Honda CG125 1979 - realistic restoration project?

Slime

LE
As other have mentioned, the cost or achievability will depend on whether you want it back to factory fresh, or just nice looking.

Indicstir housings or handlebars sprayed up in satin black will be miles cheaper than re chroming or new parts.

Making yourself a DIY electroplating tank will remove a lot of hard work and time with rust removal.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
My Brother is restoring a rare motorcycle
its up and running and he has ridden it around a thousand miles to make sure he likes it
he will drop it off to Antonio at Didcot and collect it a month later all done
if he didnt like it , then he could have sold it at a small profit with ease, there is only one other in the UK
the other two bikes he tried were sold on after a few months, one he lost 50 quid on, but it needed too much doing and did not suit him, the lanky sod, the other one he made a 200 quid profit, by fitting a new set of tyres and a battery, a thorough clean and a good long run followed by an oil change and a tune up, again it did not suit his riding style, both could have consumed thousands in proff` repair costs, both went to motorcyclists who were happy to do the work themselves and knew the faults
 
A bit like restoring MGs -- you will spend more on it than it will ever be worth.

Do it because you want to, but expect it to be a money pit.

Performance, handling and braking are nowhere near modern standards, so don't expect to cut it in modern traffic.

As mentioned, chrome is expensive, corrosion in the frame could be a killer, but the engine is simple.
 
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Being of that bent, I looked (well glanced really) at flipping bikes as hobby and money earner a few years back.
I have the room, the tools and skills - I owned a Triumph as well as a Landy so there wasn't much to scare me.
Doing up a Honda VT250F like I had when I were a lad really appealed, except the cost didn't.

Crappy bits of plastic that get scratched cost a fortune, even after market stuff.

OEM essentials such as an O ring for the carb which would be made from Unobtainium would set you back 20 quid and if you managed to find an after market one, it would be in Arsecrack Utah and they'd get confused about sticking stuff in the post and even then you needed a few slightly different versions.

Now and then I consider it when I come across a M/C specific tool in the garage, but then I find the remaining unobtainuim O rings that no bugger wants.
 
I used to have an MG Midget.

I bought it for £2,750, spent innumerable hours on it, replaced lots of rotten bits of metal, most of the front & rear suspension, lots of upgraded bits etc etc. Worked the engine over, new rings, bearings, reground valves, gasflowed bits. Must have spent about £4,000 plus countless hours on it.

9 years later I sold it for £2,400
 

Chef

LE
My first bike was an earlier Honda 125:
1969 Honda SS125


As @Dark_Nit says:
Performance, handling and braking are nowhere near modern standards, so don't expect to cut it in modern traffic.
If it's to learn restoration techniques on fair enough but it'll probably not recoup its costs.

Unlessit's the one T.E.Lawrence crashed in Bovvy (and it's not cos' I had that one.)
 

Chef

LE
Bet you wish you still had it to sell now!
I'm surprised how much they go for £2000 or so. Mine cost £115 and I sold it a couple of years and a few spills later for £150. A good learning bike. It would have cost more in storage than it made in the intervening period.

It had tyres made by Nitto, better known for plastic kits.
 

goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer
Yes, if you can get it at a realistic price then get it.

Plenty of spares about and the guys at David Silver are very helpful. They will tell you if parts from another model will fit your machine, for example.

They are fairly easy to work on and will make a good restoration entry bike that you can enjoy.

Do it!
 

goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer
AYe but too many of my friends have gone dreamlike into a project without being realisitc about costs and timescale
guess who used to end up sorting them out !
The OP won't know until he tries it though mate. Almost needs to scratch that itch. If he starts the project and doesn't like it he can sell it on...
 
If I can get this old thing running that had been sat for 11 years anything is possible.
Think I threw around £100 at it.
IMG_20200510_100418~2_compress72~2.jpg
 
Isn’t it the most popular motorised vehicle in the world? Still made in Pakistan.

You shouldn’t struggle for spares.
Honda cub or super cub is the biggest selling IIRC
 
Raised eyebrow here - why water in an air cooled job ?
Condensation.
Sun comes up, air warms up, moisture evaporates.
Sun goes down, air cools down, Rh of air reaches 100%, excess airborne water vapour condenses, usually on metal surfaces, because they conduct heat and have a high thermal capacity. Metal feels cold.
Tools rust in unheated sheds, you get water in oil storage tanks. You get dew on the grass in the morning, even when it hasn't rained and the weatherman talks about 'precipitation' (rain, snow, dew, etc).
You'll get water appearing in the oil of unused engines and rust on the surfaces of unused bearings.
 
Condensation.
Sun comes up, air warms up, moisture evaporates.
Sun goes down, air cools down, Rh of air reaches 100%, excess airborne water vapour condenses, usually on metal surfaces, because they conduct heat and have a high thermal capacity. Metal feels cold.
Tools rust in unheated sheds, you get water in oil storage tanks. You get dew on the grass in the morning, even when it hasn't rained and the weatherman talks about 'precipitation' (rain, snow, dew, etc).
You'll get water appearing in the oil of unused engines and rust on the surfaces of unused bearings.
who knew brian cox was on here....
 
who knew brian cox was on here....
Engineer, building services, air conditioning. The percentage of people who know (or care) about diurnal changes in the water content of air is usually small, but it's why unused cars and bikes rust. You may have known all that, others didn't.
 
Over the years, I've had everything from an XT125 through a couple of GPZ's, a Slingshot and a Pan European with several in between, including 3 X Armstrong 500's.

I've never restored one, but without doubt, one of the best, most reliable, and most fun, was a CG125. Great little bike. Go for it!
 
I'm might be having another breakdown, but I'm tempted by this Honda CG125 coming up for auction near me. No reserve on it.

One owner, it has sat unused since it's first MoT in 1982 when it had covered just 279 miles. It comes with the original bill of sale, V5, 1982 MoT, dealers wallet, workshop manual and service book. Apparently 'the engine turns freely', although I suspect that means without the engine running.

I have no experience in the restoration of bikes, but this one looks in quite good nick, considering the year. I'm going down to look at it next week with a view to bidding on it, and am wondering if anyone's done any bike restoration and can advise what I should be looking out for. There seem to be plenty of CG125s still running, so I guess parts can be obtained.

Is this a realistic project for a newbie?View attachment 477852View attachment 477853View attachment 477854
If you want to spend a thousand or so to fix up a CG125 then go for it. You'll get 50 quid for it when you're done.
Reason. CG125.
 

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