Homebrew Thread

#1
As others have said lets have a Homebrew Thread, so here it is!!

Used to do homebrew about 15yrs ago but not since.
Do Boots still do brew kits?

If not where's the best place to buy from, either in Surrey/Sussex or SW London or Online?
 
C

cloudbuster

Guest
#2
Boots? No. Larger Tesco, some Wilkinsons. Local Craft-brewing shops, and, of course, the Interwebnetwork.
 
#3
Now here's a good thread to follow from the start..

I've not home brewed since the mid 90's, but have a sh*d....patience... and interest and have procrastinated about brewing at home again many times but always ended up at the pub or supermarket, what with summer on the way and evening bbqs' on the horizon, could be a good time to re start.
Is a (sotto voce) shed warm enough for brewing
 
#5
Wilkinsons do a decent wine kit, 30 bottles kit ready to drink in 7 days if desperate.
 
#7
If you haven't been near home brewing for a good few years then you are in for a very pleasant surprise - it's all come on in leaps and bounds and the days of getting hallucagenically pissed on some ghastly overly sweet liquid and then scouring like a newborn lamb for three days are over.The new brew kits are absolutely spot on and, of course, Google and Ebay are your friends.
 
#8
Start with good quality kits like Brupaks or Woodfordes. These need very little in the way of equipment, a FV and a keg (or bottles), a bit of syphon tube, a hydrometer. About 50p a pint.

Move on to extract brewing. A bit more kit. A bit cheaper.

Move to the dark side and all grain brewing. More kit, but about 22p a pint and better than most beers sold commercially.

Look at a well-established site like jimsbeerkit for guidance.

HOME BREW FORUM - JIM'S BEER KIT • Index page

Would be nice to have an in-house thread, too.

PS brewing since 1974, no beard, no sandals, still a 32" waist, last marathon a disappointingly pedestrian 3:09, a personal worst out of 28.
 
#11
OMG dont talk about home brew......I did a few kits of home brew in the early 90's...first couple were average...however the last one i did was wild.... my brother and his partner at the time and my BF had three bottles of the stuff one night..was ok.. nothing great but drinkable....after enjoying the chat for a couple of hours and two of the bottles downed, i decided to go to the loo...i stood up and my legs were pissed could not walk to save my life....as the others laughed their heads off...I crawled to the loo and back again...at this point was called a light weight..much to my humour everyone else had pissed legs, after the third bottle and time to go home, which was a mile away, and an easy walk but not after this brew it was decided just to sleep where we had been sitting..after that i decided not to bother with it...but good luck with yours
 
C

cloudbuster

Guest
#12
Gets a big thumbs-up from me, too. Hoping to move up from kits to all-grain in the near future as space allows. 48 bottles of Pils at home waiting patiently for me.

Brewed off and on for about 30 years, pipe, slippers, cardigan. Too fat to fly, too old to give a ****.
 
#13
Just because you can brew highly sugared falling down water doesn't mean you have to. 4 to 5% abv is fine for most purposes.
 
#14
I presume , before googling, there are ways of testing alcohol content other than through severity of liver/kidney damage?
You measure original gravity and final gravity using a hydrometer (or refractometer, if you're flash). Kits are designed to produce standard strength beers. For some reason, some people add extra sugar or extract for added oblivion.

I put this up last year, it's all grain brewing. For kit brewing you need a cooker, some big pans, a FV, a keg or bottles and some bits and bobs:

Real Ale for Real Men? | Page 11 | Army Rumour Service

CIMG1413e.jpg

CIMG1306.JPG
 
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#15
Agreed that's a really nice looking pint there.

Daft question, but how do you get a head on it like that?. I have only had a couple of goes at home brew and although it wasn't too bad, I have never been able to produce anything with a head on it. After reading this thread, I am going to get myself another pack and get some more going for this summer.
 
#16
The head is a matter of ingredients and carbonation. Torrified wheat is good, say 5% of the grist. Once you get a feel for brewing with kits, you can start to tinker by adding other grains and hops to the basic kit. There are dozens of different grains, hops and yeasts and because you can also tinker with different water chemistry and fermentation regimes (temperature, duration, lagering etc) there really is a very broad spectrum of beer to be enjoyed.

Another significant factor is the glass, the slightest trace of detergent left in the glass will kill the head. This is why your decent barman has a tea-towel in place over his shoulder.
 
#17
I've spent less than £100 on equipment, the Burco boiler came out of a skip. The mash tun is a converted picnic box. I've made my own copper filters and bought the immersion cooler, though they are also simple to make. I could sell the whole caboodle for well over £200, if not £350.

As I say, learn the ropes with kits and work up.

People have been brewing for several thousand years, it's not difficult to make beer.
 
#18
Has anyone got a decent write up for cider? I've looked about t'interweb but just seem to come up with a load of different ones but none I fancy. I've never did it before but get a fine crop of apples of me grandpa's apple tree every year and I'd love to give it a go and see how it turns out.

Sent from my brick using poo stained fingers
 
C

cloudbuster

Guest
#19
People have been brewing for several thousand years, it's not difficult to make beer.
As was explained to me once on the old NBC Instructor's Course; a civilisation with the technology to brew beer is also capable of making chemical weapons.

Sounds about right.
 
#20
I'm lucky enough to have a small orchard,I've got pear, apple, plum and quince trees, also got black and red current bushes, my nieghbour has got an apricot tree but I haven't been lucky enough to get my theiving hands on that crop yet.

When I first saw the orchard I said to the missus, "**** me, I'm gonna have to do something with all the fruit, I could make jam" She gave me one of those withering looks only a woman can do and said "Dont be a twat, make some wine you ******* idiot".

So I do, got all my kit from junk shops. got three demijons, two for active brewing and one to 'rack' into, got a bucket with a lid for the initial brewing and collect wine bottles from the re-cycle dump, picked up an old bbc 'how to make wine' book circa 1970 with a price tag of 50p on it from the local sally army shop for a dollar and cracked on. it's so simple, the most important thing is to sterilize everything and get the fruit off the trees before the sodding possums do. it hits the spot as well :) haven't done anything with the quince tree fruit yet, anyone want that stuff?
 
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