems" policy other than a purely financially pragmatic one. Britain could have very easily continued to give HK
citizens British Dependent Territories passports and citizenship which the HK people could have used to put pressure on the PRC as it gave 3 million HK people, and their children and descendants, the right to leave HK and to move to and live and work in the UK. Very few would have ever used it as their home was / is HK, but the threat of a mass exodus would always have been there.

Instead, the British took away 3 million British citizens' rights to live and work in the UK and made them British Nationals Overseas, with no right of abode or to work in the UK with a British "nationality" that dies with them as it can't be passed on to their children.

To add insult to injury the British tried to persuade Portugal to do the same for its Portugese citizens in Macao; to their credit, albeit numbers are very different, the Portugese didn't follow the British example and "their" Macao citizens have full Portugese (and usually dual Chinese) citizenship, as do their children.

So far the PRC has resisted the temptation to use PRC police or the PRC tps based in HK, instead exclusively using the local HK police and minimising arrests and so avoiding condemnation by the West. Somehow the West has forgotten that that's exactly what the British did back in 1967, arresting 5,000 and convicting and imprisoning 2,000.

Britain has nothing to be proud of in its legacy in HK.
 
What JohnG said

People forget just how much rioting and killing there was in Hong Kong in 66/67
That rifle regularly got a day out.

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What JohnG said

People forget just how much rioting and killing there was in Hong Kong in 66/67
That rifle regularly got a day out.

View attachment 414772
Back in my time in Hong Kong I was told that when the PLA crossed the border at Sha Tau Kok (some time in 66-67) and occupied the police station, 10GR were ready to do a battalion attack when a withdrawal was negotiated. The person telling me had been a platoon commander in 10 GR at the time.
 
What JohnG said

People forget just how much rioting and killing there was in Hong Kong in 66/67
That rifle regularly got a day out.

View attachment 414772
I suspect that if the UK shipped some of those surplus rifles to the HKPF then the mere sight of them would have ended the riots and had the protesters handing themselves in to the nearest jail.
 

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